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linux virus help

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posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 02:43 PM
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i've seen a few threads on here about linux being safe because there are not a lot of users,

so, can anyone point me to a recent linux virus, maybe a trojan or two, a self replicating worm ?

even with a small (and small does not mean a couple of users, its used relative to windows) user base then you would expect a couple of virus's,

then i would like someone to explain how it would run,

oh, and just in case, can someone do this in laymans terms so everyone can understand




posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by solvectra
 


theres alot of difference between viruses/malwares/worms and while some systems are harder to infect with one i'd say that you should always assume that given enough interest someone will find a way to get inside

like any system i'd recommend running anti virus/malware software on it as a precaution..as just like like you can consider connecting to a website like having sex with it and it you dont have any protection you could catch something nasty



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by Maxatoria
reply to post by solvectra
 


like any system i'd recommend running anti virus/malware software on it as a precaution..as just like like you can consider connecting to a website like having sex with it and it you dont have any protection you could catch something nasty


I am so quoting this, its hilarious and oh so true



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 03:02 PM
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reply to post by solvectra
 

Linux malware is a good place to start. I don't know if the article mentions it but part of the reason that virus and suchlike have such a hard time on Linux is because a) Desktop Linux machines often have less "services" running than a comparable Windows PC and thus less attack vectors. b) Linux does not run user programs using admin privileges, unlike Windows. c) Linux (really only the so-called "kernel" which is mainly responsible for talking to the PC hardware, loading drivers for said and starting other basic programs) and the surrounding software vary (in version number) so much that often once a vulnerability has been discovered it is quickly patched, meaning solved. Hope it helps.


edit on 15/4/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: Clarification



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 03:40 PM
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Just because the majority of Malware is projected towards Windows dont mean that linux or mac dont have any. And TBH it works the same way as any other piece of malware, it uses system hooks to catch data and stores it in encrytped hidden files. Thats assuming that it is any good.
edit on 15-4-2012 by definity because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 11:21 PM
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I run Ubuntu and have had no problems.

Sometimes I click on the links in emails that I assume will attempt to load a virus, just to see what will happen.

If anything, the computer will freeze and restart. After the restart, no issues.

I suspect, installing anything on a linux system is so complicated, that the virus are not able to install themselves. And also, the guys that write them run linux, so as not to infect themselves, they write for windows.



posted on Apr, 16 2012 @ 12:55 AM
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Originally posted by kawika
I run Ubuntu and have had no problems.

Sometimes I click on the links in emails that I assume will attempt to load a virus, just to see what will happen.

If anything, the computer will freeze and restart. After the restart, no issues.

I suspect, installing anything on a linux system is so complicated, that the virus are not able to install themselves. And also, the guys that write them run linux, so as not to infect themselves, they write for windows.


In fact "installing anything on a linux system" is usually much simpler - in respect of "hidden" processes - than on windows. You simple copy binaries and other support files in its respective directories and updates library links. On windows the process is almost same + meddling with registry. Registry are one of gravest troubles of windows. If I apply KISS, there is no reason for registry. I can see some advantages of approach: lets have all settings of all OS and apps in one database. But time and/or MS proved this approach have at least huge trade offs.



posted on Apr, 16 2012 @ 06:40 AM
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so,

is anyone going to point to a recent outbreak ?

maybe just one infected machine, there has to be one somewhere,



posted on Apr, 16 2012 @ 11:16 AM
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Have you tried using google?

List of linux virus



posted on Apr, 16 2012 @ 03:26 PM
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The main reason Linux users do not get these is simple. In Linux, most of them, anyway, you have two accounts, one is Administrator, one is User. User can do things Administrative, but only after inputting the password. In Windows, you are the Administrator, and can do anything. Another glaring reason is most malware/trojans are exe files, and Linux cannot handle such a file, not without Wine being installed. My stepson plays online games on here sometimes, and I find strange exe files and source code in my download folder. I just delete it.



posted on Apr, 17 2012 @ 10:04 AM
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reply to post by autowrench
 



Originally posted by autowrench
The main reason Linux users do not get these is simple. In Linux, most of them, anyway, you have two accounts, one is Administrator, one is User. User can do things Administrative, but only after inputting the password. In Windows, you are the Administrator, and can do anything.


In windows you can have more than just the administrator account as well. Its just that most people dont bother to set up a separate user account when they first use their windows system.

Also in any windows system after vista (vista,win7,server 2003 r2) it kind of works the same way as as Linux. Even an administrator has 2 modes of operation. in these systems most of the time an admin is operating in a standard user mode which has limited rights on the system. When the admin tries to perform an administrative function (usually has a small blue and yellow sheild next to the function) they are informed that this function requires admin privileges and are asked if they want to continue. So this is the same process as in Linux , its called User Account Control (UAC). Also when the system asks for admin authentication the entire operating system is put on hold (the screen is greyed out) and all other fuctions are stopped so that it becomes impossible for a hacker to script an automatic response to the popup box. There are also several settings that can be tweaked by the Admin to customize the level of UAC that is offered in these decisions and when to ask for elevation of user rights.

But of course you could just create separate user accounts that do not give admin privileges to safeguard your windows system (for children or guest users etc). If you do that then you will be asked for an admin password if you do something the requires that level of authorization. So thats exactly the same as the linux system. This will work for all the windows operating systems.



edit on 17-4-2012 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-4-2012 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 18 2012 @ 01:26 PM
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Originally posted by PhoenixOD
Have you tried using google?

List of linux virus


have you seen the dates - and read the comments ?


If you are going to trade files in a Windows world, you'll need to scan those files for viruses. You won't get infected, but you may help infect someone else

this is a nice comment at the bottom of the page from under "the reality"



posted on Apr, 19 2012 @ 12:37 PM
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reply to post by PhoenixOD
 

Yes, true. But when one installs Windows, the first question asked is for a name, and that name become Administrator. Even if a user account is made, the user cannot do hardly anything, and, unlike Linux, an Administrator password is never asked for to do an Administrator task.
I am posting right now from Fedora 17 KDE (Beta), I am in a user account. I can fire up a Terminal, (CMD to you Windows users) and I can update my OS by inputting an Administrator password. I can configure my network in the same manner, or my firewall settings. A normal user cannot do these things without a password. I cannot even boot up without inputting a 16 number/letter character passphrase If I wish to alter a file, I have to log out, and log in as Root. Anyone on my computer as a normal user cannot access my Home partition unless they know yet another passphrase.
My Hard Drive Partitions are Encrypted also, along with my Home. My cookie file is saved in either plain text, or a photo, and when I close Firefox, all cookies, temp files, history, and cache are gone. When I shut down, all TEMP, temp and *temp* files, and non secure logs are deleted. I have this all set up, it works on automatic. I could do the same, near the same with a Windows computer, but not in an automatic way, it would be all manual. Windows, by default, saves almost EVERYTHING.



posted on Apr, 22 2012 @ 03:37 PM
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Here is the developer site for a linux virus scanner that is accessible from the Ubuntu software center so it is probably legit.

clamtk.sourceforge.net...

I am running Ubuntu, will try it out and let ya know if it finds anything.

Update: After first installing it scans only the small files in the home directory. After upgrading, you can select to scan everything. Trying that now.
edit on 22-4-2012 by kawika because: add text


It found 5 bugs, all in the Chrome directory.
edit on 22-4-2012 by kawika because: add text


After it finished is listed the files found and gives you a choice to quarantine or delete each one.
edit on 22-4-2012 by kawika because: add text



posted on May, 10 2012 @ 06:09 AM
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Never had any issues with viruses or malware in my 3 years of linux use (mostly ubuntu/mint). The one thing that got me into trouble was trying to install anti-virus software. Not sure if it was the above-mentioned Clam..but after the installation my computer would not shut down, and when manually switched off it never booted up, just totally froze. Sorry for not being able to give more details, it's been a while since.
By no means do I advocate against using anti-virus software for linux and I think my problem was between the chair and the screen, not linux.

These days I'm using FireFox in private mode and use BleachBit or the janitor function in Ubuntu Tweak to clean the cruft
It's incredible how much space you get back by just cleaning your browser properly. Can be a GB or two just from a days surfing..
(Perhaps it's time to teach wifey how to enable private-mode surfing, too
)



posted on May, 10 2012 @ 09:16 AM
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I heard that, friend. I too have never had any luck with Clam, or Klam in KDE, and really see no need for it. I have been running Linux in one form or other for almost 8 years now, after my computer got invaded by a determined cracker, who then made sure all of my friends on my contact list also got invaded. All I did was piss someone off in an Internet Forum.
As for sex sites, I think you guys are fooled here. My adult son often surfs for porn, and downloads videos to his personal folder. I have never experienced one problem with any site he goes to. Java Script is the culprit, just disable it, or severely restrict it like we do.
NoScript



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