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Blasting sound heard around coventry

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posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:41 PM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth

Originally posted by OliArtist
Can somebody explain how Typhoons flying from Oxfordshire (Brize Norton?) to an incident at Bath would have created a sonic boom that was very clearly heard and felt in Coventry and as far north as Staffordshire (according to local news here)?

Go to Google Earth. Brize Norton to Bath - about 50 or so miles in a straight line. Fair enough. But Coventry is about 100 miles out of the way. Sure, the Typhoons may have looped around there afterwards to make the flight into a bit more of a training sortie, but they wouldn't have been supersonic at that point. They were only authorised to go supersonic overland during the 'emergency' dash to Bath.

Something is not right here.



I agree, the county map agrees......


THANK YOU! I am getting so exasperated by people misreading my question. I know a sonic boom isn't a one-off - it happens for as long as the plane is flying supersonic. But the footprint of it is smaller the lower the altitude also. The MoD itself says the jets took off from Oxfordshire and went supersonic to Bath. From Brize Norton in a straight line that's only 50 or so miles - and they were intercepting a helicopter - hence they were flying low!

So, again, I ask the people who keep ignoring the elephant in the room, why was Warwickshire Fire & Rescue Service and West Midlands Police investigating many, many calls about a loud booming and rattling in Coventry? Why were the reports from Staffordshire?




posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by ShayneJUK
 


Sky News said MoD said the jets came from Oxfordshire. That's who. If they didn't then it seems there is a right mess somewhere in terms of getting a story straight.



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by ShayneJUK
 


So why send Aircraft from Lincolnshire at supersonic speeds and cause all this hoohaw? if it was that important I imagine they have some planes down south where the capital is where the queen and all the politicians are?

If not why keep all the "good" planes in Lincolnshire? There's nothing but cabbages to "protect"



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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The jets, based at RAF Conningsby in Lincolnshire, were already on route by the time the pilot realised his mistake and switched to the correct one. An aviation source close to the incident, said: "It was caused by a helicopter transmitting a hijack code which triggered the launch of the two Typhoons.
"Supersonic flight was authorised by London Military Air Traffic Control which is only allowed in exceptional circumstances over land." The MoD response was standard procedure after receiving such a signal, officials said. But such was the extent of the noise that homes started to shake across Coventry, Rugby and Leamington as hundreds of residents rang police and emergency services. Meanwhile, residents around Bath and Swindon reported seeing the fighter jets performing manoeuvres in the skies overhead.



www.telegraph.co.uk...



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:45 PM
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Originally posted by ShayneJUK

Originally posted by OliArtist
Can somebody explain how Typhoons flying from Oxfordshire (Brize Norton?) to an incident at Bath would have created a sonic boom that was very clearly heard and felt in Coventry and as far north as Staffordshire (according to local news here)?

Go to Google Earth. Brize Norton to Bath - about 50 or so miles in a straight line. Fair enough. But Coventry is about 100 miles out of the way. Sure, the Typhoons may have looped around there afterwards to make the flight into a bit more of a training sortie, but they wouldn't have been supersonic at that point. They were only authorised to go supersonic overland during the 'emergency' dash to Bath.

Something is not right here.



Who said brize? beeb are saying they came from coningsby north lincs which IS the home base for
the typhoon squadrons so with a bit of altitude they could funnel a band of booms across most of the Midlands
and oxfordshire.


I'm with you ShaneJUK

RAF Conningsby to Bath via direct flight cuts the area exactly............
edit on 12-4-2012 by PurpleDog UK because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:47 PM
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If this was not a drill,which I still suspect is the case,well
WHO was in the helicopter?
Must have been someone important.

If it was not a drill that is.



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:47 PM
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Originally posted by noface
reply to post by woogleuk
 


So this happened in Norwich the other night?

www.eveningnews24.co.uk... ook


And our honest friends over at The Sun have the best story by far:

www.thesun.co.uk...




Now aint that a thing! even if the sun vid is fake its makes a nice cover for anything "actually" happening
move along folks nothing to see here..



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:48 PM
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Originally posted by PurpleDog UK

Originally posted by ShayneJUK

Originally posted by OliArtist
Can somebody explain how Typhoons flying from Oxfordshire (Brize Norton?) to an incident at Bath would have created a sonic boom that was very clearly heard and felt in Coventry and as far north as Staffordshire (according to local news here)?

Go to Google Earth. Brize Norton to Bath - about 50 or so miles in a straight line. Fair enough. But Coventry is about 100 miles out of the way. Sure, the Typhoons may have looped around there afterwards to make the flight into a bit more of a training sortie, but they wouldn't have been supersonic at that point. They were only authorised to go supersonic overland during the 'emergency' dash to Bath.

Something is not right here.



Who said brize? beeb are saying they came from coningsby north lincs which IS the home base for
the typhoon squadrons so with a bit of altitude they could funnel a band of booms across most of the Midlands
and oxfordshire.


I'm with you ShaneJUK

RAF Conningsby to Bath via direct flight cuts the area exactly............
edit on 12-4-2012 by PurpleDog UK because: (no reason given)



Yep, Conningsby to Bath would explain the fuss. Mind you, if the MoD had to 'investigate' this for 2 hours before being able to answer, and then the news is all reporting they came from a different direction, then it is a bit of a farce. How funny things are round here.

Probably should have just sent up a Lynx from Yeovil. Not the end of the world today then.



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:49 PM
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reply to post by noface
 


Thanks for the other sonic boom story, interesting read, but.......

Please, for the love of god don't post links to the Sun, unless it is page 3, but that would be against the ToS.



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:49 PM
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reply to post by Silcone Synapse
 




On Thursday night an MoD spokesman said: “We can confirm that a small civilian aircraft was transmitting inadvertently on an emergency frequency at approximately 1810. “Two typhoons from the Quick Reaction Alert (QRA) responded accordingly and authorisation was given from them to go supersonic which resulted in the sonic boom. “There was no actual threat to the civilian aircraft and they soon rectified their mistake.” It remained unclear last night what action was being taken against the pilot. It is the second time this year that a sonic boom has been created by a Typhoon aircraft.




www.telegraph.co.uk...



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:50 PM
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reply to post by PurpleDog UK
 


I'm from Lincolnshire and live in Swindon so I can also agree that makes sense but still don't buy either the reason or the fact that wiltshire is full of raf bases that are closer, if it was so important why send jets from 2oo miles away?

was there not a similiar thing re 9/11 and jets from miles away scrambling when there where closer ones available?



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 


Yeah I know, sorry. I just thought I'd add a bit of fun to story. The fact that the person 'recording' the video from The Sun website stops recording it just as it gets interesting made me laugh so I thought I'd share.



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:54 PM
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Here is the best account from an eyewitness:



Terry Organ, from Oldfield Park, Bath, said he saw the Typhoon.

"I thought (the sound) was a commercial airliner and then I thought 'no way'," he said.

"We watched for a while and then we saw this aircraft appear and it was a Typhoon but it was flying amazingly slow and we thought it was going to come down.
'Shook the building'

"It was doing really tight, slow circles and it suddenly put on full power and the noise was unbelievable, it was really blasting it out, and then it moved a bit further on and it did another slow turn.

"My impression was that it was struggling to stay up but then he put on full power again and you just couldn't hear anything.

"The noise was terrific, I imagine you could hear it for miles."


Source



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 


I'm in Banbury Oxfordshire and heard it, It was pretty loud, sounded like an explosion of some sort. Interesting to hear it was a sonic boom. I did think it might have been as it was quite a distinctive boom.



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by OliArtist
reply to post by ShayneJUK
 


Sky News said MoD said the jets came from Oxfordshire. That's who. If they didn't then it seems there is a right mess somewhere in terms of getting a story straight.



Probably because sky are idiots beeb and the telegraph both state coningsby which is correct
not to mention coningsby IS where our QRA (fast response standby to scramble crews and planes live).

RAF bases have specific rolls brize norton is a LARGE aircraft facility it handles VC10s etc
tankers AWACS passenger flights to overseas bases etc its highly unlikely any fighters would be there.

other near by sites Fairford is a maintenance site for RAF and (shhh) "some" USAF craft
unlikely again for fast response jets to be there.

Benson is a helo training site. nope

Lynham is winding down and i dont think there are any combat ready planes sighted there any more.


Please don't think i am having a pop at you i am not it is as usual MSM spouting half cocked crap.



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 04:04 PM
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Originally posted by thefamiliar
reply to post by ShayneJUK
 


So why send Aircraft from Lincolnshire at supersonic speeds and cause all this hoohaw? if it was that important I imagine they have some planes down south where the capital is where the queen and all the politicians are?

If not why keep all the "good" planes in Lincolnshire? There's nothing but cabbages to "protect"


Because coningsby IS where our QRA (fast response standby to scramble crews and planes live).
and if required they can be anywhere in the uk in a matter of minutes.

The reason for the all eggs in one basket is down to money which is why there are a lot of other bases
either shutting down or not in a combat roll or even active airfields in some cases!



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 04:06 PM
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According to reports the typhoon was from Lincolnshire, though to answer a previous post, Fairford is still used but not for Hercs as it was it's main recent use. There are now yearly airshows there and not used for Typhoons generally.

www.bbc.co.uk...


The MoD said the Typhoons, from the Quick Reaction Alert (QRA), based at RAF Conningsby in Lincolnshire, were scrambled and authorised to go supersonic after the small civilian helicopter had emitted an emergency signal.



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 04:06 PM
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reply to post by ShayneJUK
 


So could you answer my question then? Surley it would make sense to have the quick response down south and use lincolnshire as a training base?

ok ignore that, you did!
edit on 12-4-2012 by thefamiliar because: already answerd



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 04:07 PM
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For people asking about the helicopter 'panic button' it will be a transponder that transmits the signal, almost all motorised light aircraft have these, the below link explains how easy it is to accidentally send out a distress. I assume these are being monitored and are more likely to receive a response due to the olympics:



en.wikipedia.org...(aviation)#Transponder_codes




A transponder (short-for transmitter-responder[1] and sometimes abbreviated to XPDR,[2] XPNDR,[3] TPDR[4] or TP[5]) is an electronic device that produces a response when it receives a radio-frequency interrogation. Aircraft have transponders to assist in identifying them on radar and on other aircraft's collision avoidance systems.[6][7]





Transponder codes Transponder codes are four digit numbers transmitted by the transponder in an aircraft in response to a secondary surveillance radar interrogation signal to assist air traffic controllers in traffic separation. A discrete transponder code (often called a squawk code) is assigned by air traffic controllers to uniquely identify an aircraft. This allows easy identity of the aircraft on radar.[6][7] Squawk codes are four-digit octal numbers; the dials on a transponder read from zero to seven, inclusive. Thus the lowest possible squawk is 0000 and the highest is 7777. Four octal digits can represent up to 4096 different codes, which is why such transponders are often called "4096 code transponders." Care must be taken not to squawk any emergency code during a code change. For example, when changing from 1200 to 6501 (an assigned ATC squawk), one might turn the second wheel to a 5 (thus 1500), and then rotate the first wheel backwards in the sequence 1-0-7-6 to get to 6. This would momentarily have the transponder squawking a hijack code (7500), which might lead to more attention than one desires. Pilots are instructed not to place the transponder in "standby mode" while changing the codes, as it causes the loss of target information on the ATC radar screen, but instead to carefully change codes to avoid inadvertently selecting an emergency code. Additionally, modern digital transponders are operated by buttons to avoid this problem.[6][7] The use of the word "squawk" comes from the system's origin in the World War II Identification Friend or Foe (IFF) system, which was code-named "Parrot".[9][10]




edit on 12-4-2012 by Jr2012 because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-4-2012 by Jr2012 because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-4-2012 by Jr2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 04:08 PM
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the sun story about 2 fighters chasing a ufo is over a year old, look at the date above the artical not the date at the top of the site ;-)



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