The weather (an observation)

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posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 06:54 PM
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I wanted to say a little something about the weather today. I live in Lincoln Nebraksa. I have lived in Nebraska a long time, seen a lot of things happen in the sky out here. I've witnessed more than my fair share of tornadoes, hail, flooding, and skies of every color.

But today were having an out break of tornadoes and heavy rains that seems strange. The temperatures just don't seem to be high enough to produce tornadoes from the experiences I have had in the past. This morning there was a heavy fog (1/4 mile visibility to an 1/8th mile or less at times and it seems to be raining way to much now for it to produce any type of tornado. Also me plus a few people at work say their ears are ringing.

just an observation...




posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:03 PM
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People with better meteorological background then me can feel free to dispute this if its wrong, but my understanding is that tornado’s spawn from storm fronts (the leading edge). They are the normally horizontal leading edge, that gets pushed down. The rain is in the center of the storm, after the front, and the whole thing resides in a low pressure system, making it colder. So the cold indicates a pressure system moved in, then you get the tornado's in the leading edge of the storm front, followed by the rain after the front passed.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:05 PM
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I think the same thing. I believe this is weather manipulation at it finest. Since when are they able to predict "an outbreak of tornadoes" a few days in advance? And be right on the money on where! CNN had a huge thing on the "storms" and said there could be hundreds of tornadoes Sat. I heard this yesterday.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:12 PM
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reply to post by AllUrChips
 

They have always been able to predict in advance when conditions were favorable enough to produce tornado's. Heck I remember the alerts on TV when I was a kid. I think that they have just gotten better at it, and more interconnected between news and weather stations between states. The Doppler radars they have now will let them see where a tornado is about to form, and actually see it when its on the ground. I believe that they got good at spotting that when they started storm chasing with mobile Doppler radar systems.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:25 PM
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reply to post by defcon5
 


Yeah I remember alerts as well, maybe a few hours in advance. I GUARANTEE you have never seen alerts TWO DAYS in advance of "hundreds" of tornadoes to hit and provide a path for them. I believe the tornadoes last year in Joplin were part of these manipulations as well.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:40 PM
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It just seems like the wrong kind of weather to even be producing storms. Then again, three weeks ago its was over 90 degrees in Nebraska. The ups and downs don't make any sense at all.

All my life living in Nebraska tornadoes only really popped up when the temps got in the 90s, maybe 87 - 88 degrees at the lowest.

It was 64 at the highest today in Lincoln, some parts of Nebraska may have seen the 70's, but still that's not typical tornado weather at all. also one storm cell is the size of Iowa at the moment. Not unheard of, but suspiciously concentrated.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:43 PM
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reply to post by SecretNebraska
 


the ears ringing part is very interasting, that sucks though that you guys are experiancing such bad weather, hope it gets better



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:49 PM
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www.youtube.com...#!

Look up the conditions for North Platte Ne. That video happened there today. For these weather conditions it is super rare occurrence of tornadoes.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:49 PM
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reply to post by AllUrChips
 
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Yeah, but you have to understand back then we didn't have as many radars, and they weren't interconnected like they are today. It used to be a big deal when a local TV station got its own radar, now they all have them. They also weren't Doppler radar back then, it was just normal radar.

You also have to expect that we have gotten better at making predictions from our years of studying these things. Back in the 70's if someone went out and chased a storm, we'd have called them nuts, now big universities send teams out to do it, because they found it helped them learn how to predict tornado formation and understand their mechanics.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:54 PM
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Originally posted by SecretNebraska
All my life living in Nebraska tornadoes only really popped up when the temps got in the 90s, maybe 87 - 88 degrees at the lowest.

The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Here, look at what a cold front is:

Cold Front
A cold front is defined as the leading edge of a cooler mass of air, replacing (at ground level) a warmer mass of air, which lies within a fairly sharp surface trough of low pressure. It forms in the wake of an extratropical cyclone, at the leading edge of its cold air advection pattern, which is also known as the cyclone's dry conveyor belt circulation. Temperature changes across the boundary can be as much as 30C (50F). When enough moisture is present, rain can occur along the boundary. If there is significant instability along the boundary, a narrow line of thunderstorms can form along the frontal zone. If instability is less, a broad shield of rain can move in behind the front, which increases the temperature difference across the boundary. They are stronger in the fall and spring transition seasons, and weakest during the summer.

Hope that helps.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 08:01 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.



See that swirly looking area out west, looks like a badly formed hurricane?
That's your low pressure system.
Look at the “L”'s on this map:

You're right near the leading edge of that low pressure front as of now, you probably were under it when the tornado's happened.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.
edit on 4/14/2012 by defcon5 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 08:39 PM
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The area where tornadoes were predicted is very large. It's easy enough to roughly forecast the weather a day or two in advance, and say the condition will be right somewhere over a large area (a tornado watch). It's much harder to forecast exactly where the tornadoes will be until just before they arrive (a tornado warning).



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 08:39 PM
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The area where tornadoes were predicted is very large. It's easy enough to roughly forecast the weather a day or two in advance, and say the condition will be right somewhere over a large area (a tornado watch). It's much harder to forecast exactly where the tornadoes will be until just before they arrive (a tornado warning).



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 08:46 PM
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I read it was only 2nd time they predicted 24 hours in advanced

Look out



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 08:47 PM
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reply to post by Uncinus
 


yea but

butt



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 08:51 PM
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Came really close last year
I was bbq with grandkids and the sky went yellow like a crayon
Lucky it skipped over us cause I was dumb



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 08:52 PM
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see stl airport damage



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 09:22 PM
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Originally posted by Uncinus
The area where tornadoes were predicted is very large. It's easy enough to roughly forecast the weather a day or two in advance, and say the condition will be right somewhere over a large area (a tornado watch). It's much harder to forecast exactly where the tornadoes will be until just before they arrive (a tornado warning).


I see you live in the tornado capitol of the west coast LA? Tornadoes are NOT forecastable within a few days, PERIOD. We get plenty of them in the mid west and trust me, they come out of nowhere.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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I'm kind of new to all the HAARP stuff, but I just wanted to post this because if it is HAARP, its nuts. I checked www.accuweather.com today just out of curiousity (about an hour ago, 8:50ish) and there were circle formations all over the radar. I took a screen shot with my phone.



Any thoughts?



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 10:33 PM
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reply to post by AllUrChips
 



Tornadoes are NOT forecastable within a few days, PERIOD. We get plenty of them in the mid west and trust me, they come out of nowhere.


"PERIOD"??

Really?

The Weather Channel: Forecasting Tornadoes


Since most tornadoes are formed in conjunction with severe thunderstorms, forecasters first must determine where thunderstorms are likely to form and reach the severity necessary for tornado formation.


Tell us --- have you ever seen a weather forecast that predicted severe thunderstorms more than one day in advance???


IF you can predict thunderstorms, and see other atmospheric trends that indicate severity, then you CAN predict tornadoes as a possibility to the associated with those T-Storms.

"PERIOD"!





 
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