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Can an object approaching the South Pole be hidden from prying eyes

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posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 10:41 PM
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Originally posted by OGOldGreg
Simple, there are inhabited lands not so far from the north pole. But no one lives within 10,000+ miles of the south pole. If you do make the journey to antarctica, i doubt you would think about looking at the sky with a telescope there. So a somewhat plausible theory from a certain standpoint
edit on 4-4-2012 by OGOldGreg because: (no reason given)

What are the coordinates or coordinate range in the sky that can only be seen from Antarctica?




posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 02:57 PM
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Originally posted by OGOldGreg
Simple, there are inhabited lands not so far from the north pole. But no one lives within 10,000+ miles of the south pole. If you do make the journey to antarctica, i doubt you would think about looking at the sky with a telescope there. So a somewhat plausible theory from a certain standpoint
edit on 4-4-2012 by OGOldGreg because: (no reason given)


Rubbish - I live in the north of New Zealand, and in a direct line the South Pole is 3180 miles away.
Learn some geography before hitting the keyboard.
South America, Australia and South Africa are also closer than 10000 miles.
And hey, last night on a clear and unpolluted evening, there was nothing to see in the direction of the celestial south pole (elevated about 37 degrees above the horizon), just a dark bit of sky, no red planet, no alien spaceship, no nothing.
edit on 5-4-2012 by Sailor Sam because: spelling



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 04:05 PM
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Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by OGOldGreg
 



Simple, there are inhabited lands not so far from the north pole. But no one lives within 10,000+ miles of the south pole. If you do make the journey to antarctica, i doubt you would think about looking at the sky with a telescope there. So a somewhat plausible theory from a certain standpoint


You've got your distances off a bit. It is only 12,000 miles from the equator to the South Pole. Bolivia, Argentia, and Chile are all within 10K of the South Pole as is most of the southern part of Africa and Australia and lots of other places.

If you travel to Antarctica you probably travel there in summer which means that the Sun never sets so you don't want to bring an astronomical tool.

Take a look earlier in the thread where I posted a picture showing how anyone in the southern hemisphere can peer int he direction of the South celestial pole.


I will admit that was an estimated guess without looking at a map. But you get where I was going with it. Regardless it doesn't negate my theory.

I mean think of it this way, can you see the sun going down in los angeles from a telescope in nyc?
if you can than I guess i'm just dumb.
edit on 5-4-2012 by OGOldGreg because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by OGOldGreg

Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by OGOldGreg
 



Simple, there are inhabited lands not so far from the north pole. But no one lives within 10,000+ miles of the south pole. If you do make the journey to antarctica, i doubt you would think about looking at the sky with a telescope there. So a somewhat plausible theory from a certain standpoint


You've got your distances off a bit. It is only 12,000 miles from the equator to the South Pole. Bolivia, Argentia, and Chile are all within 10K of the South Pole as is most of the southern part of Africa and Australia and lots of other places.

If you travel to Antarctica you probably travel there in summer which means that the Sun never sets so you don't want to bring an astronomical tool.

Take a look earlier in the thread where I posted a picture showing how anyone in the southern hemisphere can peer int he direction of the South celestial pole.


I will admit that was an estimated guess without looking at a map. But you get where I was going with it. Regardless it doesn't negate my theory.

I mean think of it this way, can you see the sun going down in los angeles from a telescope in nyc?
if you can than I guess i'm just dumb.
edit on 5-4-2012 by OGOldGreg because: (no reason given)

Exactly what does that have to do with anything? Oh right, nothing. You're talking about a difference in longitude affecting rise, set, and transit times. That has nothing at all to do with the fact that the entire southern celestial sphere can be seen from anywhere in the southern hemisphere. There are many, many amateur astronomers and telescopes in the southern hemisphere. Think about this, actually think for two seconds, do you need to be at the north pole to see the north star? No, of course not. Likewise, do you need to be in antarctica to see the south celestial pole? No, of course not.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 04:31 PM
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Yes I like all your points. I also like how you made all them without even directly answering my questions. I don't know why you're getting so mad either.
edit on 5-4-2012 by OGOldGreg because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 08:46 PM
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Originally posted by OGOldGreg
Yes I like all your points. I also like how you made all them without even directly answering my questions. I don't know why you're getting so mad either.
edit on 5-4-2012 by OGOldGreg because: (no reason given)

Your question is irrelevant for the reasons I already pointed out. There's nothing unique about Antarctica in longitude, nor is there some part of the sky that can only be seen from Antarctica rather than the rest of the southern hemisphere.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 08:49 PM
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Okay then prove it to me. Show me something othe than what you say is fact. I want proof. Not saying your wrong but your points have no sources.



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 09:40 PM
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Originally posted by OGOldGreg
Okay then prove it to me. Show me something othe than what you say is fact. I want proof. Not saying your wrong but your points have no sources.

It's self-explanatory to anyone who understands anything about geography and astronomy. I'm just telling you how it is, I've been doing this for 16 years now. Can you see the north star? Do you live on the north pole? No? Then why do you think you can't see the south celestial pole from anywhere in the southern hemisphere? You want me to take a picture of the south celestial pole from Australia? That can be arranged.



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 06:56 AM
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I've already posted this picture showing why people are so mistaken on this issue. That is the reason for thread in the first place. I wanted people to understand this issue. So many hoaxers make the false claim that there are parts of the sky only visible from the South Pole.




posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by stereologist
 


Yeah good picture, If it was close to earth you would no longer be able to see it but if it was farther away we would be able to see it. I guess it would be a Good place to park a cloaked mother ship when it's waiting in line to be refueled



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 11:02 AM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


That's right. Climb a tree to see farther away. Climb a mountain for a great view. Then again a tall mountain can be seen farther away then a small mountain.

Any planet approaching can be seen from half the Earth at any given time. A rotating Earth allows more area to view in some directions, but half the Earth can always see a particular direction.



posted on Apr, 10 2012 @ 01:23 AM
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reply to post by Bixxi3
 


Sure they can't, gotta stop at some point..





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