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Could a microwave save your electronics during an EMP attack?

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posted on Apr, 21 2012 @ 05:47 PM
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As has been pointed out with a car, the microwave would probably have to be grounded, independently of the electrical system, for a microwave to be effective as a Faraday cage. Consider buying a ground rod, getting the local gas, hydro, and cable/phone company to mark their lines, and driving in a independent ground rod, to ground/shield a room or small cage if you are truly concerned about an EMP. In the area where I live, it is common for people to buy a used "shipping" container, I have considered this myself, and grounding it independently of any electrical supply, I would think this would make a decent ready built Faraday cage, inconspicuous to a degree as a garden shed.




posted on Apr, 21 2012 @ 06:00 PM
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If a microwave will save your electronics from an EMP - could an old fridge do the same.

In the movie Indianna Jones 4 (The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull) - Harrison Ford put himself into an old fridge to protect himself from an atomic blast - and it worked. I know it is a movie - but sometimes ideas in movies do work.

We use an old fridge to store DVD's, and other valuables. A lot of people I know are storing their valuables in old fridges. Just curious if it would work with an EMP.



posted on Apr, 21 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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I have often wondered about how well a all metal tool shed type storage building would work against EMP. How well would a generator or motorcycle be protected against EMP when stored in a grounded all (no windows) metal out building.



posted on Apr, 21 2012 @ 06:23 PM
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bubble rap,foil and a cardboard box .. technically you could make a room in to an EMP proof zone using common household products and a quick Google search ... if ya into that thing

edit on 06/-05004/2011 by sitchin because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 21 2012 @ 09:04 PM
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I have an awesome idea!!
Build your home inside of a huge microwave and never worry about an emp ever again!
now a question?
If not shielded and a microwave would work as a faraday cage, does that means that microwaves will work after an emp?



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 11:11 AM
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Originally posted by g146541
I have an awesome idea!!
Build your home inside of a huge microwave and never worry about an emp ever again!
now a question?
If not shielded and a microwave would work as a faraday cage, does that means that microwaves will work after an emp?


The electronics that create the microwaves and the control circuits are outside the microwave shielded part of the oven, else they would be destroyed when used.
So again, it comes down to distance from the blast point and the number of barriers between that determines how much EMP a household will receive outside what comes through the electrical grid.

A microwave is not a perfect Faraday cage and some EMP will come through, but it will act as a barrier reducing the amount of EMP to the objects within it.

Unplugging everything in your house if you have enough warning will reduce the amount of EMP those devices receive, but not all of it. The next determination is how much metal surface area a device has or is connected to for EMP to pass through into the circuitry.

The design and hardiness of electronics has also changed since the mass testing occurred decades ago. Not due to EMP concerns , but other factors have caused certain safeguards to be incorporated into electronics devices that may have the side effect of helping them survive and EMP blast.

There are multiple factors involved when it comes to EMP, as such no real practical answers. Sure we can talk about making your house a Faraday cage or other such grandiose things, but in the end that is just impractical.

Devices close to ground zero will surely be destroyed, but as we get further away from the blast point, less damage will occur. The mathematics of this are exponential and do not take into account barriers (natural or artificial).

I guess the only solid, practical answer is to be as far away from the blast point as possible, and have plenty of barriers between.

edit on 22-4-2012 by Dreamwatcher because: Repeated word



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 04:47 PM
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reply to post by Dreamwatcher
 


My bad I should have put a sillytag or some other joke warning.
Believe none of what I say and only 25% of my facts, this is ATS after all.



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 04:52 PM
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Excellent, thought provoking post, OP. S&F.

No idea of the physics, but wouldn't it be cool if something as simple as a microwave oven can thwart an EMP pulse?



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 04:54 PM
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Originally posted by g146541
I have an awesome idea!!
Build your home inside of a huge microwave and never worry about an emp ever again!



Of course, you'll have to hope that no one plugs your home in for 2 minutes on the "high" cycle!




posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by babybunnies
 


Why??
A lil spf 45 and some shades and I'm a shoe in for any reality show on mtv.



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 05:27 PM
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reply to post by Whatsreal
 


maybe the internet wouldnt be down though surely they would have prepaired for an emp

and if not whynot



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 07:34 PM
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I guess the part I'm missing in all of this is (assuming that 1) The microwave works to protect whats in it, and 2) your electronics are in the microwave at the time of an EMP blast)...........
....what are you going to do with (your electronics)? Even if you have a generator to power them/charge the batteries, your cellular network is likely down, making your "smart" phone pretty "dumb", etc.
Don't get me wrong, I've thought about the EXACT same thing, but remember to be realistic about your capabilities even if your own preparations work.




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