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'Faster than light' scientist steps down

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posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 11:48 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Precisely. And undermining one of the fundamental principles of the theory of Relativity would be catastrophic in today's political and economic climate.

Why? How are politics and the economy affected by relativity?

If the lead loses the support of his team he can't function. Stepping down would be the only recourse.

edit on 4/2/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 11:52 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by soficrow
 


Precisely. And undermining one of the fundamental principles of the theory of Relativity would be catastrophic in today's political and economic climate.

Why? How are politics and the economy affected by relativity?


It's all about perceived stability and social engineering - and whether or not people consider "authorities" to be reliable. Start changing the basic premises and assumptions and who knows where it might all lead? Protests, economic collapse, the list goes on.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 11:57 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Start changing the basic premises and assumptions and who knows where it might all lead? Protests, economic collapse, the list goes on.

Sure, the advancement of science has always led to protests and economic collapse. Hasn't it?

You expect Occupy Relativity demonstrations? "Save our slow neutrinos!"

edit on 4/2/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 11:59 AM
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The bartender says "We don't serve time travelling neutrinos in here"

A time travelling neutrino walks into a bar.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 12:11 PM
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Originally posted by soficrow
Precisely. And undermining one of the fundamental principles of the theory of Relativity would be catastrophic in today's political and economic climate.


...What?

Science is science irregardless of what Aunt Maybelline buys from JCPenney. As long as it's pink, I highly doubt she cares what the molecular structure of the dress is in the first place (she probably wouldn't even be able to tell you why it's pink!).



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 12:17 PM
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To those saying this smells like a cover up all I can say is that the reasoning behind your claim makes no sense. One of the hardest things to do as a scientist is to obtain funding. Do you really think the money would dry up if the laws of physics were found to be wrong? If anything money would start being handed out like candy as the whole world races to figure out how the universe actually works. Plus, this would give most scientists their best opportunity at becoming a household name and leaving a lasting mark on science as a whole. Then there's the fact that if FTL were found to be possible it would create entirely new industries and the jobs that go along with them giving a bump to the world economy. The claims of cover up and conspiracy just don't make any sense from a logical standpoint.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 12:31 PM
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reply to post by GLontra
 


I second the notion that this is a cover-up. Set up an interview to talk with this scientist. There is more going on behind the scenes. If this neutrino business is true, the ENTIRE world-wide fields of science and trillions of dollars worth of equipment and all of the textbooks would be scrapped. This is a national security issue. Real progress in science is not allowed. Period.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 12:39 PM
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Originally posted by GLontra
This is obviously a cover up.

The neutrinos were REALLY faster than light.







If you're so sure of this, then you should have no problem in quantifying the rest mass of a superluminal neutrino. No? Or at least give us the proof.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 01:03 PM
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Yes, this is definatly a coverup, as the original tests were repeated....

Several Hundred Times

Not to mention independently corroborated by at least 2 other facilities around the world.

The current "Elite Control" of Scientific knowledge absolutely relies on the public, and Physicists absolutely believing in relativity without question.

He was probably pushed out of his position through the clever usage of gang-stalking tactics introducing dissent into the work environment, as well as other external pressures.

It sounds like they just made his work environment a living [snip] to force him out.

And all the while, what was "Their" excuse as to WHY the neutrino's were seen as travelling faster than light?

a loose cable?

Bah... might as well have blamed it on El Nino.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by RSF77
 

I agree with you. Scientists are heroes in their own way. Mistakes shouldn't be so frowned on. In fact, there's an adage that those who make the most mistakes tend to be the most successful.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 01:07 PM
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I now can see why people are so afraid to go out on a limb with new theories. Getting them wrong is career suicide for some I guess. Also, this would also cause science to move much slower.

As far as detecting light speed neutrinos, the results could be due to the instruments and doesnt yet prove or disprove anything... yet.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 01:09 PM
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I think this article goes fully into the problems with both Einstein and the theory of relativity, including a few other whales of science that have been disproved by data. But alas, they prefer their pet theories.

www.levashov.info...



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 01:13 PM
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reply to post by GLontra
 

Your argument is baseless unless you can prove the repeat experiment(s) wrong. You're just stating a feeling right now. Science isn't based on feelings. The reality of science is happening in front of us.

I just think that if a guy makes a mistake it shouldn't be so destructive to his reputation. How do we learn more if we never make mistakes????? Maybe he made a very elementary mistake and they haven't told us.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 01:43 PM
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Originally posted by DJW001
To the Mods: Please move this thread to a more appropriate forum if necessary.


They will, they don't need your permission.

I absolutely agree with you that the need to publish is greater now than before. If they start to lose interest, then they start to lose money, and no group wants this. I'm surprised "major" announcements like this don't happen more often! Thanks for bringing this up.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 01:50 PM
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I have a love hate relationship with science these days. Like the idea of science, but hate the scientific community, if it can even be called a community. Too much ridicule and shunning goes on for my tastes, that stifles innovation. It seems to me that scientists are still mad about all the wedgies and swirlies they got in high school, and take it out on anyone they can, including each other, or something.

edit on Mon, 02 Apr 2012 13:51:23 -0500 by TKDRL because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by soficrow
 


Start changing the basic premises and assumptions and who knows where it might all lead? Protests, economic collapse, the list goes on.

Sure, the advancement of science has always led to protests and economic collapse. Hasn't it?

You expect Occupy Relativity demonstrations? "Save our slow neutrinos!"

edit on 4/2/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)


You've obviously haven't heard of the Copernican Revolution then? It was around the 16th century and started the scientific revolution.


Edit: forgot to add: VIVA LA REVOLUTION!
edit on 2-4-2012 by superman2012 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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I'm not a physics expert, but doesn't the big bang theory require things to move faster than light?

In my physics class in college we were told that when the big bang went off the mass moved at faster than light speeds.

So if it can happen once, doesn't that mean it is possible?



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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Originally posted by superman2012

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by soficrow
 


Start changing the basic premises and assumptions and who knows where it might all lead? Protests, economic collapse, the list goes on.

Sure, the advancement of science has always led to protests and economic collapse. Hasn't it?

You expect Occupy Relativity demonstrations? "Save our slow neutrinos!"

edit on 4/2/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)


You've obviously haven't heard of the Copernican Revolution then? It was around the 16th century and started the scientific revolution.


Edit: forgot to add: VIVA LA REVOLUTION!
edit on 2-4-2012 by superman2012 because: (no reason given)


Hi.

I am of the personal opinion that science it self is metered-out according to economics. We never see new toys until Christmas...



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 02:08 PM
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i bet 20 bucks he was pressured to step down.

If you do not prove impossibility then you must assume it is possible.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by DJW001
 
I read about that he was publicly humiliated he should have been more conclusive



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