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Theory on paperbound books extinction

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posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 04:23 PM
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reply to post by CX
 


Yeah will take them off your hands for $1 a book, that way they can pay the weight for the refuse services on pick-up day. That is just horrible and lame. Books will be artifacts one day, and the one, the only one that is saved after the world is destroyed is will be not the Bible, but some bad autobiography of some celeberty that many loved named the great "Snookie" from Jersey shore and when the planet repopulates to 100 million they with makes statues of her and ... well... here we go again..

edit on 14-4-2012 by AK907ICECOLD because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 04:28 PM
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As an avid book reader and collector I feel your pain. I remember spending hours browsing the shelves and bins of small mom and pop bookstores. What a treasure trove! Then came the Barnes and Nobles and other such big chains forcing the neighborhood bookstores out of business. Just like the Home Depots making it hard for the corner hardware shops to remain open I think it's inevitable that so call progress and the bottom line of the profit sheet all good things must come to an end. I'm waiting for the day when libraries will be a thing of the past due to loss of funding. That will be unbearable.


As for the hidden meaning if any .........I don't know, I guess it makes sense for Them to hide and fabricate the truth. Just the fact that they are desecrating the the sanctity of the paperback and hardcover book makes me feel so sad. Take the history books and lie all you want, but for all that is holy leave us the classics!!!



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by AK907ICECOLD
 


Ohhhh, I remember reading that series. When all the talk about the honeybees disappearing I immediately thought about that book!



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 04:51 PM
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all i know, is that i already have over a thousand physical books. i don't have enough room for more. my nook ereader has 200 books on it now. 200 books i wouldn't have room for if they were physical. it saves me space, i can carry thousands of books around with me in one little device. i think you're being just a hair too paranoid about it OP.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by AK907ICECOLD
 

in theory i'm sad about physical books becoming obsolete, but i can't stand touching paper, so i always read ebooks instead.

so long as the art of storytelling is around and being perfected, i don't care which medium it presents in, but if things continue along the orwellian path they're on, beauty will be replaced with propaganda.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 05:47 PM
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reply to post by itsallmaya
 


Yep, soon the only store will be the local police station, university, church, etc, let's just call it Costco, (or Fuddruckers, Hehehe. Its sucks that soon that when I just want to read a book I'll have to buy a computer device, n all the crap to process a book online for reading material.

Maybe, or maybe not. Time will tell, no?

Thanks



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 05:51 PM
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reply to post by optimus primal
 


Its the idea of it happening, not right away. LOL just saying its a theory.

As someone else said that some donation and places of charity take them, and quickly throw the into the trash. Who benefits from the disposal of good books? Think real hard about that for a minute, .......

Thanks



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 05:54 PM
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reply to post by AK907ICECOLD
 


so every time someone throws away books, it's the PTB trying to dumb down the public?



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by Bob Sholtz
 


I would read a ATS book, but as time goes on, its just easier coming here


I'm not a book freak, just throwing out ideas and a theory about the possibility of book extinction, could happen, maybe not. BTW most book readers I see always have lotion by them, more women than men


Thanks



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 05:58 PM
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reply to post by optimus primal
 


Your not seeing the bigger picture that I may be posing. I'm more on the side of the power of knowledge stored in books over the history of mankind. some books we could do away with. I'm not trying to be anal about, just throwing out ideas.

But I do get what your saying.

Thanks


ADD: every time I see Idiocracy I think of America's future (funny) but a loss of knowledge is what I'm getting at. did you read the whole thread??
edit on 14-4-2012 by AK907ICECOLD because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 06:44 PM
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Personally, I see e-books in the same light as the invention of the printing press. The sudden access to information and entertainment has really got the authorities worried, as ideas are being spread (or can be spread) around the world in an instant).

Printed books had become far too expensive (still are - between R100 and R200 for a new bestselling paperback) so as a child it was a very special day when I was able to acquire another (used) Asimov or Douglas Adams for my collection.
Here is a link to leading South African stationery store so you can verify my statement for yourself:
CNA

As a speed-reader from a young age, I was frustrated the Municipal Libraries where I could only take 4 books a week (eventually I joined 3 separate libraries, and used my parents library cards as well)

Of course if we don't want the books/knowledge to be changed, we can just print a personal copy. Personal printers and/or photocopy machines won't help with costs, but lets face it - some books are priceless. Another option is to burn a cd or dvd backup now and again (and they can last a long time if properly looked after).

Decentralization of all this knowledge is a good thing for humans - we can learn from the lessons of the destruction of the Library of Alexandria and the deliberate destruction of Mayan and Aztec knowledge.

Gone forever.

Edit to add:
The first thread that catches my eye after writing the above was Vatican and Oxford University share ancient texts online

I love the synchronicity of the universe.

edit on 14/4/2012 by deltaalphanovember because: added link to another related ATS post - in short trying to be an intolerable know-it-all



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 06:56 PM
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reply to post by deltaalphanovember
 


Nice post friend, speed reading huh, so the e-books must be a benefit. four books a time, must have been back in the day.
I tried to learn how to do speed reads, that's hard to do with pages, I was never talented enough to do it.

Thanks



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by AK907ICECOLD
 


You have no idea how much I read now (love these pixel books!) ... and if I am really mindblown by a particular book, I will then buy the original paper hard copy for my personal collection. This way I ensure I have a copy of the ones that have meaning for me.


cheers



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 08:33 PM
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OP, some of the ideas you present are similar to the plotline of a favorite book of mine, A Canticle for Liebowitz. In this (fictional) story, the world has been destroyed in nuclear flames, but a small group of monks dedicate their lives to collecting and copying books to try to save the knowledge that was lost. They don't have any idea what they are copying, only that it was somehow important to the last civillization. After many years (centuries) of dark ages, humans once again develop nuclear technology and once again, manage to destroy everything.

Personally, I hate reading on e-readers. Gotta have a book in my hands for full enjoyment. I guess it's no different from the purists who still listen to music on vinyl; it's not the same when heard on a CD. Interestingly enough, a decade or so after the demise of records, there are still many bands and labels producing vinyl LPs and lots of kids (teenagers, young adults) are buying them. My point here is that I don't think hardcopy books will ever completely die out; they may not be the predominant form of print knowledge soon but there will always be a small segment of society that prefers paper.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 08:43 PM
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reply to post by deltaalphanovember
 


Nice, I feel the same way, that when a good read or my interest peaks, i always go to buy the hard bound book. Bit don't forget to bury into the mountainside when the meteor hit
. One day someone may think its the new-aged Dead Sea Scrolls. Really I'm not kidding, could happen, no?



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 08:53 PM
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reply to post by AK907ICECOLD
 


Is this my Dad???
!!!

You are on the right track, I will have to look into that book for a good read. Sounds good, that was a awesome reply but as semi-young as I am I still prefer the CD over a cassette, viynal or some you said?? what's that's?


I joking. On a serious note, yes the Dark Ages could had been fiction stories or maybe non or a mix of books by authors or story tellers, or maybe written by celebs 10,000 years ago, how the hell does anyone know?, did you read my reply about "Snookie" on the first page. this could happen (shaking head)



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 09:09 PM
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reply to post by babybunnies
 


By the way I got a A+ for that course, it was very easy.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 10:05 PM
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reply to post by AK907ICECOLD
 

Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn have been banned from libraries already. But the current trend of digitization has been long predicted in order to prevent people from questioning management decisions.


Johnathan, Johnathan, Johnathan, Johnathan, Johnathan, Johnathan!
edit on 4/14/2012 by reitze because: +commentary



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 10:15 PM
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My observation from traditional printing to digital media has been the decline of proofreading and proper punctuation. I cringe at the misspelled words and misuses!

While I use my electronic dictionary and thesaurus, I have noticed discrepancies in on-line encyclopedias. When I want real facts, I go to the real paper books.

I agree; the demise of real books would be a way to erase much that was real, in more ways then one.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by AK907ICECOLD
 


It would be a good move to keep certain things from circulating, and it may be inevitable if this digital trend continues. Paper books may become more like pieces of art. "Oh, look, it's one of those paper books." I hope paper books stay. Sneaky spying is very easy when everything is digital, and that is another thing the control freaks love -- convenient spying. If everything is digital, there ain't a single way to prevent them from tracking what everyone is reading. (OK, it may still be, but it's more difficult to get material digitally without it being traced to you.)

There will be so many ways this "all digital" trend could be sold to the public. Even if publishers had to lose money, it could be done just to spy on everyone, i.e., to know what we're all reading. "Save a tree by going all digital!" Sick bastards will say anything to maximize profits while giving us less. (Ever notice all those paperless billing offers but never a reduction in junk mail from the same companies??)

That said, I ask, Is there anything in circulation now that they consider dangerous material? I think they have that all locked up by now. We all know the Vatican has secret archives. I'd love to get my hands on some of their treasures (if I could read them in the first place).



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