It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Six moons of Saturn in one shoot...

page: 1
15

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:38 AM
link   



How many moons does Saturn have?
So far 62 have been discovered, the smallest only a fraction of a kilometer across.
Six of its largest satellites can be seen here, though, in a sharp Saturnian family portrait taken on March 9. Larger than Earth's Moon and even slightly larger than Mercury, Titan has a diameter of 5,150 kilometers and starts the line-up at the lower left. Continuing to the right across the frame are Mimas, Tethys, [Saturn], Enceladus, Dione, and Rhea at far right.
Saturn's first known natural satellite, Titan was discovered in 1655 by Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens, while most recently the satellite provisionally designated S/2009 S1 was found by the Cassini Imaging Science Team in 2009.
Tonight, Saturn reaches opposition in planet Earth's sky, offering the best telescopic views of the ringed planet and moons.


Sources:
- APOD
- Rafael Defavari

This great view of Saturn and six of its moons were taken South Sao Paulo by Rafael Defavari using the following camera and telescope:
* Camera DBK21AU618.AS
* Lens Celestron C8 SCT
* Focal Length 4000mm
* Shutter Speed 1/30 sec
* Aperture f/50
* Taken March 9th 2012




posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:40 AM
link   
Those words were obviously photoshopped on. I call "fake."



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:54 AM
link   

Originally posted by DJW001
Those words were obviously photoshopped on. I call "fake."


Didnt you know if you look thru a telescope all heavenly bodies have a little identity sign?


BTW: amazing pic.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 07:55 AM
link   
hehe! Love your avatars guys!
Astronomy lovers....

edit on 14-4-2012 by elevenaugust because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 08:20 AM
link   
That looks an awful lot like computer imagery to me. But if it's real, what a gorgeous picture!



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 09:12 AM
link   
Awesome shot!
Maybe it has been post processed,but still its an amazing image.
The scope used is very reasonable in price too-£800 without a tripod.

I want one!



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 09:18 AM
link   

Originally posted by elevenaugust

Larger than Earth's Moon and even slightly larger than Mercury, Titan has a diameter of 5,150 kilometers



Since they took Pluto off the planet list for being so small, wouldn't that cause Titan to become an actual planet since it is bigger than Mercury?

Who decides these things?



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 09:34 AM
link   
reply to post by HandyDandy
 



Since they took Pluto off the planet list for being so small, wouldn't that cause Titan to become an actual planet since it is bigger than Mercury?


No, because Titan orbits Saturn, not the Sun. Planets, by definition, orbit the Sun. Bodies that orbit planets are called "satellites" or "moons." Titan could accurately be called a "world," as it is a large planetary body with complex geology and atmospheric phenomena.


Who decides these things?


The IAU.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 09:41 AM
link   
reply to post by DJW001
 


But Titan does actually orbit the sun. It just does so while symultaneously orbiting Saturn.

But, I understand what you are saying.

A planet would be a body that orbits the sun, while a moon is a body that orbits a planet while orbiting the sun.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 12:30 PM
link   
Thats an amazing shot of those bodies. Great timing too!



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 02:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by HandyDandy
reply to post by DJW001
 


But Titan does actually orbit the sun. It just does so while symultaneously orbiting Saturn.

But, I understand what you are saying.

A planet would be a body that orbits the sun, while a moon is a body that orbits a planet while orbiting the sun.



I get what you are saying.

But we forget that a World, orbiting a planet ( a moon ) could actually be inhabited like we here on earth.

not saying now or even in the past , but because of it's size, it could be the home for a species of future humans maybe.

I think soon we will realize that moons are just as active as planets and are not much different except in size.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 02:52 PM
link   
reply to post by LucidDreamer85
 



But we forget that a World, orbiting a planet ( a moon ) could actually be inhabited like we here on earth.


On the contrary, after Mars, Titan is considered by exobiologists to be one of the most likely places in the Solar System to find extraterrestrial life!



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 03:10 PM
link   
I had this already loaded, dramatic photo of 6 moons of Saturn, and the rings.




It's a busy system out there.

*on* OH wait! That can't be 'real' there are no stars in the sky, *sarcasm off*
edit on 14-4-2012 by Illustronic because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 03:29 PM
link   

Originally posted by DJW001
reply to post by LucidDreamer85
 



But we forget that a World, orbiting a planet ( a moon ) could actually be inhabited like we here on earth.


On the contrary, after Mars, Titan is considered by exobiologists to be one of the most likely places in the Solar System to find extraterrestrial life!


I'm leaning towards Enceladus, the 'Tiger Striped' Saturnian moon. It's activity isn't as poisonous or volatile as Titan's, with 'our' chemistry in mind. I might be wrong but I believe an Enceladus atmosphere has recently been detected/imaged.



posted on Apr, 14 2012 @ 10:15 PM
link   


I'm named after the moon of Saturn...

How cool is that?




top topics



 
15

log in

join