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Young Children and Horror Movies: Possible Abuse?

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posted on Jan, 19 2013 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by JBurns
 


Sorry, but child development doesn't fit with the idea you can explain everythingawat. Young children especially are extremely literal. They lack the ability to differentiate between fact and make believe until they are older.




posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 05:50 AM
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OP, I did a little bit of research and it seems I do owe you an apology. I'm sorry for jumping to that conclusion so quickly. It turns out, as you said, they can't really tell the difference. I should look into things more before making an assumption.


I'm sorry



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 07:55 AM
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Originally posted by JBurns
OP, I did a little bit of research and it seems I do owe you an apology. I'm sorry for jumping to that conclusion so quickly. It turns out, as you said, they can't really tell the difference. I should look into things more before making an assumption.


I'm sorry


No worries.

I don't know if anyone, in the history of ATS, has ever apologized. I'd applaud you if I could.



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 08:09 AM
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Unless you have a single child, where you can protect them all and win, this is kind of moot idea teachers have, its the pink bubble idea. An example of 3-5 kids, spread out over 12 years means your 5 year old is going to watch what your 17 year old watches, and your 17 year old will definitely get invovled and tell you your a control freak if you try to get involved. Never mind, with 3-5 kids, you will have all their friends over constantly, and they will also have sleep overs.

I read articles about children, and it pans out to being much like my own situation, where 1 or 2 children, parents are in charge, my oldest 2 did chores and got along. Anymore and kids are in charge, its a kids camp.

And its not abuse, its the world we live in, and what they, the group of kids, consider trendy or hot or cool at the time. They have their friends sleep over, they watch things on youtube, play games, then act them out. If you forbid horrors, or violent shows, like I try to, they definitely watch them late night or at another house, or on their hand held devices, and then act them out, and delight in scaring each other, and one upping each other, boys do anyway.

Its quite the thing! But the abuse is done by the media and PTB, the only parent that would be able to win on these issues would be extremely strict and I would feel sorry for children being raised in that.



posted on Jan, 21 2013 @ 08:25 AM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


I understand what you are saying.

My parents were very strict about what we could watch. Of course, we didn't have cable where I lived, so it was easy to keep us away from the horror shows.

However, I was reading Stephen King by second grade. I snuck the books home from the towns library and read them under the covers of my bed. Gave me many a nightmare, too.

Kids will find a way, no doubt. I just don't understand why some parents seem to make it so easy for them.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 07:30 PM
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Originally posted by Unity_99
Unless you have a single child, where you can protect them all and win, this is kind of moot idea teachers have, its the pink bubble idea. An example of 3-5 kids, spread out over 12 years means your 5 year old is going to watch what your 17 year old watches, and your 17 year old will definitely get invovled and tell you your a control freak if you try to get involved. Never mind, with 3-5 kids, you will have all their friends over constantly, and they will also have sleep overs.

I read articles about children, and it pans out to being much like my own situation, where 1 or 2 children, parents are in charge, my oldest 2 did chores and got along. Anymore and kids are in charge, its a kids camp.

And its not abuse, its the world we live in, and what they, the group of kids, consider trendy or hot or cool at the time. They have their friends sleep over, they watch things on youtube, play games, then act them out. If you forbid horrors, or violent shows, like I try to, they definitely watch them late night or at another house, or on their hand held devices, and then act them out, and delight in scaring each other, and one upping each other, boys do anyway.

Its quite the thing! But the abuse is done by the media and PTB, the only parent that would be able to win on these issues would be extremely strict and I would feel sorry for children being raised in that.


In a lot of families, what you describe is pretty accurate. It doesn't have to be, however. I have several that are pretty spread out (oldest is 19 now, and youngest is 9), and there are still restrictions on what the younger kids watch. For a lot of movies, if we aren't sure, we will watch them first, no kids in the room, and decide. The younger ones know that some things aren't right for them, because we didn't simply state, "You can't watch this.". Instead, we explained that some of the movies are very scary, and some have gross stuff in them (and none of them want to see "gross"). They understand that a really scary movie or show might make them have bad dreams. As the older one (and before him, another older one) matured, more options were opened up. This system works so well for us that the teen actually monitors the stuff the younger kids watch, too. He's more strict, in cases, than I would be.
Basically, it is possible to monitor, even with several kids, spread out in ages.

As for abuse, well, if a kid watches something with friends, that the parents didn't approve, clearly, that isn't abuse. Parents simply cannot be everywhere, all the time. When parents take their children to see seriously graphic movies, however, that's another issue. Violent gory movies and kids just don't mix.



posted on Jan, 23 2013 @ 07:34 PM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl
reply to post by Unity_99
 


I understand what you are saying.

My parents were very strict about what we could watch. Of course, we didn't have cable where I lived, so it was easy to keep us away from the horror shows.

However, I was reading Stephen King by second grade. I snuck the books home from the towns library and read them under the covers of my bed. Gave me many a nightmare, too.

Kids will find a way, no doubt. I just don't understand why some parents seem to make it so easy for them.


That's the key; parents that "make it easy". Sure, kids will sneak things. Parents can't monitor them 24/7. it's the parents that deliberately expose their kids to anything and everything that I have issues with. Kids walking into movies that are full of blood and guts violence, with their parents, is abusive, IMO. I am not talking teens, either, but small children, under ten. I have seen that. Of course, one issue ther eis the stupid ratings system. A lot should be NC-17 that only gets an R.



posted on Jan, 31 2013 @ 05:54 AM
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I think that having loving caring parents is all that a child needs. Abuse from a love one, or stranger for that matter is indeed very harmful, but comparing that to a horror film just belittles the importance of just having loving caring parents.

Horror films / video games are far removed from reality, and although a child could have a few sleepless nights it is laughable that any damage is really done. Children are incredibly tough and intuitive and many dont give them enough credit.



posted on Jan, 31 2013 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by Thommmy
 


Loving parents is a definite bonus.

But, as to the rest of your post, I'd like to quote someone from above in the thread.




OP, I did a little bit of research and it seems I do owe you an apology. I'm sorry for jumping to that conclusion so quickly. It turns out, as you said, they can't really tell the difference. I should look into things more before making an assumption. I'm sorry


I'm not trying to be argumentative, but there's a ton of research about how literally young children take things. I know...its my chosen field of study. And children aren't nearly as resilient as people like to believe. The early years are the formative years....and will have a major impact on the child for the rest of her life.



posted on Feb, 7 2013 @ 01:39 AM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl
reply to post by Thommmy
 


Loving parents is a definite bonus.

But, as to the rest of your post, I'd like to quote someone from above in the thread.




OP, I did a little bit of research and it seems I do owe you an apology. I'm sorry for jumping to that conclusion so quickly. It turns out, as you said, they can't really tell the difference. I should look into things more before making an assumption. I'm sorry


I'm not trying to be argumentative, but there's a ton of research about how literally young children take things. I know...its my chosen field of study. And children aren't nearly as resilient as people like to believe. The early years are the formative years....and will have a major impact on the child for the rest of her life.



The biggest key is the age of the children. Above a certain age, they can learn, but even some older kids have difficulties with some things. Plus, even if a child can "understand" that this or that is fake props, makeup, and the like, they can still be affected psychologically, and that can be for the long term. Plus, there is simply no reason to have kids below a certain age watch some of the movies in the first place. It doesn't make someone cooler (parent or child) for the kid to have seen the latest bloodfest. Some kids might not even turn out to be the sort that likes such movies, even if the parents do. They should be allowed to make their own decisions, once they are grown up, on such things.



posted on Feb, 19 2013 @ 09:43 AM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


I am totally against it and my children are scared and worried even if they see a trailer. These films are made for grown up children and adults. I don’t see any benefits in letting my kids watching such films.



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 07:03 AM
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I started watching horror at about 5-years-old when I began watching reruns of Dark Shadows. I wasn't scared whatsoever, even then I actually wanted to live among the characters. Then at age 7, I watched A Nightmare on Elm Street for the first time and from then on I was obsessed with horror (hence the reason for my username). Not all kids are the same so I don't think every child should be restricted from watching horror movies. Some can handle it, some can't. Some can tell the difference between reality and fantasy, some can't. I personally think it would be better to start children off with classics such as Frankenstein, Dracula, The Wolf Man, etc. because they are less gory and violent than modern horror films. They should wait until 10, 11, or 12 to watch the really violent stuff.



posted on Feb, 28 2013 @ 07:15 AM
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The first horror movie i ever watched was "The Exorcist" . I was well into my teens when i watched it. I never watched " Texas Chainsaw Massacre" and never really cared for horror movies in general. This might explain why I think your all NUTS!! and i am the only well adjusted human on the planet!






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