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Homemade Propane

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posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 03:40 PM
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So...me and my friend were discussing ways of surviving out in the wilderness of you had to, without giving up the essentials. Food, water, shelter...

And heat.

He has a propane heater, but the problem is propane. He's out of propane, and so I though I'd put the question to the wilderness-savvy bushwhackers out there.

How do you make homemade propane?

The recipe I'm looking for should be made within a few hours and ready to burn within an hour of completion, using household products or grocery items...the time slot isn't exact, but just something you can make fairly quickly and doesn't need to sit overnight. If that isn't possible, then whatever you can tell me would be great. Input/output ratio is important as well.

I'd appreciate anything you could tell me. Thanks, ATS!
edit on CMondaypm535341f41America/Chicago09 by Starchild23 because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by Starchild23
 


If you can use grocery items, then why not just buy propane? It is at most stores now, and there are even automatic machines like at Sam's Club that you don't even need any personal interaction with anyone!

You walk up to the machine, put in your payment, open the gate and there is a new bottle awaiting you! You put the old bottle in and be on your way.....

Sorry if I am not answering the way you are asking though....
edit on 4/9/2012 by Chrisfishenstein because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 03:48 PM
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reply to post by Chrisfishenstein
 


Yeah...I'm thinking of a way to make propane without actually paying for propane. Something cost-effective...you know, gives you a relatively decent (not commercial grade) propane for less than what you would have paid?

Also, it's good to know how to make propane when you aren't near any stores.

I'm doing a lot of camping this summer, and it would be great to know a few tricks.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 03:52 PM
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reply to post by Starchild23
 



Because propane has natural origins, it is not "made" of other raw materials; instead, it is "found" in petroleum chemical mixtures deep within the earth. These petroleum mixtures are literally rock oil, combinations of various hydrocarbon-rich fluids

answers.yahoo.com...
Go figure, the internet has answers to people's questions. Going to get the materials at the grocery store?



1. Both processes begin when underground oil fields are tapped by drilling oil wells. The gas/oil hydrocarbon mixture is piped out of the well and into a gas trap, which separates the stream into crude oil and "wet" gas, which contains natural gasoline, liquefied petroleum gases, and natural gas.
2. Crude oil is heavier and sinks to the bottom of the trap; it is then pumped into an oil storage tank for later refinement. (Although propane is most easily isolated from the "wet gas" mixture, it can be produced from crude oil. Crude oil undergoes a variety of complex chemical processes, including catalytic cracking, crude distillation, and others. While the amount of propane produced by refinery processing is small compared to the amount separated from natural gas, it is still important because propane produced in this manner is commonly used as a fuel for refineries or to make LPG or ethylene.)
3. The "wet" gas comes off the top of the trap and is piped to a gasoline absorption plant, where it is cooled and pumped through an absorption oil to remove the natural gasoline and liquefied petroleum gases. The remaining dry gas, about 90% methane, comes off the top of the trap and is piped to towns and cities for distribution by gas utility companies.
4. The absorbing oil, saturated with hydrocarbons, is piped to a still where the hydrocarbons are boiled off. This petroleum mixture is known as "wild gasoline." The clean absorbing oil is then returned to the absorber, where it repeats the process.
5. The "wild gasoline" is pumped to stabilizer towers, where the natural liquid gasoline is removed from the bottom and a mixture of liquefied petroleum gases is drawn off the top.
6. This mixture of LP gases, which is about 10% of total gas mixture, can be used as a mixture or further separated into its three parts—butane, isobutane, and propane (about 5% of the total gas mixture).


edit on 9-4-2012 by PageAlaCearl because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 03:58 PM
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reply to post by Starchild23
 


you may want to look into gasification. Basically anything that burns can be gasified and the gas can then be used by other things like a combustion engine etc. May not be exactly what you are looking for but you should look into it.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:00 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:04 PM
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reply to post by Starchild23
 





Also, it's good to know how to make propane when you aren't near any stores.


Propane is a by product of natural gas mixed with petrolium
So for starters your gonna need some of this
Natural gas is generally many thousands of feet beneath you you might get lucky by drilling a hole
So lets say you got lucky and managed to get all the ingredients together and had a
Bowl of propane ready to go
I would love to see you trying to push/pour fill a pressurised cannister as i think this would make me chuckle somewhat
You can have a flag for this just for the facepalm i gave myself to stop laughing

Cran



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:06 PM
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I think the proper question you are asking is how to make a propane substitute from household chemicals. I dont think you care whether it comes from under the mantle or under the sink, as long as it is flammable and will heat your skillet. I'll be interested to follow the responses, while doing a little of my own research.

Right off the bat, one obstacle will be how to pressurize the gas, store inside a canister, without having access to special tools. Otherwise, you would have to forego using conventional means (e.g. screwing it onto your camp stove)
edit on 9-4-2012 by TomServo because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:06 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by TomServo
I think the proper question you are asking is how to make a propane substitute from household chemicals. I dont think you care whether it comes from under the mantle or under the sink, as long as it is flammable and will heat your skillet. I'll be interested to follow the responses, while doing a little of my own research.


Precisely. Keep me posted, please.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:07 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:08 PM
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reply to post by Starchild23
 


Propane is probably much easier and cheaper to buy, than it is to make for small scale use. If there were no propane available for sale, and I needed some, I guess it would prove useful know how to make it. Then again, I would probably exhaust every other means of heating or cooking first.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:10 PM
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Originally posted by tamusan
reply to post by Starchild23
 


Propane is probably much easier and cheaper to buy, than it is to make for small scale use. If there were no propane available for sale, and I needed some, I guess it would prove useful know how to make it. Then again, I would probably exhaust every other means of heating or cooking first.


Considering I will only be using it at night and for small time cooking, perhaps it would be more expensive to buy it.

I asked for a method that does NOT involve buying it. I will not be taking purchase of propane or theft as an answer.



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:11 PM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

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posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:12 PM
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reply to post by TomServo
 





I think the proper question you are asking is how to make a propane substitute from household chemicals.


If you were trying to survive in the sticks instead of trying and failing miserably at making your own propane
Would it not just be easier to make a

Traditional Camp Fire

Cran



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:13 PM
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I like that you would consider making your own propane. Thats hardcore.


Its not homemade propane but these guys like coal/waste oils.
www.ehow.com...



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:17 PM
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Originally posted by cranspace
reply to post by TomServo
 





I think the proper question you are asking is how to make a propane substitute from household chemicals.


If you were trying to survive in the sticks instead of trying and failing miserably at making your own propane
Would it not just be easier to make a

Traditional Camp Fire

Cran



hmmm...gather a few sticks for a fire or drill a few hundred feet into the Earth's crust....I'm gonna have to think about this...



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:19 PM
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Bingo?
Hydrogen Peroxide Combustion
I'll read the rest of this article soon, and see if I can test it.
Some other agent candidates to look into (possible combinations): Rubbing Alcohol, Bleach, Baking Soda, Citrus Juice... thinking...



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:20 PM
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Well, obviously propane cannot be made with household items, as it is a volatile organic compound, but I did find this information:


My Home-Made Biomass Gasifier

Making your own gasifier is easy I've built a lot of alternative energy projects over the years. See my home-built solar panel and wind turbine pages. I've always wanted to build a wood or biomass gasifier too. Why? Well, the internal combustion engine is really an important part of our society and the basis of a lot of our transportation and portable power technology. It isn't going to be going away any time soon. I've mastered making my own electricity from the sun and wind, but that doesn't help my truck go down the road, power the lawn mower, or run my generator on cloudy, windless days. Those all have internal combustion engines, and they all need fuel to run. I finally decided it was time to master making my own fuel. Why pay the Arabs for it if I can make a working substitute myself?

So what is a biomass gasifier? Basically is a chemical reactor that converts wood, or other biomass substances, into a combustible gas that can be burned for heating, cooking, or for running an internal combustion engine. This is achieved by partially combusting the biomass in the reactor, and using the heat generated to pyrolyse or thermally break down the rest of the material into volatile gasses.

A well built reactor will also convert combustion byproducts like CO2 and water vapor into flammable CO and H2 by passing them over a bed of hot charcoal where they will get reduced. Reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide. Reduction of water to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Thus the gasifier converts most of the mass of the wood (or other biomass feedstock) into flammable gasses with only some ash and unburned charcoal residue. That is the theory anyway.

This is an extreme over-simplification of how the gasifier really works. Wood and other biomass is made of incredibly complex macro-molecules like Cellulose and Lignin that break down into hundreds or thousands of different smaller molecules as the reaction proceeds. There are thousands of different complex chemical reactions going on inside the reactor. The overall result though, if the gasifier is working well, is represented in the simple formulas above.


See: www.mdpub.com...



posted on Apr, 9 2012 @ 04:22 PM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

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