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Bugging out in Australia

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posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 07:23 AM
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I was thinking about the possibility of a shtf situation in Australia,
and having to go out into the wilderness and live off the land a for a while.
Sort of in the bear grylls style.

But then I wondered where would be the best place in Australia to do such a thing for a possible unlimited amount of time.
I mean we have so many different types of locations from rainforest to desert.
Where would you go?

It would need to be a very large wilderness area,
with a low possibility of bumping into other people,
lots of natural food growing and animals to trap
good source of water
relativity predictable weather, possibly not prone to natural disaster.

Would love to hear where you think would be the best place.
Thanks.




posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 07:29 AM
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reply to post by IgnorantSpecies
 


On a large ship, the flood is coming!!



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 07:30 AM
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reply to post by IgnorantSpecies
 


Go watch/read everything you can by Les Hiddens and Malcolm Douglas.

Get permission to enter Arnhem Land.

Live like the traditional aborigines.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 07:30 AM
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reply to post by IgnorantSpecies
 


Learn from the mistakes of Max and stay away from the great sandy desert...



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 07:37 AM
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Originally posted by Chadwickus
reply to post by IgnorantSpecies
 


Go watch/read everything you can by Les Hiddens and Malcolm Douglas.

Get permission to enter Arnhem Land.

Live like the traditional aborigines.

Yeah I have watched a lot of their stuff plus read a bit to.
I have been to Arnhem land but am talking more in the east to south part of oz.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 07:37 AM
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Originally posted by CrimsonMoon
reply to post by IgnorantSpecies
 


Learn from the mistakes of Max and stay away from the great sandy desert...
It wouldn't be my first choice



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 07:40 AM
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reply to post by IgnorantSpecies
 


How about the forests in Tasmania?

There are places there no man has even been yet, you could disappear in there forever if you were so inclined.

Plenty of food and water too.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 07:45 AM
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Ive got my choices of places to go. I like the highlands in Southern NSW/Northern VIC. Plenty of wild goats and pigs, plus native animals, lots of clean fresh water and lots of space. Lots of trout and in some streams/rivers there is Murray Crays........they make Lobsters look like prawns. Also, lots of resources and caves.

Some of Tassie would be nice also. I would stick to somewhere cool though because i hate the heat. Would be kind of fun to just go bush for a while, by choice.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 07:45 AM
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Anywhere along the great dividing range.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 09:07 AM
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Permits for Arnhem land don't exist anymore thanks to the current labour government in the nt.

The best bug out location is what your best suited to. I live on Darwin, so the costal tropics are my play ground.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 12:49 PM
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Originally posted by IgnorantSpecies
I was thinking about the possibility of a shtf situation in Australia,
and having to go out into the wilderness and live off the land a for a while.
Sort of in the bear grylls style.


Don't go into the desert. If you go into the rainforest in Queensland in particular as well, animals will be the least of your worries. We've had backpackers have extremely unpleasant things done to them, up there.


It would need to be a very large wilderness area,
with a low possibility of bumping into other people,


No idea where you'd find that. Western Australia, maybe. I think wanting to be somewhere completely alone is insane, personally. I went to a good place in northern NSW last year. Rainforest, lots of good country...and very nice, friendly people who were willing to help me out.
edit on 6-4-2012 by petrus4 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:14 PM
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I'm from tassie, I've lived in the bush, mountains etc.

Now in a SHTF scenario, tassie is "meh" considering you've gotta be able to get there, so unless your already in tassie it's not really feesible, point being: will travel services still be available, planes, ferry etc.
Now I know some mainlanders think there is a bridge to tassie but no there is not


Now consider this, your in tassie, great! You've found the bush, great! Once your 50 metres in, the leeches will start to attack, then the ticks, and the mozzies.

I've been in some seriously thick bush land where it's not uncommon to walk 1km and have 20+ leeches draining your life, take cradle mountain for instance, the gravel looks like its a moving 3D scene as the leeches cover the ground, they drop out of trees, and if you cross a river your gonna get owned hard by em.

Still keen?

Cool, so in the center of tas, you've got the great lakes, personally I prefer a place called bradys lake, or brushy lagoon, here you can catch trout in pods that have been flooded, or in the knee deep water simply by " tickling".
You've also got a large amount of rabbits, birds, and deer if you can land one.
Now as long as you've got warm clothing or a survival pack with the all the comforts, a couple of spare lighters, matches, butane burners would be good also, as there is always plenty of firewood to burn, my brother and I always went camping with simple stuff, a roll of alfoil, lighters, and a sleeping bag, make a BBQ plate out of a road sign covered in alfoil works great


I live in Qld now and don't get away much, but I'll always head bush if I know there's fresh water.

Also remember, in tassie the fresh water from the lakes is beautiful to drink as long as you filter out the fish poo, best to filter it and boil it, salmonella will ruin your first day otherwise, then your devil food.

Edit to add, tassie only has a population of 500,000. And there is never a great amount of people that go the lakes in droves as a lot of people don't like -5 to -10 temps so they prefer the creature comforts of home and a lot can't handle the environment, so id give tassie a 7/10 rating for a place where you won't run into people.
edit on 6/4/2012 by AlanQaida because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 01:05 AM
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99.9% of ppl will not survive 'bugging out' and living off the wilderness anywhere, especially not here in Australia. If you can't survive 4 weeks in the wilderness right now, then you probably dont have enough time to get it together at this point. Plus there's simply not enough animals left to support droves of ppl desperately hunting anything that moves. You are far better off getting your local community prepped & resililent, and you will best placed to survive teotawki. Time starts now...



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 02:10 AM
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the east coast ranges may be safe enough, though it could become impossibly crowded in a shtf situation, food and water would be an issue then.

central australia has the food but prone to extremes of climate change and isolation, staying away from all native entitlements would be a safer option also, especially the sacred sites or watering holes in such areas.

don't be fooled that you can go un-noticed without any land owner ever knowing your treading within their property even in the middle of nowhere, state owned forersts might be a better choice for this reguard.



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 02:24 AM
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Originally posted by Shar_Chi
99.9% of ppl will not survive 'bugging out' and living off the wilderness anywhere, especially not here in Australia. If you can't survive 4 weeks in the wilderness right now, then you probably dont have enough time to get it together at this point. Plus there's simply not enough animals left to support droves of ppl desperately hunting anything that moves. You are far better off getting your local community prepped & resililent, and you will best placed to survive teotawki. Time starts now...


I agree with this ^^^^ I used to run thoughts in my head where i would escape to, and to be honest. Unless my house was destroyed or similar, i would just stay home. Started a garden and food storage last week



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 03:54 AM
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Originally posted by IgnorantSpecies
It would need to be a very large wilderness area,
with a low possibility of bumping into other people,


If TSHTF, smart people will go to the good areas, so there will always be the possibility of coming across others in them.

The best way to avoid contact with them in dense bush is using your ears, not so much your eyes. Don't constantly keep moving. Take the time to stop and listen. If someone is not moving and you are, they are going to hear you first.

Be careful if on the move when it is windy. That is when you are likely to bump into others as you probably won't be able to hear them and they probably won't hear you.

There are heaps of places in Australia where you can go where you could easily remain undetected for the rest of your life. I'm not going to tell you where abouts I'll be, but I'm sure you will find a nice place of your own.



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 04:15 AM
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Originally posted by 8om8er
Ive got my choices of places to go. I like the highlands in Southern NSW/Northern VIC. Plenty of wild goats and pigs, plus native animals, lots of clean fresh water and lots of space. Lots of trout and in some streams/rivers there is Murray Crays........they make Lobsters look like prawns. Also, lots of resources and caves.

Some of Tassie would be nice also. I would stick to somewhere cool though because i hate the heat. Would be kind of fun to just go bush for a while, by choice.


You need more than just meat and fish, what about fruit and vegetables? just meat and fish will eventually kill you.
Plus what about clothing and footwear?



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 04:28 AM
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Without a doubt far north Queensland, Atherton Tablelands.



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 05:33 AM
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Originally posted by AlanQaida
Now consider this, your in tassie, great! You've found the bush, great! Once your 50 metres in, the leeches will start to attack, then the ticks, and the mozzies.

I've been in some seriously thick bush land where it's not uncommon to walk 1km and have 20+ leeches draining your life, take cradle mountain for instance, the gravel looks like its a moving 3D scene as the leeches cover the ground, they drop out of trees, and if you cross a river your gonna get owned hard by em.


Agreed. I suspect that most of the people who post in this subforum, enjoy making themselves appear hardcore, but the reality is somewhat different. Before you ask, no, I'm not either. I'm unfit, thoroughly domesticated, and lazy, and aside from a few basics, my real survival knowledge is minimal. Depending on the conditions and what I'd brought with me, I'd realistically give myself a week, tops; and that assumes a] I was able to keep the vermin off me, b] I was mostly eating from supplies I'd brought with me, rather than fishing or hunting, and c] I didn't get bitten by a brown snake.

When I went into northern NSW last year, I saw people get hit with leeches and ticks, although I never got any myself for some reason...must have just been lucky. One homeless guy I knew was pulling ticks and tick scabs off himself more or less continually, while we talked. Someone also showed me a brown snake that they'd killed and beheaded at the hostel where I was staying, as well.

Northern Australia is no joke, kids. As well as the leeches and ticks, you're looking at the most venomous animals on the planet. The King Brown and the Taipan are the two most dangerous snakes, and then you have the trapdoor/funnel web spider. If you go into the desert, you'll get scorpions. If you go north far enough, you'll get 9-12 foot long crocs. If you go to the beach, you'll get stingrays, box jellyfish, and white pointer sharks. If you're in the rainforest and don't know how to get water, you will end up with gastro from drinking it, which can kill you if it gets bad enough.

Tropical weather also means that you do NOT want to let any skin cuts or wounds go untreated. They get infected in the humidity, and you get blood poisoning and die, if you don't get them quickly enough. You would not want to go up there without adequate first aid, (both knowledge and supplies) or the ability to identify the most dangerous animals, at an absolute bare minimum. Some food grows up there in the trees as well, yes; but nowhere near as much as it used to. The environment is on the ropes, these days.

Don't think of yourselves as John Rambo and decide that you're going to disappear into the bush by yourself. It doesn't matter what you think of yourselves; 98% of the people who read this would probably die within the first two weeks, and again, I include myself in that.

I understand the desire to go to a place where there is less police attention, and more sustainability. I want that myself. However, I'm not going to a place where I will be completely alone, because I'm not a suicidal idiot who overestimates my abilities. I'm going to a place where there will be several people who've proven to me that I can trust them, and who trust me. We're going to grow food together, share what we've got, and rely on each other.

I've read before that even special forces people generally don't try and do things in teams of less than four. We unfortunately have been given a lot of images of the one man war in the movies, and they are completely unrealistic.

The reality is that post-TEOTWAWKI, you will need people, and they will need you. Most of the time, being alone eventually means being dead.



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 05:49 AM
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I'd take my chances with the temperate Adelaide Hills, plenty of room to grow food in the temperate environment, no dengue fever, malaria, ticks or leaches..... It's good fruit tree/vege growing areas, spring water/rainfall, firewood, hidey holes, old mines etc. I back onto a conservation park full of roos and koalas and my shed always seems to be full of prolifically breeding rats and mice. Anyone know any good recipes? Queue blackadder western front ratto-van and marinade rat jokes....... Need to breed lop eared rabbits, apparantly 1 buck and 5 does will keep you fed one rabbit meal a week.. Just don't mix up the originals or you may end up getting mutant inbred ones...



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