3,000 Ancient Buddhas Unearthed in China....

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posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 07:01 AM
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Originally posted by rudeboyrave
whats with all of the mushrooms in "2712"


They are magic mushrooms


Amazing find, I wonder if they hold some form of information inside!?




posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 07:10 AM
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Originally posted by rudeboyrave
whats with all of the mushrooms in "2712"




Mushrooms have always been used throughout our existence to attain spirituality and a closeness to "god"
There are theories that actually religions themselves (at least some) originated through the use of mushrooms.

Also theories that Jesus was a mushroom...

So I would imagine the Chinese, being as advanced as they were, also knew about the Mushroom and its benefits.


www.philipcoppens.com...


Also remember the 2,700 year old weed found in China?

www.thestar.com...


It's only in the last few centuries that all of these have become bad... and people have been warned off of taking certain things.

Most ancient mysticism and much knowledge was learned through these practices.


www.telegraph.co.uk...

en.wikipedia.org...


All of this would make a fantastic thread...

Unfortunately.... not on ATS.


edit on 20/4/12 by blupblup because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 07:44 AM
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reply to post by rudeboyrave
 


Um...I think those are lotus buds dude.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 07:53 AM
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As much as this is an awesome find. I can't help but visualise that site is just where the production line dumped all their seconds.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 08:20 AM
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reply to post by Suspiria
 


It's a great find , however I cant understand why you thought that it was a production line dumping extras.

It was at great cost to buddhists to have the statues carved as gifts , and even went to lengths to include precious metals , stones and pigments.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 08:23 AM
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reply to post by sapien82
 


Didn't think, visualised..There's a difference.
Dig deep.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 11:11 AM
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Most interesting to me is that those don't appear to be the traditional depictions of "Chinese" Buddha.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 12:11 PM
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reply to post by sputniksteve
 


My earlier post answers your question;


Originally posted by Ericthenewbie
reply to post by pacifier2012
 



The Buddha is not fat. All statues portraying the historical Buddha show him as slim as befits a man who ate only enough to satisfy hunger not to be full and spent his life wandering over the countryside. The statues of the "fat Buddha" are actually statues of a Chinese monk named Hotei, who was famous for his generosity and kindness to children. Confusing those images with the Buddha is like confusing Santa Claus with Jesus. Part of the confusion may arise from the fact that Hotei's name in Chinese is Budai.
Buddha advocated a middle way in your approach to life, part of this is to eat until you are no longer hungry - not until you are full. Combining this with a vegetarian diet and a lifestyle which involved walking about giving his discussions or sermons, it is likely that he was fit and slender not fat.
As far as the non-Buddhist view that Buddha was fat, this is probably due to the fact that most people's only contact with Buddha images is Hotei, the fat laughing oriental figure often seen in restaurants, or the fat Buddha seen in Hollywood movies.


Source



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 01:51 PM
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Originally posted by Ericthenewbie
reply to post by sputniksteve
 


My earlier post answers your question;


Originally posted by Ericthenewbie
reply to post by pacifier2012
 



The Buddha is not fat. All statues portraying the historical Buddha show him as slim as befits a man who ate only enough to satisfy hunger not to be full and spent his life wandering over the countryside. The statues of the "fat Buddha" are actually statues of a Chinese monk named Hotei, who was famous for his generosity and kindness to children. Confusing those images with the Buddha is like confusing Santa Claus with Jesus. Part of the confusion may arise from the fact that Hotei's name in Chinese is Budai.
Buddha advocated a middle way in your approach to life, part of this is to eat until you are no longer hungry - not until you are full. Combining this with a vegetarian diet and a lifestyle which involved walking about giving his discussions or sermons, it is likely that he was fit and slender not fat.
As far as the non-Buddhist view that Buddha was fat, this is probably due to the fact that most people's only contact with Buddha images is Hotei, the fat laughing oriental figure often seen in restaurants, or the fat Buddha seen in Hollywood movies.


Source



I thought of a better way to say what I mean. I have been traveling to China for the last 7 years. Last year was the first time I ever went to another Asian country that wasn't China. Last year was the first time I had ever seen a "skinny" Buddha.

While your quote may be correct, it isn't at the same time. If you go to China, you don't see skinny Buddha. You see fat Buddha. You might tell me that isn't actually the Buddha, but a couple billion Chinese might argue with you. Right or wrong.
edit on 4/20/2012 by sputniksteve because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 01:55 PM
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Buddha STATUES =/= Buddhas

Anything to attract people to an article / thread... gross deception.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 02:07 PM
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Originally posted by daynight42
Buddha STATUES =/= Buddhas

Anything to attract people to an article / thread... gross deception.


Jesus Statue =/= jesus..?

Picture of watermelon =/= watermelon..?

I don't think I understand your point.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 02:57 PM
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Upon reading

en.wikipedia.org...

It actually seems as if there is no set practice for buddhism. Presectarian Buddhism is the oldest, although if I am not mistaken, the wikki article can be intrepreted as informing the reader that, Buddhism can never really be fully authentic. Upon observation at my own Buddhist temple in loomington, IN, which happens to be where the Dalai Lama's brother owns a temple, I noticed that they in fact eat as well as serves meat. Buddhism is a pretty neat philosophy, although given the mixed feelings within the linguistic department. I definately feel it can be more susseptible to being reconverted by the new agers. Although I love messages they have to offer, but I have pledged not to read sudo science anymore. The history of man is truly exciting. SF OP



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 03:00 PM
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reply to post by blupblup
 


Oddly enough, or rather quite uniquely, there is no known history of psilocybine use in China. The only known reference is for a cure for 'laughing sickness' caused by accidently ingesting 'weed mushrooms', psilocybine producing mushroom. Clearly the Chinese used various mushrooms both for culinary and medicinal purposes, but not for spiritual reasons, and there doesn't seem to have been any taboo against it either.

It is perhaps because they relied so heavily on mushrooms and fungi as a food source, unlike the West that didn't really embrace mushrooms as a protein source, that they rejected their psilocybine producers Panaeolus subbalteatus which tend to grow like a weed, hence the name 'weed mushroom', amongst other crops of mushroom. And also because of the low level of cattle domestication in favour of pigs. Psilocybine cubensis is certainly connected in our early history to cattle domestication, and it still shows a preference for cow pats today, although it doesn't baulk at sheep droppings either, but pig poo just doesn't have the same benefits it seems.

The Chinese may have used Amanita muscaria, though again there is no evidence, but as R Gordon Wasson pointed out, all evidence points to that practice originating in Siberia and spreading south into Europe. As a friend I mentioned this too pointed out to me, it is perhaps therefore, that like Santa Claus, or St Nick, no conincidence that certain Buddhists sects wear a red cap. So it could be that it also spread into China from Siberia too. Or an even more tantalising option, that it began in China and spread into Europe via Siberia. Which would also lead us to question whether in China, Psilocybine was in fact once used, but was abandoned as a result of widespread domestication of the pig, and as a result of agriculture in general in prehistory.

But they certainly used that other weed, it grows, I have been told, prolifically and with gay abandon along virtually every roadside.



posted on Apr, 20 2012 @ 08:01 PM
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"buddha" is a false god.

John 14:6 Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.

There is only one, true, living God.....Jesus Christ of Nazareth.



posted on Apr, 21 2012 @ 01:19 AM
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reply to post by sputniksteve
 


OK. That was not crystal clear.

Title says "3,000 Ancient Buddhas Unearthed in China...."

I agree with you. Title is just trying to attract attention. I certainly am more attracted to the sound of 3,000 dead Buddhas (heck, 3,000 of any type of bodies!).

Thus, I am mislead. I would have never bothered to look at a thread on 3,000 statues found. Would have passed on that.

Splitting hairs? No, because it's a pandemic problem: editors and bloggers say whatever will get clicks.

Hope this is clear now.



posted on Apr, 21 2012 @ 09:40 AM
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I notice that the term "government shill" is thrown around this site to describe people with an agenda to muddy the waters of an open discussion on a variety of topics. I have to ask myself if the term can be adapted to "religious shill"? The reason I ask myself this question is because I see a ton of threads/posts discussing religion that aren't really discussions but blanket statements opposed to those that don't "believe". Most of the the time the same names appear to be the culprits behind these threads. I ask the members of ATS to check profiles and post history to determine for themselves who these "religious shills" are. The most obvious clue is when one only makes posts related to religion or quotes scriptures, especially when they have 100+ posts ...just some food for thought ATS.



reply to post by daynight42
 


I apologize if you felt mislead as it was not my intention to mislead you or anyone else, I used the title of the article as the title of the thread. I simply wanted to bring and interesting discovery to ATS for review and discussion.



posted on Apr, 24 2012 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by DissentFromDayOne
 


I know as a general rule we don't feed the Trolls, but I have to point out that the very same Jesus of Nazareth (or Saint Issa of the Indian Buddhist cannon) you so eloquently quote, in fact practiced and taught Buddhism...www.tombofjesus.com...





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