It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Turtle friendly gardening

page: 1
7

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 11:39 PM
link   
Source here

Article about someone who remodeled their patio, noticed a turtle coming up looking for the now filled in "bog garden". Notes about how to make your yard and garden turtle friendly.


Fortunately, gardeners can play a role in nurturing box turtles. Here are a few actions to consider:

• Invite box turtles into your garden by cultivating a plant species native to your region that provide favorite turtle fruits. In sunny areas, encourage dense clusters of brambles and let the ripened berries fall. Choose species that fruit at different times during the season. (But be aware that the turtles have a well-known penchant for raiding vegetable gardens, so erect a small barrier.)

• Terrestrial box turtles are poor swimmers, so be sure your pool is properly fenced in.

• Leave large, continuous areas of natural leaf litter mulch beneath trees on your property so the turtles can remain camouflaged and forage for prey. To provide places where the animals can pass the night or overwinter, build brush piles on top of soft, loose soil by layering branches and leaf litter.

• Any moist area, whether rain garden or damp forest depression, will help turtles survive the hottest parts of the day.

• Provide a large, and preferably isolated, clearing. Box turtles use such areas for traveling, mating and basking. They also lay their eggs in sunny spots.

• Locate all turtle habitat as far as possible from deadly roadways. If you do see a box turtle crossing a street, the best thing to do is to move it carefully to the side of the road, pointed in the direction it was heading.

• Before mowing, walk the area in search of turtles. Mow on a dry day, at midday, when turtles are less likely to be out and about.




posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 12:33 AM
link   
reply to post by kawika
 

"I like turtles."



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 12:47 AM
link   
reply to post by LightSpeedDriver
 




Had to be done.

Cool thread OP. I had friends near Seattle that let the turtles roam in the garden. Believe in the summer. It was always fun to try and find them. I think they're cute. If there were turtles nearby I would definitely make a turtle friendly garden.



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 12:52 AM
link   
reply to post by Domo1
 


Yup, have not spotted any turtles here in So Ca.

Grew up in Michigan, lots of turtles.

Daughter found a salamander in the garden in Michigan. Teacher told her we must have good soil for him to live.

Dad used to pick them up from a boat on the lake where he grew up.



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 01:05 AM
link   
We have a turtle we call spot that has lived in our garden for a couple of years now.

The kids next door found him, and took him to their dad, who, for some reason, painted him with the permament markers that automotive people use to mark used car parts, so Spot has yellow and purple writing on his shell.

We got really upset when the kids told us that, and we went and got him from their yard and put him in our garden and fed him.

We've seen him for 2 years now, several times a month, always around our patio, usually after the hot part of the day is over. There's a tree there with the leaves, and there's monkey grass that he likes to get in. We've seen him eating spinach and lettuce. We don't mind, lol, that area is home to our chickens so it isn't the main part of our garden. We just plant brocoli and veggies for the chickens to nibble and bok choy and spinach for the bees to have something to eat on in the fall.

I have a lot of begonias in that area- turtles and chickens alike seem to LOVE begonias. I put them in clay pots so I can give the flowers a break by rotating them out, otherwise Spot and the chickens would nibble them down to the ground.

We call him spot, because, thanks to that idiot next door, he is easy to spot. That's why we rescued him- we were not sure he would make it on his own painted permamently like a neon sign. It's faded off some, but it is still there the last time I saw him.
edit on 15-4-2012 by hadriana because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 01:30 AM
link   
reply to post by kawika
 


I revert to kid brain when I find wild animals. I found a little lizard a few months ago hanging out on a log on a mini hike. I was the stereotypical nature moron and picked him up. Gorgeous little creature. Oh man, want to find a pic and post it. He was gold, and didn't look like a Salamander. Ugh, looking through phone after I post. Also found a salamander walking my dog (the salamander wasn't walking my dog, I just don't get commas). They are so fun to see! Where I grew up there was a pond so I would go catch frogs and tadpoles. Frogs I let go, tadpoles I would put in a decent sized aquarium and watch them grow into frogs. Then let them go. So neat to see. Damn't I want a turtle garden! Really cool thread for anyone with turtles nearby. Where are turtles? Florida?



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 01:45 AM
link   

Originally posted by hadriana
We have a turtle we call spot that has lived in our garden for a couple of years now.

The kids next door found him, and took him to their dad, who, for some reason, painted him with the permament markers that automotive people use to mark used car parts, so Spot has yellow and purple writing on his shell.

We got really upset when the kids told us that, and we went and got him from their yard and put him in our garden and fed him.

We've seen him for 2 years now, several times a month, always around our patio, usually after the hot part of the day is over. There's a tree there with the leaves, and there's monkey grass that he likes to get in. We've seen him eating spinach and lettuce. We don't mind, lol, that area is home to our chickens so it isn't the main part of our garden. We just plant brocoli and veggies for the chickens to nibble and bok choy and spinach for the bees to have something to eat on in the fall.

I have a lot of begonias in that area- turtles and chickens alike seem to LOVE begonias. I put them in clay pots so I can give the flowers a break by rotating them out, otherwise Spot and the chickens would nibble them down to the ground.

We call him spot, because, thanks to that idiot next door, he is easy to spot. That's why we rescued him- we were not sure he would make it on his own painted permamently like a neon sign. It's faded off some, but it is still there the last time I saw him.[edit]edit on 15-4-2012 by hadriana because: (no reason given)



Awww! I like turtles! I would love to see one crawling around my garden. A little garden friend. Maybe you could camo him back to his original coloring, make him not so noticeable to predators. I've heard that painting turtles shells is not healthy for the turtle, but the damage is done, might as well cover over the neon to make him blend better. Perhaps with natural nail polish....there is none I have found that is completely free of harsh ingredients, wait, there is....its called Piggy Paint. It doesn't last as long as regular nail polish, but I was impressed with it given the fact its almost all natural. Decent color selection. I bought some for my niece and I. A couple other brands are Santé, which I have not tried. And Zoya, comes in lots of colors. o(())~
edit on 4/15/2012 by Miss Sile because: added turtle... o(())~

edit on 4/15/2012 by Miss Sile because: (no reason given)

edit on 4/15/2012 by Miss Sile because: tried to fix text separation. doesn't look that way on preview, what's going on?



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 01:48 AM
link   
Sounds great if you have them in your area,they look cute.

Some Turtles Are Terrifying,I`m glad these guys only eat jellyfish.



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 01:51 AM
link   
reply to post by Domo1
 





Where are turtles? Florida?



Four species are native to North America. The eastern box turtle, Florida box turtle, Gulf Coast box turtle and three-toed box turtle are all subspecies of Terrapene carolina. The ornate box turtle, Terrapene ornata, ranges primarily in the prairies and Southwest; the spotted box turtle, Terrapene nelsoni, is native to the Sonoran Desert; and the Coahuilan box turtle, Terrapene coahuila, the only truly aquatic species, lives just in a single valley in Mexico’s Chihuahuan Desert.




posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 01:58 AM
link   

Originally posted by kawika
reply to post by Domo1
 





Where are turtles? Florida?



Four species are native to North America. The eastern box turtle, Florida box turtle, Gulf Coast box turtle and three-toed box turtle are all subspecies of Terrapene carolina. The ornate box turtle, Terrapene ornata, ranges primarily in the prairies and Southwest; the spotted box turtle, Terrapene nelsoni, is native to the Sonoran Desert; and the Coahuilan box turtle, Terrapene coahuila, the only truly aquatic species, lives just in a single valley in Mexico’s Chihuahuan Desert.



In New York, we also have Painted Turtles (totally awesome) and Snapper Turtles which are aggressive and will mess you up!! You can lose some fingers pretty quick...a couple summers ago, I was biking on the concrete path near the river, and there was a GIGANTIC snapper sunning himself right in the middle. It was cool, I got off of my bike and gave him a wide berth so I didnt scare him and make him run or charge. I studied him for a while, he looked at me and baked in the sun, I did the same, we went our separate ways.



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 02:17 AM
link   
I've found a few turtles in my yard over the years. I have to relocate them because my dogs will hurt them, so i keep a good eye out for them.

I've got lots of toads. The same ones are here every year and mate and i have thier tadpoles in my pond. I keep a good eye out for them and make sure they thrive. A few of them have become quite tame and will take food aka bugs right from my hand. They wait on my deck for me at night.
My dogs don't bother the toads. After the babies leave the pond , i have at least 30+ babies all summer. It takes me forever to cut the lawn because i have to go collect them all and release them when I'm done cutting the grass.



posted on Apr, 15 2012 @ 02:58 AM
link   

Originally posted by Domo1
reply to post by kawika
 


I revert to kid brain when I find wild animals. I found a little lizard a few months ago hanging out on a log on a mini hike. I was the stereotypical nature moron and picked him up. Gorgeous little creature. Oh man, want to find a pic and post it. He was gold, and didn't look like a Salamander. Ugh, looking through phone after I post. Also found a salamander walking my dog (the salamander wasn't walking my dog, I just don't get commas). They are so fun to see! Where I grew up there was a pond so I would go catch frogs and tadpoles. Frogs I let go, tadpoles I would put in a decent sized aquarium and watch them grow into frogs. Then let them go. So neat to see. Damn't I want a turtle garden! Really cool thread for anyone with turtles nearby. Where are turtles? Florida?


Ha! That was funny...salamander walking your dog, I thought that's what you meant at first, like maybe you had a tiny dog and you had tied string around Sally-The-Mander. I know what you mean about reverting to a kid when you find wild life. Me too. Snails in a mud puddle, lizards peeking out from leaves. Or the occasional being chased by a rattle snake, furry best friend by your side, running for dear life, screaming like a little girl; which I can get away with! (Partly enjoying the fun, knowing it will make a great story) as you jump from rock to rock then briskly charge through knee high water, holding onto your dogs harness, both catching your breath and feeling so alive from the adrenalin!!!

Ps. Domo, your avatar scares and delights me at the same time, two emotions I've never felt at the same time until now!



new topics

top topics


active topics

 
7

log in

join