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Canada: So Long Gun Registry, Hello Body Armor Registry?

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posted on Apr, 11 2012 @ 02:53 PM
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It's easy enough to convince people who dont know any better that guns are bad. After all bullets hurt.

But convincing people that a kevlar vest is bad? Why? Because bullets hurt?



The province has started enforcing new rules that restrict the sale and use of body armour and the ownership and use of fortified vehicles.

Some citizens might wonder why the state has made it illegal for them to protect themselves from harm, particularly at a time when guns and gangs have been proliferating on the streets of Winnipeg. Link


Naturally, the preposterous assumption is made that illegality equates to unavailability:

The law is not an infringement of personal rights, but merely another measure to protect law enforcement and ensure the bad guys don't have an unwarranted advantage.


I guess they dont have crack, heroin, illegal guns (gasp! not on the registry!) or any other prohibited items up there.

So then, what's the point of the gangs if there is no black market?

I love this article:

A 44-year-old man — whom police say appears to be a collector but is not a licenced firearms owner — is facing a charge of unlawful possession of body armour.

“To my knowledge, this is the first time (Manitoba) RCMP have laid this charge,” RCMP Cpl. Miles Hiebert said Tuesday as police announced the seizure.

Other charges faced by the man include five counts of unauthorized possession of a prohibited weapon, three counts of unauthorized possession of a firearm, and unsafe firearm storage charges.
The article claims they found a submachine gun yet the focal point of the article is the body armor and the punishment it comes with. Priorities? Link
edit on 11-4-2012 by thisguyrighthere because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 11 2012 @ 03:11 PM
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I'm thinkin' the logic is if you are not a LEO then you don't need body armour.

With the old gun registry the Cops found out quickly that it was useless, they still had to approach every situation with caution because ...what do you know...crooks don't register their guns

Of course if Canadians want body armour then there will be a black market..
Canadians have a fine long time tradition of being black marketeers

Thing is, if you talk to the average Canadian, because we have a history of relying on the right tool for the job for survival in a harsh environment, you will likely find we enjoy finding other solutions to problems, other then ventilation with extreme prejudice...

Of course having said all that: we are just as plagued by retarded globalist "leadership" as everyone else is.



posted on Apr, 11 2012 @ 03:15 PM
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They banned civilian use of ballistic vests in BC back in 2010. Has there been a decrease in gang related violence? Absolutely not.

To the average Joe, it seems like a good idea. "oh yea that makes sense...if we can't buy it neither can they right? I mean, licensed stores are the only place I know of to get guns/ammo/armor." However once you realize that criminals don't buy from stores or register their guns..........



posted on Apr, 11 2012 @ 04:19 PM
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First, why call it a state?


Some citizens might wonder why the state has made it illegal for them

Provinces, territories, country... we do not have states...

How does this affect antique armor? I can't find the source for the article OP cited ... where has the Winnipeg Free Press gotten their info, I would like to read more about this issue. I would appreciate it if anyone can help me find the law's source.

Thanks in advance



posted on Apr, 11 2012 @ 04:37 PM
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reply to post by Invariance
 


Not a state. The state. As in the government. The bureaucrats who set the parameters in which you will live your life.

Some more info on the body armor regs:
www.winnipegsun.com...
www.gov.mb.ca...
web2.gov.mb.ca...

I havent seen anything referring to antique armor yet.

Would be funny either way since bullets will piece it but arrows might not yet with kevlar armor handgun rounds might not pierce it but everything else from arrows to rifle rounds will.

So we come full circle back to the law being pointless.

Okay, according to the definition outlined an old timey suit of armor would be illegal

The following garments and items are
prescribed as body armour:
(a) a garment or item designed, intended or
adapted to protect a person from puncture or
stab wounds inflicted by another person;
(b) panels or plates that
(i) protect a person from projectiles
discharged from a firearm or from puncture
or stab wounds, and
(ii) are designed to be inserted into pockets
of vests, jackets or other garments.


So would a heavy coat and a piece of wood.

Another quality law painstakingly written to make no sense and apply arbitrarily to anything they want it to.
edit on 11-4-2012 by thisguyrighthere because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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Lol just order it to washington state and drive it over heh



posted on Apr, 11 2012 @ 07:12 PM
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Originally posted by strangedays
Lol just order it to washington state and drive it over heh


Just order the Kevlar and make your own, the stuff isn't hard to weave or seal. You just need one of those vest "patterns" for sewing, just like you make a normal vest except it's multiple layers.

Cheers - Dave



posted on Apr, 11 2012 @ 07:17 PM
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we make bullet proof scoots out of kevlar
(airboats for Ice and water travel)
well the bullet proof part is a side effect of building something that can travel 160 MPH over ice for twenty years with out repair to the hull.
so any boat building supply outlet can sell you kevlar



posted on Apr, 11 2012 @ 07:28 PM
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Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
Naturally, the preposterous assumption is made that illegality equates to unavailability:

The law is not an infringement of personal rights, but merely another measure to protect law enforcement and ensure the bad guys don't have an unwarranted advantage.


Whatever you do, liberals, don't let the good guys have an advantage. After all, criminals have rights, too!

Sickening.

/TOA



posted on Apr, 12 2012 @ 04:46 PM
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reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 


Thanks for the info, I hope it doesn't become a national issue...

One wonders, though... I doubt "The Bad Guys" buy their guns and ammo at the local Bass Pro shop... I doubt they get their bulletproof armor at WalMart either.

Sad







 
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