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Reasons why I believe the sun is more luminous and why it matters to you

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posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:19 AM
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I do have to agree with you. I feel the intensity of the sun has been increasing for several years now. You can feel it when you go outside. I work construction and I can feel the difference. Also others I know have also comfirmed what I say because I ask them if the sun feel hotter...




posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by gaurdian2012
 

I'd be willing to bet it's the atmosphere and not the sun that has changed. not to take away from any concerns though



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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Originally posted by buckeye13
-Op, I am sorry, but luminous is not the correct term here.

A star's luminosity is determined by it's distance away from us and it's apparent brightness. What you mean to say is that it is becoming brighter, not more luminous. Brightness also has to do with temperature, the more bluish that the star looks the hotter, and conversely the more red a star, the cooler it is

But that does not make any sense either, because a star's lifetime has to do with the fuel it has for nuclear reactions. Stars only use 10% of their mass as energy in the form Hydrogen Fusion so to say that anything is being added to increase this reaction has no basis in the real world. Our sun, through it's lifetime, will only cool down (except on the core- temp will increase) and expand.

Furthermore, there are hundreds of scientists looking at the sun everyday and measuring it's apparent brighness, it's distance away from us (even though that is fairly stable) and it's luminosity. The change in color would cause a change in wavelength on the visible spectrum, which would have sounded an alarm bell somewhere as this technology is fairly common and is used by astronomy students worldwide.

Source: I am an astronomy major.


I'm glad you're an astronomy major and not English, because your usage of it's versus its is kind of glaring to me. But I'm willing to overlook that fact.

Unfortunately I can overlook your mountain of erroneous thinking. The sun is not a giant ball of nuclear reactions. Has anybody sustained a proposed nuclear fusion model from start to finish? Absolutely not. But this doesn't surprise me in the least. Conditioning starts at the earliest of ages, and you aren't the exception.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:27 AM
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Originally posted by bottleslingguy
reply to post by gaurdian2012
 

I'd be willing to bet it's the atmosphere and not the sun that has changed. not to take away from any concerns though


Well.... what changes the atmosphere then?

In my opinion.... it goes hand and hand. Either the atmosphere is changing with the root cause of this Energy cloud or it is being controlled by Science/Government experimentation.

After all.... this is where I say again... Dr. Michio Kaku believes "we will be in control" in less than a hundred years which makes me believe the experimentation is already underway.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:29 AM
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reply to post by Furbs
 


try this one instead

UV index land of oz



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by shortsticks
 


You clearly said more luminous.

You aren't seriously going to tell me that you are able to see UV radiation, are you?

The graph I linked to measures the correct set of numbers, numbers taken from a much larger sample at that.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by RocketMan0266
 


just dimensions. or dementia-ons lol

that is, it's not a big secret, we align in 2d every year, but this will be the first for our alignment in 3 D

yes, thanks goes out to you know who on that one



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by Suspiria
 


I already said countless times I'm in Korea. just do a google search of sun from wiki, and you'll see the two pictures I posted. I don't get what you're getting at. It's getting late here, so that could be it, not your post I'm sure.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by MamaJ
 


wow, I never considered that. thanks~!



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:35 AM
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No offense, but staring at the sun when you were a child, and staring at it now, is hardly the basis for any sort of scientific conclusion.

If there was a brighter sun (brighter than caused by normal changes), there would be other effects you could note. For example, plants do grow better under brighter lights. Thicker branches, darker leaves, more growth, etc. Has there been a great increase in plant growth in the last 20 or 30 years? If there was a great difference in brightness, the climate would change fairly significantly. That hasn't happened.

Could be other things you are noticing as well - we are closer to the sun at different times of the year, we don't have a perfect orbit for one. When we are closer, the sun seems brighter. Less pollutants in the air would yield a brighter looking sun. Sunspot cycles actually can cause the intensity to change. But it's fairly constant - it's been measured for centuries, and it has not changed much over that time.

You may well be seeing a "brighter" sun.. but I don't think you need to worry about it bursting into a huge nuclear ball or anything, any time soon. It's a natural thing,



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:35 AM
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reply to post by fnpmitchreturns
 


but didn't you know that our own experiences count for absolutely nothing in this game?



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:36 AM
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reply to post by bottleslingguy
 


like I said, I'm not proud of implanting this idea of a thinning atmosphere for more than two simple reasons



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:37 AM
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reply to post by Furbs
 


I'm not here to split hairs.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:38 AM
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What I do notice is that the sun is less yellowish now and became whiter and then the night sky is dark blue and not black as I used to know it.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:39 AM
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Originally posted by shortsticks
reply to post by Furbs
 


I'm not here to split hairs.


You aren't here to get answers either, it seems.

Your wildly ignorant supposition and baseless claims in the face of decades of hard evidence given by thousands of people around the world to the contrary; you MUST be correct because YOUR eyes tell you a different story.

Yeah, you keep playing in your sandbox, friend.
edit on 5-4-2012 by Furbs because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-4-2012 by Furbs because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:40 AM
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reply to post by fleabit
 


I think we have already seen extreme changes in our climate. I really don't know how you could possibly say otherwise. In any case, you should hold on to your hat, because summer hasn't even started yet, has it?



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by shortsticks
 


I never said that the nuclear fusion reaction would be sustained indefinitely; stars do not live forever. They run out of Hydrogen fuel at the core and start to expand.


Conditioning to what? All I said was based on scientific evidence, any google search will turn up thousands of articles about the sun, brightness, luminosity, parallax, spectrum classifications...

You are the one stating that something could be added to this reaction to increase the temperature, therefore the apparent brightness. Temperature needs to increase at some level in order for the visible spectrum to be changed, and I am pretty sure someone would notice (scientists...) if the sun was exponentially hotter as to cause mass die offs and catastrophe.

Again... I never said sustained nuclear fusion was a possibility- though stars, like ours (a yellow dwarf), last for tens of billions of years.

Pwned.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by wavemaker
 


I noticed that too about the night sky. I think that's why we can't see all the stars at night like we once used to. While not in direct light, the light from the sun still washes over everything. I miss that brilliant night sky. Only cameras now with long exposure times can give us the amazing pictures we used to be able to clearly see with our naked eyes, twenty years ago that is.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:42 AM
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I haven't gone through the thread yet but I thought I would point out that there is variation in the Sun's luminosity based on the solar cycle. Considering that we are going into a solar maximum it stands to reason that the Sun's luminosity has increased.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 11:44 AM
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Originally posted by Furbs

Originally posted by shortsticks
reply to post by Furbs
 


I'm not here to split hairs.


You aren't here to get answers either, it seems.

Your wildly ignorant supposition and baseless claims in the face of decades of hard evidence given by thousands of people around the world to the contrary; you MUST be correct because YOUR eyes tell you a different story.

Yeah, you keep playing in your sandbox, friend.
edit on 5-4-2012 by Furbs because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-4-2012 by Furbs because: (no reason given)


why not just be honest? I'm not your friend, and you certainly aren't mine. There's no hard evidence as you claim, otherwise you'd have already posted it. Fess up.




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