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Daniel Suelo; The Man Who Lives Without Money

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posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 10:35 AM
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Daniel Suelo lives in caves in the canyonlands of Utah. He survives by harvesting wild foods and eating roadkill. He has no job, no bank account and does not accept government welfare. In fact, Suelo has no money at all. Suelo may have shunned all the trappings of modern American life, but he is not an isolationist.

Since abandoning money in 2000, the former cook from Moab, Utah has remained an active member of his community and avid blogger. Mark Sundeen, author of The Man Who Quit Money, admits many people would regard Suelo's alternative lifestyle as bizarre. But the 2008 financial crash has led many to question the value of money. He explains some of the lessons found in Suelo's philosophy.


Many people may look down on the life-style this man has taken upon, but many of these same people live burdened lives with so much stress, they can not say they live their lives with a peaceful and clear mind as this man does. He shows the people that something can be done about the system. It's not a matter of us not being able to do nothing about the system, its that we choose not to. The small risk of losing a little comfort and security has us all in chains. The day the world will change is when the people make a stand to the illusion that is money, like this man has.

www.bbc.co.uk...



www.details.com... -and-money/200907/meet-the-man-who-lives-on-zero-dollars


DANIEL SUELO LIVES IN A CAVE. UNLIKE THE average American—wallowing in credit-card debt, clinging to a mortgage, terrified of the next downsizing at the office—he isn't worried about the economic crisis. That's because he figured out that the best way to stay solvent is to never be solvent in the first place. Nine years ago, in the autumn of 2000, Suelo decided to stop using money. He just quit it, like a bad drug habit.

His dwelling, hidden high in a canyon lined with waterfalls, is an hour by foot from the desert town of Moab, Utah, where people who know him are of two minds: He's either a latter-day prophet or an irredeemable hobo. Suelo's blog, which he maintains free at the Moab Public Library, suggests that he's both. "When I lived with money, I was always lacking," he writes. "Money represents lack. Money represents things in the past (debt) and things in the future (credit), but money never represents what is present."

On a warm day in early spring, I clamber along a set of red-rock cliffs to the mouth of his cave, where I find a note signed with a smiley face: CHRIS, FEEL FREE TO USE ANYTHING, EAT ANYTHING (NOTHING HERE IS MINE). From the outside, the place looks like a hollowed teardrop, about the size of an Amtrak bathroom, with enough space for a few pots that hang from the ceiling, a stove under a stone eave, big buckets full of beans and rice, a bed of blankets in the dirt, and not much else. Suelo's been here for three years, and it smells like it.


What a great guy.




posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 10:45 AM
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I'm already looking to follow in Suelo's footsteps. More and more are taking a step out of the system. I've done it just about the past 2 years - it is our true nature.



Soon, people will be scrambling to learn skills that will enable them to step out of the financial system.


Humans, let us reclaim our mother earth.



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 10:51 AM
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This does seem like an interesting way to live.. for someone with little to no ties with family or friends. Having a wife and child this lifestyle becomes less and less an option. I completely see the need to remove ones self from the monetary system, but in order for most people to do such a thing a large investment is needed upfront. If I could afford some land and solar panels I would be out there too.. making my own way. Its hard to take that jump when there is nothing to jump into.
edit on 19-4-2012 by psychonautical because: spelling



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 10:55 AM
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reply to post by FermiFlux
 


Thanks for bringing this story to my (and others) attention here. this guy has the right idea. the system has us in chains because we choose to be a part of it.

Now I would never go as far as this guy has... A few things I just refuse to give up, my home, electricity and internet access in my living room. If I wasn't married though and didn't have my wife to think about, I just might. I am sure she would leave me if I suggested we move to a cave.

We can all follow his example though, without going to his extreme. We can grow our own food, make our own clothing, repair things instead of buying new, keep old working items instead of buying new cool gadgets, etc...

My goal is to lower the importance of money in my life, being unemployed (for 3 years next January), it is a good plan whether I prefer it or not, luckily I do. Self sufficiency is a real goal of mine. Living right outside the city, it isn't the easiest thing to do but I can take steps in that direction, to lower my reliance on money, lower my cost of living and lower my need for others to take care of my needs by supplying me with money in exchange for work. One day I will have my house in the country.

Last summer I entirely ate what I grew in my backyard, with the random pizza or steak thrown in when I could afford it. We all have many more options than the standard 40 hour work week, exchanging time for money, but I don't think everyone prefers the other options despite not liking the one they choose.



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 11:17 AM
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There is a gentleman who lives in our area with a family, who refuses Federal Reserve Notes (ie, money). However, his extended family provides him with a cell phone, a car, and a place to live. They pay for all these things, including electricity for his mobile home and gas for the car, cell phone service, etc.

Somebody has to provide at least a few things. For instance, Suelo has pots and pans. He has buckets of beans and rice (neither which grow in the deserts of Utah), paper and a pen or pencil to write.

He may have had the pots and pans to begin with. The buckets of beans and rice either came from a donor (who paid for it in cash), or from a food pantry which runs on donations. Pens and paper have to be either "borrowed" from the library or somebody gave him some.

There is always a hitch in this lifestyle. He may be living "money free", but where is he living? On federal land, or private land? He subsists on donated material, along with what he finds. What happens when his clothes get holes in them, or he needs a new coat? Donations.

Although his lifestyle at first seems idyllic and carefree, keep in mind that people who work and have money are providing him with land to live off of, foodstuffs, etc. Somebody has to be the intermediary between his carefree world and the world the rest of us are stuck in. So, unless he works for what he gets, bartering physical labor for goods, he's just a glorified bum.



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 11:28 AM
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I find it funny he is wearing designer clothes and glasses...

Think about that one for a bit before you retort.

If we all lived like this, do you think there would be complex manufacturing of even simple items like glasses?

We cannot all live like this...we can live more simply and more self sufficient, with less of a corporate sell out society, but we cannot expect to have even simple luxuries like eye correction if we all lived like Daniel.
edit on 19-4-2012 by abeverage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 11:36 AM
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I applaud the guy for doing what he can but he does not live without money. Someone paid for all the stuff he is freely given. IOW people work in the system to provide him with so called free things but they are only free to him not those who traded their labor for them. And of course if you have a family you can't just go live in a cave etc. Well you could but it would be a lot more stressful then living in society.

If we could just get rid of property tax a lot of people could be very self sufficient and literally live without money much more comfortably then this guy. Its not necessarily money that is the problem its fiat money from nothing and the government stranglehold of taxation on everything that is the main problem.

People will always barter things of value for their labor or each other whether it is goods and services or gold and silver etc. Nothing wrong with that. We just need to stop the government theft/taxation and their forced monetary system and stranglehold on our lives. Government/mafia is the problem not the solution!

I think the transition to a more free society is already underway with things like 3d printers and open source manufacturing etc. which will break the stranglehold of corporations on the economy and still provide us with technology we can use.. Still government is in the way and running interference for the politically connected corporations.


edit on 19-4-2012 by hawkiye because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 11:42 AM
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Money is not our problem, never was. DEBT is the evil. DEBT DEBT DEBT. You can live free when you don't owe. I paid off all debt at the age of 35, house, car, loans ect. I'm not rich nor do I get paid alot. My wife is a stay at home mom and we save.

Example. Last week my wife was looking for new clothes for our 3rd child, a boy. We have 2 older girls so hand me downs are out. She found a lady on craigs list Giving away free boys clothes. When she unpacked the free bag she found out that all the clothes were named branded like gap and hilfiger ect. Many had their price tags still on and had never been worn. Some of the jeans were $30 !!!!! She said to me "who would pay $30 for a baby set of jeans?" I said "someone who can't afford them because people are dumb and have large credit"


The truth is you don't have to live in a cave. You just have to be responsible.



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 03:59 PM
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it only
takes
courage



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 04:17 PM
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i have read about this invividual before , and to be blunt he is a parasite

questions :

how long would he last if moab shunned him ?

how long would they all last if the intere porulation of moab [ 4,779 at last cencuse ] decided to ` join him ` ?

he survives only because he has the saftey blanket of a charitable town

his " strategy " is not a solution to anything



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 07:46 PM
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reply to post by FissionSurplus
 


Only an idiot would live that lifestyle and refuse donations. The point of his story is that he could survive without donations, and without a pencil or the use of the public library he blogs from. So making him out to be someone who subsists thanks to other people's charity isn't exactly accurate. As for the land he lives on, the idea that anyone owns that land is a joke.

Skimming over the rest of the replies in this topic. You Ayn Rand worshippers need to grow some morals.
edit on 19-4-2012 by Lazyninja because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2012 @ 11:05 AM
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barely any american could do this



posted on May, 4 2012 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by FermiFlux
 


another alternative, one that i am working on, is being debt free. having the minimum needed for life. an occasional nice thing isn't bad. as long as it isn't charged on a credit card.

i'm close i don't have any credit card debt, my little car is paid for, no loans. i have a couple of debts that will be done in four years.

i don't stress any more between paychecks. i can go to have a cup of coffee without pulling out a credit card. i can buy a package of socks without charging them. i don't have to sacrifice eating for clothing or medical care. it's a nice feeling to not "need" my job.

the experience has changed my perception towards work and "things".

i don't know if i can survive wilderness living. i would break down the second i had a tooth ache. the idea does intrugue me. i think that we can work towards living like this. taking small steps towards a moneyless life.
like.....

start with simple camping:
bring food, camp stove, tent, "smores", and water. take some rope and a book on knots. learn how to care for your knife.

day hikes:
pack a small lunch. get use to the terrain in your area. learn the trails, ask questions bout the local plants.

backpack:
start off with dried foods and filters for water. slowly take away these comforts and integrate what the seasonal wildlife has to offer you to eat. try spring time, summer, fall and winter hikes. each one will provide unique challenges and opportunities.

back country hike:
the same as back packing.

extended stay - back country hike:
take a minimum of items. living off the land as much as possible. try a week or two if possible.

after all this, you will have some preparation to live off the grid. you go from survival to wilderness living.

i'm on step one.



-subfab



posted on May, 4 2012 @ 04:25 PM
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No matter how much some may want to put this guy up on a pedestal, he is a hypocrite, a leech and a free loader.

He has given up everything, yet he maintains a "free" blog from a public library.
Nothing is free not even a library and when he gets sick I'm sure he will get "free" healthcare, paid for by the great American tax payer.
If he really wants to earn real respect he should renounce everything the modern world has to offer, that includes an internet blog site.



posted on May, 4 2012 @ 08:12 PM
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reply to post by Alxandro
 


my guess is he will one day decide to write a book, or teach a course on how to survive out of the system. and charge lots of money for it. i would if i had the chance.

-subfab



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 04:41 PM
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I'm already looking to follow in Suelo's footsteps. More and more are taking a step out of the system. I've done it just about the past 2 years - it is our true nature.


I hope you read this part carefully before making that decision: Daniel Suelo lives in caves in the canyonlands of Utah. He survives by harvesting wild foods and eating roadkill.

I don't think many people are comfortable doing that, especially vegetarians. And would it really be an ample supply of (pretty unhealthy in any case) food, considering you never know where some animals are killed?

Live in a cave and eat roadkill. What a dream life!



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 04:46 PM
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Originally posted by Kargun
Money is not our problem, never was. DEBT is the evil. DEBT DEBT DEBT. You can live free when you don't owe. I paid off all debt at the age of 35, house, car, loans ect. I'm not rich nor do I get paid alot. My wife is a stay at home mom and we save.
.


Money IS debt.

I didn't know it was possible not to know that in 2012..

Secondly, you are never in debt to any financial institution, according to this site:

yourstrawman.com...

As far as the general gist of your post - you are correct. Neither borrower or a lender be. Don't lend or borrow money. Don't promise (like - don't "promise to pay"). Let your speech be "yes, yes" or "no, no". Because no one knows the future, and promises are lies about the future (even if they come true, because at the time of the promise, you did NOT know whether it would come true or not, because you did not have future in your control - only the present time).

But the thing is, if you think you have debt, but actually don't - wouldn't you want to know about it?



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 04:46 PM
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reply to post by FermiFlux
 


What would he do if he broke a leg, got a toothache? I'm going to watch the video now. It'll probably answer my question, and I hope that answer isn't 'We pay for his medical.'

Update: I just watched it. He didn't quit money. He quit holding money.
He has bread and canned food and anything people will donate - that was purchased with money. Not knocking the guy, but this is called freeloading.

He goes to the library to use the computer - Hulloooo, purchased with money. The electricity to run the computer costs money.

edit on 6/13/2012 by jiggerj because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 04:51 PM
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Originally posted by Kargun
Money is not our problem, never was. DEBT is the evil. DEBT DEBT DEBT. You can live free when you don't owe. I paid off all debt at the age of 35, house, car, loans ect. I'm not rich nor do I get paid alot. My wife is a stay at home mom and we save.


EDIT: Oh, I thought the post of mine above got deleted, so I wrote a new one, somewhat similar, but a bit different in other parts. I will leave it anyway, because it does have some differences.. sorry for the repetition though..

The general point that you are making is true. Don't lend, don't borrow. We were taught this 2000 years ago. We ignored it and started worshipping the murder weapon of the messenger instead (the cross).

We were also taught never to PROMISE. Always keeping our speech straight, either "yes, yes" or "no, no".

We ignored it and formed churches and different sects and cults to worship the murder weapon, paint an image on it on flags and started killing for christ (knights Templar, for example), and forming a debt-, and interest-based "money system", which is basically pure Usury that we were also warned against.

Somehow I think this could have gone a little differently, if we had actually LISTENED to the teaching, instead of focusing on the messenger and glorifying his murder (and worshipping the murder weapon)..

I hope this time the message goes through.


edit on 13-6-2012 by Shoujikina because: (no reason given)

edit on 13-6-2012 by Shoujikina because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2012 @ 05:34 PM
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Originally posted by Shoujikina


I'm already looking to follow in Suelo's footsteps. More and more are taking a step out of the system. I've done it just about the past 2 years - it is our true nature.


I hope you read this part carefully before making that decision: Daniel Suelo lives in caves in the canyonlands of Utah. He survives by harvesting wild foods and eating roadkill.

I don't think many people are comfortable doing that, especially vegetarians. And would it really be an ample supply of (pretty unhealthy in any case) food, considering you never know where some animals are killed?

Live in a cave and eat roadkill. What a dream life!


actually if you know anything about "roadkill" much of it is edible if you get if "freshly killed"..... I know it sounds gross but it depends on how the animal was hit. I have picked up fresh whitetail deer kills along the road if I knew they were fresh (about an hour or two old in the winter) but I if I needed dog food and my dogs were starving... They would get road killed deer along with me.
edit on 13-6-2012 by fnpmitchreturns because: (no reason given)




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