It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Reasons why I believe the sun is more luminous and why it matters to you

page: 14
90
<< 11  12  13    15  16  17 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:10 PM
link   
reply to post by shortsticks
 


I really think you are right and I am so glad others notice this! My husband and I were just discussing how many people do not even look up anymore and notice the changes! Even when I was a kid 10 years ago I remember looking at the sun and it was small. There is SO MUCH light now that it blinds me if I even look near the sun! Something has changed and they have not told us about it but I am certain they are aware. I also agree that it has to do with entering the cloud. We will only know for sure in December... I am excited to be right!




posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:37 PM
link   
reply to post by shortsticks
 


This is so ridiculous to me it's not even funny. You'd have to be half blind to be able to stare at the sun and see any individual colors. Everyone else has a to wear a wielder's mask or equivalent to be able to avoid being temporarily blinded by the sun or having retinal damage, but some member here swears to be able to notice small changes in luminosity!

Sad thing is that there will be people who fall for this and believe you. Not here, not now, not ever.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:39 PM
link   

Originally posted by Mayflower1987
We will only know for sure in December... I am excited to be right!


Are you referring to a cataclysmic event? End of the world type scenario?

If so, why would that be exciting? Is your life so #ty that you need something terrible to happen to the world just so you can be right once?

Go see a therapist.

[Insert facepalm meme here]
edit on 5-4-2012 by ColAngus because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:41 PM
link   
i too remember the sun being a yellow gold color and now it is so bright it is hard to drive west at times its like a damb spot light in the face maybe the sun is older than we think could it be our ozone getting thinner or is the sun becoming more intence with its age



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:42 PM
link   
reply to post by Swills
 


I guess my reply to you didn't make the cut here, shame that.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:44 PM
link   
So, people find it strange that your eyes become more light sensitive as you age? Just saying?



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:45 PM
link   
reply to post by paradox
 


well yeah that's my position, you're free to take it or leave it. If I provided nothing of substance I would think that all the smart people here wouldn't have generate an inking of interest in anything I've said thus far. There's hope still yet. And that is freaking awesome.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:47 PM
link   
reply to post by shortsticks
 


If January comes and nothing's happened, will we get a mea culpa?

Or just a revised timeframe? New username from you? Crickets?



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:47 PM
link   
post removed because the user has no concept of manners

Click here for more information.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:48 PM
link   
How does vision change with age?


Being able to see clearly when exposed to reflected light or bright sunlight - especially outdoors on a sunny day or in a hallway with highly polished floors - requires filtered lenses or other adaptations to control glare and to see the environment clearly


I think the common factor here is your eyes are aging normally and are more sensitive to glare and bright light sources.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:49 PM
link   
reply to post by njl51
 


you got it in my opinion, everything you said. 'can't you see the signs?'



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:51 PM
link   
reply to post by Swills
 


haha, okay, point taken.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:54 PM
link   
post removed because the user has no concept of manners

Click here for more information.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:56 PM
link   
Please reply to the topic. Additional post that are uncivil, focus on other members, or contribute nothing to the discussion will be removed. Please refer to the original post or the title of this thread for an indication on what should be discussed here.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:57 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by ColAngus

Originally posted by Mayflower1987
We will only know for sure in December... I am excited to be right!


Are you referring to a cataclysmic event? End of the world type scenario?

If so, why would that be exciting? Is your life so #ty that you need something terrible to happen to the world just so you can be right once?

Go see a therapist.

[Insert facepalm meme here]
edit on 5-4-2012 by ColAngus because: (no reason given)


Not at all I love my life! I for one believe it will not be cataclysmic... but life altering. I hope that it is a solar eruption that knocks out everything for many years. I am ready to survive such a scenario with my family. This will solve the problem of over population along with the overpowering fist of the US government, I believe we need to go back to how we lived 150 years ago..... and I believe it will happen this December
Also I am far to confident in myself to believe I need a therapist..... but if you pay I will gladly go and see what help they may offer.... just for fun



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:58 PM
link   
reply to post by Mayflower1987
 


preach it!

but then again everything is normal, I'm sure the extra woolly mammoths thought so too. there are signs leading up to the big event to be sure, but in the end, it will hit us all with almost no warning. this in fact is your warning. take it or leave it, I don't care. why is there so much effort to discredit what I've said. If it's loony then fine. I'm ready, All the rest is irrelevant. Not true, I know. I do care, that's why I hope to take everyone I can into eternity with me. Damn me and my morals.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 02:00 PM
link   
reply to post by daynight42
 


yet you admit freely the sun isn't able to be looked at for any length of time. I hear you.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 02:00 PM
link   

science.nasa.gov...

October 27, 2009: Every 11 years, the sun undergoes a furious upheaval. Dark sunspots burst forth from beneath the sun's surface. Explosions as powerful as a billion atomic bombs spark intense flares of high-energy radiation. Clouds of gas big enough to swallow planets break away from the sun and billow into space. It's a flamboyant display of stellar power.

So why can't we see any of it?

Almost none of the drama of Solar Maximum is visible to the human eye. Look at the sun in the noontime sky and—ho-hum—it's the same old bland ball of bright light.

"The problem is, human eyes are tuned to the wrong wavelength," explains Tom Woods, a solar physicist at the University of Colorado in Boulder. "If you want to get a good look at solar activity, you need to look in the EUV."

EUV is short for "extreme ultraviolet," a high-energy form of ultraviolet radiation with wavelengths between 1 and 120 nanometers. EUV photons are much more energetic and dangerous than the ordinary UV rays that cause sunburns. Fortunately for humans, Earth's atmosphere blocks solar EUV; otherwise a day at the beach could be fatal.

When the sun is active, intense solar EUV emissions can rise and fall by factors of thousands in just a matter of minutes. These surges heat Earth's upper atmosphere, puffing it up and increasing the drag on satellites. EUV photons also break apart atoms and molecules, creating a layer of ions in the upper atmosphere that can severely disturb radio signals.
To monitor these energetic photons, NASA is going to launch a sensor named "EVE," short for EUV Variability Experiment, onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory as early as this winter.

"EVE gives us the highest time resolution (10 sec) and the highest spectral resolution (< 0.1 nm) that we've ever had for measuring the sun, and we'll have it 24/7," says Woods, the lead scientist for EVE. "This is a huge improvement over past missions."



The Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) with its primary sensors labeled.

Although EVE is designed to study solar activity, its first order of business is to study solar inactivity. SDO is going to launch during the deepest solar minimum in almost 100 years. Sunspots, flares and CMEs are at low ebb. That's okay with Woods. He considers solar minimum just as interesting as solar maximum.

"Solar minimum is a quiet time when we can establish a baseline for evaluating long-term trends," he explains. "All stars are variable at some level, and the sun is no exception. We want to compare the sun's brightness now to its brightness during previous minima and ask ourselves, is the sun getting brighter or dimmer?"

Lately, the answer seems to be dimmer. Measurements by a variety of spacecraft indicate a 12-year lessening of the sun's "irradiance" by about 0.02% at visible wavelengths and 6% at EUV wavelengths. These results, which compare the solar minimum of 2008-09 to the previous minimum of 1996, are still very preliminary. EVE will improve confidence in the trend by pinning down the EUV spectrum with unprecedented accuracy.



Above: Space-age measurements of the total solar irradiance or "TSI". TSI is the sun's brightness summed across all the wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum--visible light and EUV included. TSI goes up and down with the 11 year solar cycle. Credit: C. Fröhlich.

The sun's intrinsic variability and its potential for future changes are not fully understood—hence the need for EVE. "The EUV portion of the sun's spectrum is what changes most during a solar cycle," says Woods, "and that is the part of the spectrum we will be observing."


Maybe we'll never know. It's hard to argue with the above evidence. I personally thought the sun seemed brighter but my older eyes could just be more sensative. There could also be less "noise" (unlikely) between it and I, just don't know.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 02:00 PM
link   
reply to post by shortsticks
 


it could be that as we get older it's harder to stare into the sun.

The only way to varify your claim is to have some children also stare at the sun for the same amount of time that you or some adults do.

Then compare how long each is able to stare at the sun.

If it's even, then you are probably onto something...not sure what that something is though.

If the children can stare longer then that also might mean it has something to do with age.....but even that is probably only part of it.



new topics

top topics



 
90
<< 11  12  13    15  16  17 >>

log in

join