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Taureg's Descend Upon Timbuktu in bid to Recapture their Inheritance...

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posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 01:26 PM
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Originally posted by michaelbrux
reply to post by Biliverdin
 


Moussa is a popular name for coup leaders. Surely the Malian Moussa remembers well what happened with Moussa Dadis Camara after he seized power in Guinea and decided to make himself President.

Another article released today mentioned that the Malian military has reinstated the country's Constitution.





So now the questions that beg to be answered is who stand to benefit from the confusion? Is this another means of literally ceasing the nomadic existence of the Tuareg forcing them to abandon their ancient ways so it would be easier to control them?




posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 01:34 PM
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Originally posted by michaelbrux
reply to post by Chai_An
 


are you suggesting that the Taureg are prostituting themselves for yellow cake uranium wealth...

and that the idea they seek to be reconciled with their destiny is bunk?

does anyone on earth fight for REAL things?


No what I'm saying often when conflicts arise there's usually a hidden source who stand to gain from all the distraction and killing. Just look at Nigeria, Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia. European nations and yes even China are benefiting from the confusion in African nations. Yes people do fight for what they call justified reasons but many times they're being manipulated by supposed friendly nations who have their own agenda.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 01:41 PM
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Originally posted by Chai_An

Originally posted by michaelbrux
reply to post by Biliverdin
 


Moussa is a popular name for coup leaders. Surely the Malian Moussa remembers well what happened with Moussa Dadis Camara after he seized power in Guinea and decided to make himself President.

Another article released today mentioned that the Malian military has reinstated the country's Constitution.





So now the questions that beg to be answered is who stand to benefit from the confusion? Is this another means of literally ceasing the nomadic existence of the Tuareg forcing them to abandon their ancient ways so it would be easier to control them?


the article suggested they, the Taureg, are the descendants of the people that founded Timbuktu; as in there would be no such thing as Timbuktu without them. which would also mean that their ancestors lost control of the city to another group at some point in time and ended up in the desert. good thing they knew about being nomads.

just because they've been in the desert doesn't necessarily mean they desire it as a situation forever.

many people probably think native Americans enjoyed living in teepees out in the Western Plains...but natives used to live in cities and villages themselves...I remember reading something from Cherokee history from the 1830s that recounts the night they were expelled from their homes and forced to march to the wilderness.

my early posts weren't very descriptive concerning what I think is happening, not only in Mali, but everywhere.

but this is what I think:

people lost things...they want them back. not just in Mali, but everywhere.

those things aren't necessarily money or wealth..but things that aren't easily replaced.

and it seems people are coming for them. Timbuktu is just a symbol.

for those not holding tightly on to things that don't belong to them...there probably is no issue...but whoa to those that refuse to unhand what is not theirs.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 01:49 PM
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Originally posted by michaelbrux

Originally posted by Chai_An

Originally posted by michaelbrux
reply to post by Biliverdin
 


Moussa is a popular name for coup leaders. Surely the Malian Moussa remembers well what happened with Moussa Dadis Camara after he seized power in Guinea and decided to make himself President.

Another article released today mentioned that the Malian military has reinstated the country's Constitution.





So now the questions that beg to be answered is who stand to benefit from the confusion? Is this another means of literally ceasing the nomadic existence of the Tuareg forcing them to abandon their ancient ways so it would be easier to control them?


the article suggested they, the Taureg, are the descendants of the people that founded Timbuktu; as in there would be no such thing as Timbuktu without them. which would also mean that their ancestors lost control of the city to another group at some point in time and ended up in the desert. good thing they knew about being nomads.

just because they've been in the desert doesn't necessarily mean they desire it as a situation forever.

many people probably think native Americans enjoyed living in teepees out in the Western Plains...but natives used to live in cities and villages themselves...I remember reading something from Cherokee history from the 1830s that recounts the night they were expelled from their homes and forced to march to the wilderness.

my early posts weren't very descriptive concerning what I think is happening, not only in Mali, but everywhere.

but this is what I think:

people lost things...they want them back. not just in Mali, but everywhere.

those things aren't necessarily money or wealth..but things that aren't easily replaced.

and it seems people are coming for them. Timbuktu is just a symbol.

for those not holding tightly on to things that don't belong to them...there probably is no issue...but whoa to those that refuse to unhand what is not theirs.










I gotcha and yes I understand taking back what was your from the beginning, but be assured there's international meddling in the background.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 01:50 PM
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Originally posted by Chai_An

Originally posted by michaelbrux
reply to post by Chai_An
 


are you suggesting that the Taureg are prostituting themselves for yellow cake uranium wealth...

and that the idea they seek to be reconciled with their destiny is bunk?

does anyone on earth fight for REAL things?


No what I'm saying often when conflicts arise there's usually a hidden source who stand to gain from all the distraction and killing. Just look at Nigeria, Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia. European nations and yes even China are benefiting from the confusion in African nations. Yes people do fight for what they call justified reasons but many times they're being manipulated by supposed friendly nations who have their own agenda.


there is a great deal of confusion...but the confused own their confusion, the calm own their calmness and time reveals which are which.

and people who are sitting around thinking they will gain by manipulating others are delusional.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by michaelbrux
 





but this is what I think: people lost things...they want them back. not just in Mali, but everywhere. those things aren't necessarily money or wealth..but things that aren't easily replaced. and it seems people are coming for them. Timbuktu is just a symbol. for those not holding tightly on to things that don't belong to them...there probably is no issue...but whoa to those that refuse to unhand what is not theirs.


Wow,

Really good to know how you really feel about this.

I guess it will just never end until the last bit of vengeance and ignorance is squeezed from the world.

Have a good Sunday.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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Originally posted by Xoanon
reply to post by michaelbrux
 





but this is what I think: people lost things...they want them back. not just in Mali, but everywhere. those things aren't necessarily money or wealth..but things that aren't easily replaced. and it seems people are coming for them. Timbuktu is just a symbol. for those not holding tightly on to things that don't belong to them...there probably is no issue...but whoa to those that refuse to unhand what is not theirs.


Wow,

Really good to know how you really feel about this.

I guess it will just never end until the last bit of vengeance and ignorance is squeezed from the world.

Have a good Sunday.



you think the Taureg are getting vengeance by doing what they are doing?

i see at as the inevitable consequence of being.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 02:00 PM
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Originally posted by michaelbrux

Originally posted by Xoanon
reply to post by michaelbrux
 





but this is what I think: people lost things...they want them back. not just in Mali, but everywhere. those things aren't necessarily money or wealth..but things that aren't easily replaced. and it seems people are coming for them. Timbuktu is just a symbol. for those not holding tightly on to things that don't belong to them...there probably is no issue...but whoa to those that refuse to unhand what is not theirs.


Wow,

Really good to know how you really feel about this.

I guess it will just never end until the last bit of vengeance and ignorance is squeezed from the world.

Have a good Sunday.



you think the Taureg are getting vengeance by doing what they are doing?

i see at as the inevitable consequence of being.



i remember a certain story from one thousand nights and a night...can't remember which one...and don't feel like thumbing through it.

it involved a person who sought to avoid his own destiny...which he found undesirable.

...long story short...it didn't work.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by michaelbrux
 


Alright MB,

If you are going to play with folklore, I'm game.

But you are going to have to catch me up on what you mean there, how is that relevant?

Thanks,

X.

P.S. In reference to the reply below: I see, MB, thanks for elaborating, but I see that I was clear on your thoughts in the first place. Thanks for trying. Have a nice day.
edit on 1-4-2012 by Xoanon because: ok.


I feel compelled to share this song with you today, MB. I hope that you feel loved by those that love you today MB, these are troubled times. May we break bread one day, brother.




edit on 1-4-2012 by Xoanon because:


edit on 1-4-2012 by Xoanon because: better version of video



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by Xoanon
 


people lose things...perhaps in a manner which they feel were unfair...

the story of a city, such as Timbuktu, which i'm told was founded 900 years ago by a people that are currently living in the desert as nomads on the outskirts of the city that is currently under control of a different group.

in time, these people reappear at the city with heavy artillery and sweep aside all resistance and claim the city for themselves...

i'm not making a comment concerning if they are right or wrong...only that this is what destiny looks like.

how is it different from Jews praying at the Western Wall or the battles that took place between Thailand and Cambodia over a Temple they both claim as their own?

or for matter...how is it different from Republicans wanting to 'take back' the White House?

only time and place...no other difference.

its a human story which I found interesting...i wasn't trying to support the idea of revenge...but only to say...people will never escape or avoid their destiny...

it seems to be the order of the day.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by Xoanon
 


if you were clear..you would have been clear from the my second post.

its the order of the day.

i'm sorry you are someone that may be holding onto something that is not yours.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 02:30 PM
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reply to post by michaelbrux
 





i'm sorry you are someone that may be holding onto something that is not yours.


You can search my pockets, Brother.

See my post above.

All love to you and yours.

Xoanon.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 02:36 PM
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reply to post by Xoanon
 


i don't search pockets...

besides...what you are holding onto is stored in your own mind.

can i search it?



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 03:11 PM
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i was just thinking...

..i made a connection between Timbuktu and Taureg cultural ambitions with Jews praying at the Western Wall.

are some of you worried about that day when you are reading a thread on this forum with the following headline:

Judah Descends upon the Temple Mount...formert management Swept Away in Rage of Pain.

seriously...you'll probably be reading that thread before Labor Day...maybe before the Fourth of July.

I thought people would find it interesting that the Tauregs have had enough of the desert and have decided to go ahead and find a permanent home.
edit on 1-4-2012 by michaelbrux because: additions



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by michaelbrux
i was just thinking...

..i made a connection between Timbuktu and Taureg cultural ambitions with Jews praying at the Western Wall.

are some of you worried about that day when you are reading a thread on this forum with the following headline:

Judah Descends upon the Temple Mount...formert management Swept Away in Rage of Pain.

seriously...you'll probably be reading that thread before Labor Day...maybe before the Fourth of July.

I thought people would find it interesting that the Tauregs have had enough of the desert and have decided to go ahead and find a permanent home.


By the same thought process, can we expect your support when the descendants of the Piscataway descend on Washington to take back what is theirs?

I see where you are coming from, but all that I have read, is that up until now, the Tuareg have been fighting to preserve their way of life and to maintain the benefits that they glean from controlling trade, both legal and illegal over the Sahara transit routes. Do you honestly think that they have all of a sudden decided to throw in the towel and get a nice little des res in the town? Come on, surely you cannot be that naive.


edit on 1-4-2012 by Biliverdin because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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This, that Xoanon posted in the music thread earlier got me looking...



-Timbuktu is home to a library of ancient, camel-skin bound manuscripts covering science, astrology, medicine, history, theology, grammar and geography.

news.yahoo.com...




www.abovetopsecret.com...

And I found this rather interesting documentary...



It seems that in recent years a lot of money, both from South Africa and Europe, has been flowing into Timbuktu in order to preserve the literature and the history of the city. There have also been significant attempts, as detailed, to buy from the Tuaregs, their collections of books...as the documentary details. And they seem resisted to do so.

I am not really of the mind that this is about books, but it could be a cultural disagreement, a conflict over who gets to control the history of Timbuktu...or it could be that with this investment in the culture and heritage of Timbuktu that it has suddenly become worth owning...tourism is a profitable business after all.

Just a thought...
edit on 1-4-2012 by Biliverdin because: fix vid

edit on 1-4-2012 by Biliverdin because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 03:54 PM
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Every where that courier pidgeon Bono goes there is trouble.Just look at the creeps he rubs shoulder's with as he spread's his peace and good will.Note this for the future,there is alway's an upheavel with in three months of one of his visit's.
So you know who's delivering the instructions and funds.All circumstancial of course

Bono
Upheavel
Uranium



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 04:03 PM
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Originally posted by Biliverdin

Originally posted by michaelbrux
i was just thinking...

..i made a connection between Timbuktu and Taureg cultural ambitions with Jews praying at the Western Wall.

are some of you worried about that day when you are reading a thread on this forum with the following headline:

Judah Descends upon the Temple Mount...formert management Swept Away in Rage of Pain.

seriously...you'll probably be reading that thread before Labor Day...maybe before the Fourth of July.

I thought people would find it interesting that the Tauregs have had enough of the desert and have decided to go ahead and find a permanent home.


By the same thought process, can we expect your support when the descendants of the Piscataway descend on Washington to take back what is theirs?

I see where you are coming from, but all that I have read, is that up until now, the Tuareg have been fighting to preserve their way of life and to maintain the benefits that they glean from controlling trade, both legal and illegal over the Sahara transit routes. Do you honestly think that they have all of a sudden decided to throw in the towel and get a nice little des res in the town? Come on, surely you cannot be that naive.


edit on 1-4-2012 by Biliverdin because: (no reason given)


i assume that the Taureg ideals are beyond anything I could hope to write in this forum...i'd have to live with them for many years before I could understand.

as far as the Piscataway or the Taureg or any other people in this world...i wouldn't want to be in possession of something that belongs to them and I'd be sure to give it all back without delay and in the end I'd be happy that I was given the opportunity to do so.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 04:11 PM
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Originally posted by Biliverdin
reply to post by Chai_An
 


I like your avatar, very thread appropriate.


en.wikipedia.org...

Herodotus is an excellent source for the early history of these peoples and describes the North African tribes as being polygamists...but in the women's favour. Women were very highly favoured and would wear anklets for each of their loves to demonstrate their success. Fascinating people and history.


Thank you not many people know who she is, so refreshing when someone does. Yeah, women are treated so different amongst them. For instance a woman can conduct family business without a man as well as choose her own husband, can even take a lover if she so felt and yet they're muslim, fascinating people indeed.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by michaelbrux
 


The history, possessive, is not that simple...


Unlike Gao, Timbuktu is not mentioned by the early Arab geographers such as al-Bakri and al-Idrisi.[9] The first mention is by the Moroccan traveler Ibn Battuta who visited both Timbuktu and Kabara in 1353 when returning from a stay in the capital of the Mali Empire.[10] Timbuktu was still relatively unimportant and Battuta quickly moved on to Gao. At the time both Timbuktu and Gao formed part of the Mali Empire. A century and a half later, in around 1510, Leo Africanus visited Timbuktu. He gave a description of the town in his Descrittione dell'Africa which was published in 1550.[11] The original Italian was translated into a number of other languages and the book became widely known in Europe.[12]

The earliest surviving local documents are the 17th century chronicles, al-Sadi's Tarikh al-Sudan and Ibn al-Mukhtar's Tarikh al-fattash. These provide information on the town at the time of the Songhay Empire and the invasion by Moroccan forces in 1591. The authors do not, in general, acknowledge their sources[13] but the accounts are likely to be based on oral tradition and on earlier written records that have not survived. Al-Sadi and Ibn al-Mukhtar were members of the scholarly class and their chronicles reflect the interests of this group.[14] The chronicles provide biographies of the imams and judges but contain relatively little information on the social and economic history of the town.[15] The Tarikh al-fattash ends in around 1600 while the Tarikh al-Sudan continues to 1655. Information after this date is provided by the Tadhkirat al-Nisyan (A Reminder to the Obvious),[16][17] an anonymous biographical dictionary of the Moroccan rulers of Timbuktu written in around 1750. It does not contain the detail provided by the earlier Tarikh al-Sudan. A short chronicle written by Mawlay al-Qasim gives details of the pashalik in the second half of the 18th century.[18] For the 19th century there are numerous local sources but the information is very fragmented.[19]


en.wikipedia.org...

The Tuaregs have no greater right to possession, ancestoral or otherwise, than the current occupiers. And really, isn't it about time we all learnt to share?

I support the Tuareg if what they seek is representation, but the heritage is one of multiple cultures, and should be preserved as such.



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