High RPM to Low RPM, Motor-Generator: Public Discolsure - The Real McCoy

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posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 09:56 PM
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Hi,

I am proud to go public, and share the findings of my group. This is a simple example of over-unity ready for America now. The video I am sharing, is crammed full of information you need to know. Also, please visit the link to the overunity forum, to read the questions I have already answered.

Thanks,
Pierre

[B]Youtube Link:[/B]
High RPM to Low RPM, Motor-Generator: Public Announcement - YouTube

[B]Overunity.com link where I answered questions:[/B]
High RPM to Low RPM, Motor-Generator: Public Discolsure - The Real McCoy




posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 10:08 PM
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OK so if I am reading your Overunity.com posts right you are saying that by pairing a two pole high efficiency one horsepower magnetic motor with a multi pole generator setup through reduction gearing that you can produce more watts than your one horsepower motor consumes?

Am I correct so far in my thinking?



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 10:17 PM
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reply to post by roguetechie
 


That's correct. And your going to want both the motor and generator to be three phase. Due to the higher efficiency of three phase motors. And if the prime mover is an induction motor, then you will want it to most likely be four pole instead of two pole. Due to the fact that four pole induction motors are usually more efficient than two pole induction motors.

But everything you said is essentially correct, from a conceptual point of view.
edit on 15-4-2012 by bradagilah because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 10:22 PM
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Too often in the past legitimate technology is killed off in more ways than one and almost as often charlatans play on our hunger for this technology.

Here's hoping for a change of pace.



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 10:26 PM
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OK so hypothetically say I am starting with a one horsepower low torque electric motor what size of generator should I attempt to run? Would I attempt to run a 1.5 horsepower generator from this one horsepower motor and if so is this how i gain more output than input?

Also do you have running prototypes?

Sorry for all of the questions here... I am a first year engineering student with a deep interest in alternative energy and new technology. I must say your solution seems very simple but if it works it would be amazing.

If you do have a working prototype could you please specify the exact motor, generator, and gear ratio combination you are using.

Also about how many watts in are you putting versus the wattage that is being output from the generator?



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 10:35 PM
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Am I correct so far in my thinking?


Sorry to be the bringer of bad news, but this is a sham.

The multi-pole generator can't produce as much power as you put in as there will always be losses in the system.

Score one.....Laws of thermodynamics.



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 10:47 PM
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It sounds like what you are doing is creating a form of magnetic resonance?

I'd like to know, have you published a working prototype with measuring devices that people can see a demo or video of?

~Namaste



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 10:51 PM
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Originally posted by OccamAssassin



Am I correct so far in my thinking?


Sorry to be the bringer of bad news, but this is a sham.

The multi-pole generator can't produce as much power as you put in as there will always be losses in the system.

Score one.....Laws of thermodynamics.


What is the scope of the "system"?

You're inferring that it is closed inside the workings of the generator, which may not be the case. If there is another physical process that transfers energy from the environment, the system is more "open" and still not in violation of the laws of thermodynamics. All parts of the system have to be considered. If you take from the surrounding air, how open does the system become?

Score one for an understanding of physics.

~Namaste



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 10:55 PM
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reply to post by roguetechie
 


Good question, no need to apologize.
Let's say for instance, we are working with a non-looped setup. Then I will cover the concepts involved in looping... The generator, even with an energized prime mover connected to it, will not produce any electricity, until it is loaded down. If the generator is loaded, then the resistance of the load will determine current draw from the generator. The generator and the motor both having service factor ratings. These ratings indicate how far out of specification you overdrive either before damage is likely to occur. A typical service factor rating is 1.25. If your generator is rated for 1.5 horsepower, and your prime mover is rated for less, then you don't have to worry about overworking the generator. The horsepower and newton meters of torque the generator are rated for are just indicators of what the generator can handle mechanically and electrically, before damage is likely to occur. If your prime mover is only 1 horsepower, that is not a problem. It just means that's all the prime mover is rated to supply to the generator before stalling or breaking. Now, I highly suggest hooking your prime moving up to a Variable Frequency Driver, for several reasons. The large capacitors in the VFD improve efficiency of the motor by forming a tank circuit, and the intelligent circuitry inside of the VFD, also improves efficiency of the motor, by intelligently managing the power going into motor, so current draw is less when the torque is not needed.

And to reaffirm, as long as the generator head your using is high efficiency (meaning built properly in so many words), and is a high pole count, of a recommended 24 poles or more, and this is connected and geared to a prime mover that is say four poles and highly efficient, and the gearing is correct you'll have overunity. Also, be sure to use a VFD on the prime mover, and here's another reason why... Even when not loaded, the prime mover will draw a lot of current if it's an AC induction motor. Essentially you are producing torque that is not being used, so if you hook it up to the generator head like this, then you won't get over-unity unless you put a large enough load on the generator head. If you straight up loop the system, you don't have to worry about that scenario. How I typically do it, is I rectify the three phase power coming off of the generator head, and output it directly into the DC bus of the VFD. And the VFD is also hooked up to the wall, or an inverter for starting. As soon as the system gets up and running, I just disconnect the wall power power. Simple as that. And in case the voltage off of the generator is a bit higher than the VFD likes, I use an off of the shelf voltage regulated to regulate the rectified 3 phase AC intelligently.

Take a look at this image I made: desmond.imageshack.us...

With an electrical engineering background, and bench experience, it's all easy to do. I may have to do some videos, with myself and one of my engineers at the bench going over all these concepts.

Let me know if you have any more questions, I am willing to answer them and get deep into this.



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by OccamAssassin
 


Go ask a major motor company for the specifications of a 24 pole count or higher permanent magnet generator head. And just go off of their specifications. And then go lookup the specification of a high efficiency 3ph four pole AC motor. In case you don't want to go to all that work, I did it for you. Refer to the bottom link, which will take you to an image.

desmond.imageshack.us...



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 11:01 PM
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reply to post by bradagilah
 

Hi.

Can this thing start (and do what you are saying) without having to be plugged into the wall first?



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 11:02 PM
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Originally posted by loveguy
reply to post by bradagilah
 

Hi.

Can this thing start (and do what you are saying) without having to be plugged into the wall first?


From what he's explaining, no... it needs to get to a certain resonant frequency first.

But I'll let him answer that.


~Namaste

ETA: It needs external power to start... which is why I answered no, but a battery can substitute for a wall socket.
edit on 15-4-2012 by SonOfTheLawOfOne because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 11:06 PM
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Originally posted by SonOfTheLawOfOne

Originally posted by loveguy
reply to post by bradagilah
 

Hi.

Can this thing start (and do what you are saying) without having to be plugged into the wall first?


From what he's explaining, no... it needs to get to a certain resonant frequency first.

But I'll let him answer that.


~Namaste


It can start without being plugged into the wall. Just use a battery and an three phase AC inverter.

There are no resonant frequencies involved. The gearing just has to be correct so that the volt/frequency patterns match.


P.S. In response to SonOfTheLawOfOne: I didn't produce a video of a unit in operation, I figured the specs off of AO Smith, Baldor, Leeson, would be enough. Videos are easy to fake though. What I think is the best idea, is to have some credible individuals from ATS just come visit one of my workshops on location for a live demo, and then they can vouch for everything, and film. Someone suggested this on another forum.
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posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 11:13 PM
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reply to post by bradagilah
 


Just with your quoted specs on the generator and squirrel cage motor.

The specs are input specs.

So.....as an example.....if a squirrel cage motor is a 1kW and has an efficiency of 85%......we only see (at an absolute maximum in ideal conditions) 850W at the output shaft.

The same goes for generators. The generator will only operate at maximum efficiency in ideal conditions, typically not, what you would find in most operating environments.

Gears will introduce loss.

Any heat generated indicates loss.

Any sound produced indicates loss.

Any loss = wasted energy.



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 11:14 PM
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reply to post by bradagilah
 


Those frequencies that you are talking about matching, I guarantee you are a form of either a harmonic frequency or some sort of resonant frequency, which is enabling them to "sync" up if I'm understanding you correctly.

Getting someone to vouch for the authenticity of your claims would be an excellent idea, and someone who has a strong background in engineering and/or physics.

~Namaste



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 11:15 PM
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Finally found 24 pole generator heads ... now trying to find one in a size range where I can compare inputs and outputs.
edit on 15-4-2012 by roguetechie because: edit to add: new information contradicts old information



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by OccamAssassin
 


Agreed.


~Namaste



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 11:33 PM
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reply to post by OccamAssassin
 


lol. I like this part. This is where having a background in electrical engineering would help you all. Otherwise it's your Achilles heal.

I do not recommend using, an AC induction motor that is single phase - it is not efficient enough. Second there is a square root of 3 power lift off of the generators rating, due to the fact that it is three phase. Each phase produces 5kW off of the generator specs provided. So when the three phases are combined together into single phase, there is a square root of 3 lift in power, and this is due to the interacting phase angles. Also, the generator I provided specs on, produces, 1291 watts per horsepower, and again, these ratings are from an ISO 9000:1 certified manufacture.

Also the number your quoting at 81.9% stands for power factor. The power factor is easily corrected to unity using capacitors, and the electrical company and motor manufactures always recommend you do that. Look up power factor correcting on Wikipedia, or in an electrical engineering text book if you don't know what it is... The efficiency of the EM3710T is 91.7% under FL load. Baldor acquired these numbers as per NEMA standards. In addition, Baldor is an ISO 9000:1 certified manufacturer, and uses very exacting test equipment, and they measure a wide floor sample to get an accurate mean average of performance for the motors name plate. The full load rating of the EM3710T is 4,324 VA for 7.5 HP, which translates to 576 VA per HP. (which also has a square root of 3 lift due to it being three phase [996 watts])

If you watched the video all the way through, I covered how you are unlikely to find a 24 pole generator head from a Google search, you need to get in touch with the major motor/generator manufactures directly. High Pole count generators are used in high end wind applications, and hydroelectric. High pole count generators were not intended for the average DIY market, a 5kW 24 pole gen head, can weigh 1 ton. That is the weight of the gen head I provided specs on. You need a forklift for this equipment.
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posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 11:39 PM
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yeah I'm a starving engineering student (mechanical not electrical engineering alas). Hence why i was looking to find a smaller generator head to do the comparisons with. To put it bluntly I flat don't have the money to spend on a one ton generator head (nor anywhere to put it even if I got my hands on one). If this is something that can only be replicated on fairly large equipment I'm afraid that leaves me priced out of this game. However if you're ever in or around Oregon look me up I'd love to hear more about what you're doing and how you're doing it.

You seem to be pretty confident and competent which is rare for Free energy inventors. (Well the competence part anyway)

If you can point me in the direction of the absolute smallest equipment I could use and still get the effects you are seeing I'd surely appreciate it though. (if nothing else it gives me a budget to shoot for)



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 11:46 PM
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reply to post by bradagilah
 





Also the number your quoting at 81.9% stands for power factor.


I was giving an example .....I wasn't quoting your specs.

...and yes I am well aware of 'power factor' and how it is corrected.

Would you like to explain to all of us how you can only correct the power factor for a limited operating range?

If the load on the generator is going to be dynamic......correcting the power factor is only going to be efficient at one particular load.





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