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Property owners, would you be ok with "affordable housing" in your neighborhood?

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posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 08:53 PM
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reply to post by boot2theface
 


Glad to share. We are on very opposite sides of this I would imagine from reading over the thread but I never really thought you were trying to attack anyone. Passionate towards your ideals, sure, but who isn't, right?

I feel very strongly for the poor as well, being poor myself. Most months I struggle to keep the minimum $100 in my checking to not get charged a fee.

My thoughts are if government would just get the hell out of my way I wouldn't be poor for very long. Others feel like the government is the only thing keeping them from living in a gutter or under the bridge.

I think it is because some people see the direct actions of government and it helps them whereas others see the indirect actions of government and how it hurts them. People can argue til they are blue in the face but it doesn't change much.




posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 09:09 PM
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reply to post by mayabong
 


I lived in a large once beautiful gated community that went section 8 due to the Florida rental situation.

See Grandma gets the section 8 and has 4 violent grandchildren because her daughter is a whore whos locked up or you just get the whore with 4 violent kids who eat sugary crap all day that makes them crazy and evil.

There was no positive male role models, all the older ones where grade A scum but smart enough to avoid the armed individual.

They destroyed it in about 8 months time, burglaries skyrocketed, there was garbage and filth everywhere and they enjoyed defecating in different common areas.

They killed a female duck by inserting a fire cracker in her rectum and lighting it, they set fire to the Gym and stole all the bikes in the complex, once about 15 of them tried to flash mob me at my doorstep, thankfully my Benelli was there and they knew it.

I have many more stories but I am sure you get the picture

I confronted these animals many times and they ranged in ages 10 to 18, I hate to say it but I hope Homeland Security tracks down and kills every last one of these damn homegrown terrorists.

Too bad Ron Paul supporters are the ones deemed dangerous.

I moved because I did not want to have an incident if I could help it
Where I live now, everyone of all colors and race own the homes and what a difference!

I dont hate the poor, I just hate scum.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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reply to post by mayabong
 


Sure! export the terror over a larger area!
Go live in a section 8 area, I am sure you wont like it for too long.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 09:54 PM
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reply to post by mayabong
 

I'm a little late to a long thread so forgive me replying straight to the OP and just the OP, but as a Homeowner I'm fine with this. I'm in a blue collar working neighborhood with single family post WW-II type homes and it's already got a large # of renters. Some are great and some..well..the local SWAT Team has had work on our street a couple times in the past few years.


If the affordable housing is administered properly and NOT "blindly" to any warm body, then people needing that are no worse than anyone else and..in some cases...far more motivated.

On the other hand..If that affordable housing were Section 8, I'd start looking at long term planning to sell and get the heck out as soon as the market recovers to where I'm not outright losing money. It's all in how a program is run, in my opinion.....the PEOPLE in it are as much a mix of good and bad as any other area of life.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 09:57 PM
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www.abovetopsecret.com...


Paradise or Oblivion (28 language subtitles)

The only real answer of course. And crimes are the nature of being in need. All those others would be living very much the same, if they were in terrible situations too, like most of the people on earth are and good chunk in our countries.

What I would do in this current world is have everyone have a home, all people have a income, above the poverty line, and payments for rent to own would be 1/3 income with utilities so its affordable.

And a fair and equal world.

Not our slave one.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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Originally posted by samhouston1886
reply to post by mayabong
 


Sure! export the terror over a larger area!
Go live in a section 8 area, I am sure you wont like it for too long.


Was that intended for me?



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 10:07 PM
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reply to post by mayabong
 


Yes, Section 8 residents are crime prone, I lived in a complex full of them for 18 months, why would you want to spread them around?

I know you will attack me for saying it but its true.

They should house them on old oil rigs, let them start trouble with the sharks.
I would accept section 8 only under the condition that any sort of crime committed by a resident or 3 crimes by their guests would be grounds for eviction.

If it was for 65 and older with no kids I am fine with it too, but I will be dammed if I am taxed to support the animals that destroy the area around me.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 10:09 PM
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reply to post by Unity_99
 


That might work for the Japanese but have you been to downtown Miami lately?

This would take an iron fist to implement and several generations to become a working model.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 10:12 PM
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reply to post by samhouston1886
 


No I'm not gonna attack you. I see what you are saying.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 10:20 PM
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We should merge county jail and section 8 housing. That way when they routinely get thrown in jail we just lock the front door. And if they don't like it they can leave at any time.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 10:25 PM
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reply to post by mayabong
 


You make a great point OP. Currently, I live in a very mixed neighborhood. We have less than 10% of section 8 housing. The neighborhood is transitional for sure.

However, it is quite apparent whom is living section 8 versus having ownership. The section homes look despicable.

Most of us home owners are waiting for real "home owners". They take much better care of their properties. Section 8 is such a blight to us that work hard to make the community look good.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 10:32 PM
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Property values are a serious subject and no one wants to see their long term investment ruined by a bunch of low rent trash moving In next door. That's what you get with rent assist or Section 8 units coming into a neighborhood.Those people don't own the property so they could care less what it looks like.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 10:56 PM
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Originally posted by samhouston1886
reply to post by Unity_99
 


That might work for the Japanese but have you been to downtown Miami lately?

This would take an iron fist to implement and several generations to become a working model.


There is no excuse for it not being here everywhere and every other system is completely illegal. I've always known that slavery is against the most basic of common law and we are all born with the intrinsic right to the earth/land/resources and no one can stop us from having our own homes and land and food growing.

So one thing you can't do when you make a list of priorities is violate the basics.

Everyone seems to have all these conditoins that they would like that if, their country didnt have so many problems, when its this violation that has created nearly all those problems. That is what living in massive inequality does and everyone who thinks they're all that would be living the same if it was them and there's.

People who don't know there is a solution can't be blamed for all the suffering and poverty, traumas and violence, crimes and year in prison some children grow up to endure, they don't realize that the wars, and greed and world wide poverty is due to our system and has always been, due to who is running this. But their compliance makes them partners to these horrendous crimes.

Many don't know but some do.

One thing you cant do is make up excuses as to why its OK. There is no reason for it to be OK, its the foundation upon which the world/society should be built.

Before there was a venus project, I still understood this principle. And that this is criminally insane.

Yes, its hard to bring crimes and poverty into your neighborhood, but then again, poverty needs to be eliminated, and equality all around us, for every child. And we need to be there for each other. Healing partners.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 10:58 PM
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Sounds like this is the first hint of Obama's next big plan in his conquest to start a class war.
First he wants to redistribute the wealth, next he will try to redistribute the real estate.
Maybe at some point he will want to redistribute student GPA's?



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 11:00 PM
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I wouldn't mind at all. I mean what righteous man or woman would be against a program that provides housing for those who are less fortunate and in need of assistance?



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 11:37 PM
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"Property Value" is completely imaginary. A property is worth the materials and labor used to create it. Now, if we're talking about commercial properties, then location can be the difference between failure and success.

Those most concerned with property value are those looking to profit from home sales and/or those who wish to use their equity for loans. Sorry,but I'd rather live in a world where everyone can have shelter, rather than one where people use shelter for profit. (Not counting hotels)

Home prices now, when compared to the devalued dollar are much more realistic than home prices pre-recession. The less money spent for shelter, the more can be used for everything else. That alone will help the economy more than any bailout, tax cut, refund, or other financial trick.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 12:27 AM
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The question I would have is who decides whats affordable housing and what is not?? I think that is the Central Issue not whether the person moving in would be acceptable. I have ran into many of people in my life and I can tell you there isn't much of a difference between a drug dealer and a business owner.
edit on 5-4-2012 by hoochymama because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:52 AM
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reply to post by DaTroof
 





"Property Value" is completely imaginary. A property is worth the materials and labor used to create it.


C'mon now... that obviously isn't true. How in the world can you think that? Property Value certainly isn't imaginary, though it can be subjective so perhaps imaginary in that sense of the word. Your context appears to not mean it that way though.

Property is worth what the buyer is willing to pay to the seller. The material and labor involved obviously has a role in the matter but they are just factors. Location is another factor. Hundreds of factors could exist in any given situation. The property value is the assessment of all factors that both add and decrease value to an individual. Each individual will value those factors differently.



Those most concerned with property value are those looking to profit from home sales and/or those who wish to use their equity for loans.


Profit motive, the great bogeyman huh... obviously property value is of concern to those purchasing as well, even if they never intend to make a profit. Why shouldn't people profit from selling their homes? You know, people use the equity to send their kids to school, support their parents in their old age and other great things for society, they are not just stacking coins and buying luxury items. Profit is capable of great things. Profit can turn a person born to poverty into the greatest philanthropist. Profit is what keeps families fed and children in school.



Sorry,but I'd rather live in a world where everyone can have shelter, rather than one where people use shelter for profit. (Not counting hotels)


Than I imagine you will be happy to hear, you do live in a world where everyone can have shelter, even those with no money have options, though they are not always very ideal, I admit. Heck, some places even pay you to live there. I suppose you mean a world where everyone has their dream house or a home that they find more than suitable.

I would like to live in that world too, the problem is that nobody can make everything they need, they have to rely on someone else to make things for them, the people that make things for them deserve something for their time and effort. Money was created to serve this purpose. For this world to exist we would have to find another way to compensate people for their time and effort. What is your suggestion?

Also, competition will always exist for the most sought after homes. In this utopia, how would people decide who lives where? Money has to be a factor. The only other way to do it would be to have a judge deciding who deserves to live where. You want a judge to tell you where you deserve to live? What if you did not agree with them? Wouldn't you rather decide for yourself? That is where money comes in or your new suggestion on how people should be compensated for their time and effort. No system of deciding can be perfect but then again life isn't perfect either and certainly cannot be.
.


Home prices now, when compared to the devalued dollar are much more realistic than home prices pre-recession.


Ah Ha! I knew we could agree on something!



The less money spent for shelter, the more can be used for everything else. That alone will help the economy more than any bailout, tax cut, refund, or other financial trick.


You are ignoring what a large portion of the workforce has been and would be employed by the housing market. The less money spent on homes, the less money people earn, the less they have to spend. Unfortunately, the money just doesn't transfer somewhere magically, it still has to be earned by work to be spent anywhere else. Property value has a large influence on what that work pays and how much of it is available.


edit on 5-4-2012 by sageofmonticello because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 02:04 AM
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I'm for more section 8 housing but I'm against them being in my neighborhood.

Why?
1) it lowers property value.

Look we can all argue if property value is real or not. But when there is a bunch of poor people living near to you, the selling price would decrease significantly.

2) people roaming around

Look I'm sure there's a bunch of nice people living section 8 housing but I've been around too many of them. When I was in college, I lived in a poorer apartment complex. Police came to the apartment once or twice per night. Why? I normally hear shouting, arguing, etc and sometime shooting. I rather not live near those people again.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 09:31 AM
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Originally posted by someguy0083
I'm for more section 8 housing but I'm against them being in my neighborhood.

Why?
1) it lowers property value.

Look we can all argue if property value is real or not. But when there is a bunch of poor people living near to you, the selling price would decrease significantly.

2) people roaming around

Look I'm sure there's a bunch of nice people living section 8 housing but I've been around too many of them. When I was in college, I lived in a poorer apartment complex. Police came to the apartment once or twice per night. Why? I normally hear shouting, arguing, etc and sometime shooting. I rather not live near those people again.


Don't you see any problems with that thinking? lol. If you don't want it in your neighborhood, why would you want to subject other people like you to the same thing somewhere else?



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