It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Willease's lunar anomalies

page: 1
9
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 11:21 PM
link   
I have many lunar anomalies to show you, but rather than clog this forum with different threads for each anomaly,
I am only going to start two. This one for lunar anomalies and the other will be space shuttle and ISS anomalies.
I'll add to them as time goes on, but for now let's start with this one...


AS15-M-15661
wms.lroc.asu.edu...

zoom in on area as shown below...





posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 11:27 PM
link   
That is just Awesome looking, I couldn't begin to explain it, But it's Cool Looking Photo, The crater looks almost square.
Thanks



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 11:32 PM
link   
I like a good lunar anomaly as well as the next guy. But I do rather expect some--how shall we say--opinion or explanation or context.

Do you have a theory? I mean, it IS weird, I'll admit. But it might be something or it might be anything or it might be nothing....



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 11:50 PM
link   
reply to post by Ex_CT2
 


Oh it's something all right, but what I have no clue. If I knew it wouldn't be an anomaly and I wouldn't post it (or the hundreds more I have ready to post)!



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 11:55 PM
link   
Interesting. I have no idea where to even begin speculating. Are these your own personal pictures you've taken?



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 12:13 AM
link   
reply to post by Willease
 

finally you have brought them here (from there)...for viewing and consideration...

edit on 2-4-2012 by mastersmurfie because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 12:18 AM
link   

Originally posted by Willease
I have many lunar anomalies to show you, but rather than clog this forum with different threads for each anomaly,
I am only going to start two. This one for lunar anomalies and the other will be space shuttle and ISS anomalies.
I'll add to them as time goes on, but for now let's start with this one...

AS15-M-15661
wms.lroc.asu.edu...

zoom in on area as shown below...


When I start a thread about lunar anomalies I just don't post a photo, I state what I think the anomaly is and then have the members agree or disagree and give their opinions. This first anomaly doesn't spur me to post an opinion, it's just there and it could be something on the surface or it's not.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 12:22 AM
link   

Originally posted by LeaderofLostSouls
Interesting. I have no idea where to even begin speculating. Are these your own personal pictures you've taken?


C'mon, man, that's an Apollo photo! Do you have any idea of the kind of equipment necessary to take that kind of a photo? Actually, from above the surface only!



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 12:30 AM
link   
reply to post by The Shrike
 

It's not uncommon for amateur astronomers to have photo equipment hooked up to their telescopes.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 12:41 AM
link   
reply to post by mastersmurfie
 


It was people on this forum that brought a conclusion to the LCROSS anomaly so I realized this is a good place to seek answers. It was the logical thing to do.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 01:24 AM
link   
When viewing images from the Apollo Lunar Mapping Cameras (such as the one in the OP) you should be aware of this:

Subsequent analysis during image reprocessing revealed that foreign debris was present in the optical path of the camera system, and can be seen in the photographic exposures. Selected examples of blemish features of this type are shown in Figure 2. A movie showing blemish movement can be seen here. While the image processing steps undertaken as part of this effort may have removed some of these blemish features, users should be aware that blemish features exist in many of the images.

apollo.sese.asu.edu...

The key to identifying these blemishes is that in viewing various images in the same sequence the "anomaly" will appear in the same location in each frame. For example:

From these images:
apollo.sese.asu.edu...
apollo.sese.asu.edu...
apollo.sese.asu.edu...
apollo.sese.asu.edu...


These "anomalies" have appeared frequently on ATS.
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 01:42 AM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Perhaps the anomalies you posted have been discussed before. But the one I posted I haven't been able to find here at ATS. How about a link to that.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 01:49 AM
link   

Originally posted by LeaderofLostSouls
reply to post by The Shrike
 

It's not uncommon for amateur astronomers to have photo equipment hooked up to their telescopes.


Just like I used to. But no earthbound telescope can see the moon as shown in the photo. And it doesn't matter how good a camera or CCD attachment is connected. You can't beat being above the earth's atmosphere.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 02:23 AM
link   
reply to post by Willease
 

Download the "Large PNG" of AS15-M-1566 (you have the wrong ID but the correct link in the OP) and you will find your "anomaly" at pixel location 10193, 5540 (with no rotation).

Download the "Large PNG" of AS15-M-1569 and and what do you find at pixel location 10193, 5540? Here it is, rotated to match the rotation in the OP.


Interesting. No?
You will find the same thing occurs with all of the "anomalies" from the mapping camera images. This is because they are debris in the optical path of the camera and not objects on the surface of the Moon.

Your "anomaly" is nothing special. Its ilk have been discussed repeatedly.

edit on 4/2/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 02:49 AM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Willease
 

Download the "Large PNG" of AS15-M-1566 (you have the wrong ID but the correct link in the OP) and you will find your "anomaly" at pixel location 10193, 5540 (with no rotation).

Download the "Large PNG" of AS15-M-1569 and you will find the same "anomaly" at pixel location 10193, 5540. Here it is, rotated.


Interesting. No?
You will find the same thing occurs with all of the "anomalies" from the mapping camera images. This is because they are debris in the optical path of the camera and not objects on the surface of the Moon.

Your "anomaly" is nothing special. Its ilk have been discussed repeatedly.


edit on 4/2/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)


I'm convinced, nice job. That is the reason I came to this thread, because people like you do what you do.
I looked at the photo before and after but couldn't find the anomaly...
wms.lroc.asu.edu...
and
wms.lroc.asu.edu...

That will be the first and last metric image, the rest are from the Hasselblad camera images.
Thanks again.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 03:45 AM
link   
This anomaly does not show up anywhere in the pictures before or after, meaning the answer to the first anomaly won't explain this...


AS16-120-19273
spaceflight.nasa.gov...

The same picture obviously doctored to remove the anomaly...


archive.org...



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 10:52 AM
link   
Your last images looks like dead skin cells with a hair to my eyes.

Graphic coordinates of that shot from Apollo 16 is 7.6 deg N, 119.7 deg E. I'm not seeing it on the LROC shots. Nor on the Google Moon.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 11:34 AM
link   
reply to post by Willease
 

An obvious example of debris on the film and caught by the scanner.
You can see the fibers.
edit on 4/2/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 11:57 AM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by Willease
 

An obvious example of debris on the film and caught by the scanner.
You can see the fibers.
edit on 4/2/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)

Says you. Prove it. Is that going to be your answer to everything I post? It may be "debris on the film"...or whoever processed the image originally had a cold and we are looking at snot...who knows for sure?
Obviously somebody noticed because the second image was clearly doctored.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 11:59 AM
link   
reply to post by Willease
 

Or perhaps it was a different scan with a better job of cleaning the film.
But yes, if these are your examples of "anomalies" I expect to see more of the same.


Getting a little touchy?
edit on 4/2/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
9
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join