It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Are 1970s' cult/religious brainwashing techniquies still practised?

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 05:30 PM
link   
There is little doubt that the idealism, and bad drug experiences of the 1960s left a disillusioned young Western people in the 1970s.

Frequently it seems that they could be programmed by cults within a few days.

Cults could alter behavior based on young people's desire to do something good.

Although there were many means of mind-control, the best are shown in a film, which includes:

- Removal from the family for a camp, or holiday
- loading the language and love bombing - depersonalization
- sleep deprivation
- a diet of inadequate food, especially protein
- repetitive behavior, such as singing, chanting or the repetition of key phrases
- a variation of passive listening to preachers, contrasted with over-enthusiastic, child-like activity
- gender segregation, and women who are flirtatious, but always out of reach (which is probably why they don't like homosexuals)

Anyway, I've become very interested in how "mainstream Christianity" mind-controls men in SA (Angus Buchan's "Mighty Men" conferences), or even how a new cult called Desteni is being spread.

Most of these techniques can be seen in the 1981 film Ticket to Heaven.
This depicts a young man with some personal problems being brainwashed by the Unification Church (the Moonies) within the first 30 minutes of the film.


I think most religions have noticed that this is too hardcore, and one can make more money from financial or psychological dependance, rather than keeping physical slaves.

Nevertheless, have you ever been in a situation with religion where you felt depersonalized, and somehow controlled?

I'd also love to collect all movie scenes about religious mind control for future reference.


edit on 1-4-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 05:46 PM
link   
These are some of the techniques that were used on me as part of my Gang Stalking. So yes from personal experience I can say that they are still used.

This book details what you are describing. It is a standardized account of how the system of brainwashing works. Brainwashing using the methods described in this book is common place in today's society if you are unlucky enough to be selected as a target/victim.

www.scribd.com...



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 05:53 PM
link   
Well the US government did use these techniques on a large scale hence why the people obediently follow the government



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 05:55 PM
link   
reply to post by halfoldman
 


All religions are cults.
All use brainwashing techniques weather they be full on or subtle; both have the same effect in the long run.
All take advantage of people and steal their money.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 06:00 PM
link   
The next time you see a room full of people watching tv you should go outside and observe them through the window.

Try it!!

Because your disconected from it the control the tv has over the viewers becomes very obvious, and it uses much the same methods as you describe.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 06:16 PM
link   
reply to post by VoidHawk
 


I may just try that for a laugh....their faces and eyeballs would all move in sync



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 06:54 PM
link   
If you're interested in this sort of thing there is a great book which I cam across in a used bookstore, it's called "Snapping" and deals with cult conversion tactics, how they affect members and some of the struggles related to deprogramming. It's a good read.


Snapping: America's Epidemic of Sudden Personality Change is a 1978 anti-cult book which describes the authors' theory of religious conversion, called snapping in terms of mind control, is a mental process through which, the authors argue, a person is recruited by a cult or other religious movements.


Snapping WIki Entry

Thanks for the vid link, I'll have to watch that when I have a chance.
edit on 1-4-2012 by Shadowflux because: fixed link



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 07:24 PM
link   
Another movie on the topic from 1980 is Blinded by the Light.


Made for TV, with lower ratings than the groundbreaking Ticket to Heaven, the cult here is fictional, and somewhat emblematic.

Much of the film ends up being a heavy debate between the father and daughter on the morals and merits of kidnapping and deprogramming the younger sibling.

Nevertheless, I could live in that cult - it could be worse.
It never existed, but if it did I'm sure it would still be around.
edit on 1-4-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 07:48 PM
link   
reply to post by halfoldman
 



Are 1970s' cult/religious brainwashing techniquies still practised?


Oh absolutely, there is "nothing new under the Sun" as the old saying goes. When people are freed from the cults they usually say they feel as the "chains have been lifted". One of the world's leading expert on cults, false religions, and New Age garbage is Dr. Ron Carlson, his insights are a tremendous blessing in regards to this very subject.




edit on 1-4-2012 by NOTurTypical because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 07:52 PM
link   

Originally posted by Shadowflux
If you're interested in this sort of thing there is a great book which I cam across in a used bookstore, it's called "Snapping" and deals with cult conversion tactics, how they affect members and some of the struggles related to deprogramming. It's a good read.


Snapping: America's Epidemic of Sudden Personality Change is a 1978 anti-cult book which describes the authors' theory of religious conversion, called snapping in terms of mind control, is a mental process through which, the authors argue, a person is recruited by a cult or other religious movements.


Snapping WIki Entry

Thanks for the vid link, I'll have to watch that when I have a chance.


Another great book is titled "Another Gospel, Cults, Alternative Religions, and the New Age Movement" by Ruth A. Tucker.

www.amazon.com...



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 07:58 PM
link   
Only in the Marines.....Just kidding.No .no,no it didn't work it's too crude.Now they have NLP and electro-magnetic resonance conditioning.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 08:12 PM
link   
reply to post by NOTurTypical
 

That's very interesting, because a lot of people nowadays feel that they can label something a "cult" simply because it's another faith or culture, or something with which they disagree.

However, as I found out with Krishna consciousness for example, cult educators like Rick Ross have no problem with people believing in Krishna, they have a problem with the structure in certain groups.

Although it's a silent epidemic or hidden problem mostly, I think people have lost their fear of cults, or what a real cult actually entails.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 08:20 PM
link   
reply to post by halfoldman
 


Well not all things are cults. A cult would be a false offshoot of a genuine thing, usually under the direct influence of a dynamic leader. Think Jim Jones. What shocked the lead person in charge of cleaning up Jamestown was there wasn't a single Bible found in the entire camp, not one. Jim Jones had brainwashed the cult members so effectively that they thought he was Jesus Christ.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 09:24 PM
link   
Doctor Phil - up to 5000 active cults in the US:




posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 09:39 PM
link   
I think that, on the surface, a cult is relatively hard to define because of the subject that we're dealing with. Almost all religions operate on the faith of their followers so there is no real standard by which to judge the truth of any particular religion. I do, however, feel that cults can be distinguished from non-destructive (by which I mean not destructive to the individual) religions by a few things. The most clearly evident differentiation is how much a cult will demand from its followers.

Cults are often all encompassing, particularly in the first stages of a member's involvement. Cults will demand all of the member's time, attention and, very often, their money. This is another aspect that helps identify a cult. Most cults are created for one of three reasons.

The leader is either:
1.Interested in financial gain
2.Interested in power (such as power over women for sexual purposes)
3.Mentally disturbed (cults can often serve to validate a leader's delusions)

Cults have changed a lot since the 1970s because the culture has changed. The 1960s and 1970s were a time when many people were seeking some sort of spiritual fulfillment, enlightenment or understanding. Cults often recruited members by playing into this desire. Society has changed, however, and cults have needed to change their recruitment techniques as a result.

Most people are much more aware of the existence and dangers of cults than they were 40 or 50 years ago. Things such as the internet and the proliferation of communications technology and media have made it harder for cults to recruit and isolate potential members in a public way. Most cults of today will operate in a subtler and more subversive manner. They will often hide behind some sort of professional facade, will masquerade as a new age organization or will combine both and offer themselves as "Self Help" organizations. This is, of course, only a few different masks that cults will wear.

The internet has offered cults an arguably easier and more intimate way to recruit new members. People are still searching for a way to fill certain inherent needs such as love, acceptance and guidance. The internet has allowed cults to wear a couple of different disguises and come into people's homes. Many modern cults will use things such as websites, blogs, podcasts and e-courses where they would have once used seminars, parties and other techniques that required physical interaction. This has proven to be more effective, in certain cases, because people are less likely to face criticism from family and friends.

Many people believe that one has to be quite gullible to be taken in by a cult but studies have shown the opposite to be true. Intelligent people are more likely to become cult members than less intelligent people. Part of this is due to the way cults "brainwash" people. Intelligent people are more likely to question society, religion and themselves. Cult "brainwashing" will often begin by placing recruits into a state of cognitive dissonance where they are questioning their preconceived notions. The problem arises when the cult becomes the only source of further information and answers. This leads to an inability for the recruit to think in a clear and logical manner, they will simply begin to believe what is being fed to them.

Enticement is, and always has been, another important aspect of cult recruitment. This will come in many forms and can be as subtle as encouragement and a feeling of acceptance or as blatant as sex, drugs or money.

Cults are a very interesting phenomenon and their ability to cause intelligent and rational people to give up their possessions, beliefs and lives can be even more interesting. I have experienced many classic "brainwashing" techniques myself and their effectiveness is both unpredictable and always rather astounding. I was never a member of a cult, per se, and was never "brainwashed" but not for their lack of trying. I have, however, seen many of these techniques be quite effective against a range of people from differing backgrounds. I have, since then, been very interested in their recruitment and "brainwashing" techniques and while I have gained a better understanding of the cult phenomenon I still can not say, with surety, what the complete answer is. I would even venture so far as to say there is no ultimate answer for why cults are as effective as they are because each recruit is so different.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 10:17 PM
link   
Can anyone give an objective and specific definition for "cult" and "brainwashing" ? Can you define cult in such a way that it wouldn't apply to every group with a leader?



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 11:07 PM
link   
reply to post by DavidWillts
 


I'll try. To me a cult is where the grand pubar, or person "preaching or relating" a message becomes the message themselves. While there are many types of what can be called "corporate culture", or political and societal ones that are in effect tied together by a strong personality, the Steve Jobs of the world are a force of nature, but in their respective field, skill or business. They are hardly viewed in anyway as super natural. A non-sensical term to me anyway since its just the natural, we don't understand yet. Delusions of god-hood come in many forms, and often arrogance is associated with a certain type of successful person.

But even the biggest prick knows to stay on top the most rational way is to listen to other peoples opinion. You don't have to follow any advice you don't want to if you have the power and control to do in the end what you want and how you want it. But no successful person is habitually insecure, meaning they don't want to hear other peoples ideas, my god! someone may have a better idea then me! Thats suicide for a company or country.

For a "church" its an embarrassment or should be. The main difference with a cult is the idolatry of the grand pubar, they are the reason not just the organization, religion, political movement exists, but why YOU exist! Its your "calling", you were destined to serve, them of course, starting with their ego. And there are many non-religious movements (EST in the 1970's comes to mind) a pop psychology movement more pop then psychology had more in common with China's cultural revolution of the 60's and 70's. You would be sent to "re-education camps" were one was effectively given points for pointing out all ones faults.

Were most "self help"concepts involve a rational and healthy look at ones strengths and issues, an organization that only tears down, and never supports is more like a dysfunctional family, the operative word family. A main cult attribute replaces your past family and friends with "them". It won't take long for that to be a focus in some ones disillusioned, and gullible mind. Cults recruit because like good intelligence operatives they see a "need"in a mark that (Its a miracle!) only they can satisfy. Its usually a lot more subtle in intelligence recruiting, but many of the methodology and constructed realities is very much the same.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 11:40 PM
link   
reply to post by DavidWillts
 


Differentiating between cults and other groups can often be rather difficult. There are, however, a few common and outstanding features which seem to separate that which would be termed "a cult" and that which is simply a group. Innocent or apparently harmless groups will often form in a natural way as a collection of people sharing a similar interest, ideology or goal. Focusing on groups with designated leaders will further decrease the spectrum of organizations which we are comparing by eliminating things such as book clubs, fan clubs and groups of friends.

While it can be said that most groups, especially those formed to promote and achieve a shared goal, will need a leader, cults are quite different upon closer examination. Cults will generally exist for one of three reasons, as I stated above.

Cults are created for:
1.Financial Gain.
2.Power.
3.The justification of mental or emotional disturbance.

In essence, a cult exists for the benefit of the leader to the detriment of the members and most often centers around the aggrandizement of the leader, often to a deified state where in he or she is worshiped in some form.

This creates a differentiation between cults and groups in that most groups are working towards the betterment of their constituent members. Groups will often follow ideas, morals or ideology but will hold these to be above the leader where as cults will place the leader above the ideology. A group may be formed, for instance, to help create better working conditions for factory workers and their goal is a better work environment for the members that make up the group. A cult, on the other hand, will only be focused on the gain of the leader and will, at best, neglect its members and, at worse, end their lives.

The difference between cults and groups is not to be found in their organizational structure but in both their true goals and the outcome of involvement for the members and the effect of affiliation on them.

"Brainwashing" is more difficult to both explain and accurately define. It can, however, be differentiated from ideological change in that it focuses, almost entirely, on information provided by the group without exterior contradiction or debate whereas ideological change is most often arrived at by an examination of available information and a subsequent critical analysis of it.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 05:32 AM
link   

Originally posted by DavidWillts
Can anyone give an objective and specific definition for "cult" and "brainwashing" ? Can you define cult in such a way that it wouldn't apply to every group with a leader?


Basically where the cultists are terrified to leave the cult, and the cult leader has effectively supplanted himself and his doctrine for the "truth". Or himself as the only authority, often as the second advent of Christ or another religious leader.



posted on Apr, 11 2012 @ 02:43 PM
link   
I'm too young to remember the '70's, but I believe the "church" a girl i know is a member of to be a cult. They twist bible scripture and take it out of context to make people believe that Jesus came back, in secret, as a Korean man named Ahn Sahng Hong. And that his "spiritual wife" Zang Gil Jah is the holy mother Jerusalem. They require 10% of members earnings through tithes and additional money is given through free will offerings. It seems they're encouraged to go out and recruit people, mostly college aged women. I'm told a lot of service men are members as well, but their membership is about 70% female.

Like I said, I wasn't around back in the day, but I'm pretty sure cults are alive and well in this country and around the world.

Check out these websites for more info on these people. Their theology seems to stem from Seventh Day Adventist teachings, but I've seen people compare them to the Moonies as well.

Encountering AhnSahngHong
Examining The WMSCOG
WMSCOG



new topics

top topics



 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join