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Dress Code Unreasonable?

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posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 09:50 AM
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I found this on Yahoo this morning. It's an article describing the crack-down on dress code at proms, and the war with fashion.

Prom Dress Codes


The Wall Street Journal reports that high schools across the country are tightening their rules about what constitutes overly provocative prom clothing in response to more and more girls pushing the envelope with micro-minis, cut outs, and plunging necklines such as the ones seen in our slideshow.

Trend watchers attribute the upsurge in revealing gowns to television shows such as "Dancing with the Stars" and Hollywood stars' sexy red carpet looks.

"It seems kind of petty," Cindi Lee, an Algebra teacher at Southmore High School outside Oklahoma City, told the Journal, "but we really do want them to understand we are holding them to a high standard." Administrators at the school have put together a twelve-page power-point presentation with close-cropped images to show students exactly what the rules are. "Words don't mean much to them," says Lee. Other schools are using posters and illustrated handouts.

Typical prom dress fails include gowns that are shorter than three inches above the knee, have low backs, are sheer, or have thigh-bearing slits.


I find it highly interesting, because in a day where 16 year olds are being paid to have kids on tv shows, and where kids are getting married and swiftly divorced fresh out of high school, we are still intent on forcing them to act like the cute little kids we want to be proud of for being younger versions of ourselves.

Basically, we want them to be us.

Now, the reason I say this is because while mothers and fathers will go out and wear whatever they like to the bar, children are being forced to act completely like zombified little puppies, dressing exactly as the government wants them to, and acting exactly as the government wants them to. We all know girls and boys are going to do whatever they want (alcohol, drug use, etc.) so why not allow them to do it in a controlled environment?

I have seen, on countless occasions, children going out and getting wasted or stoned or crazy on whatever influences/ideas they have in their vigorous youth, and it is always because they had no experience, or parents to guide them. When I say guide, I mean giving advice and stepping in only when physical or fiscal harm is imminent. Children must be taught at an early age what being an adult is like, because they are being forced to become adults at a young age.

Sure, they are going to have fun...but part of guiding them and teaching them is showing them the meaning of balancing that fun with the troubles of an adult life. THis means risky dress and risky behavior...because as we all know, to be human is to follow your impulse, take risks, and learn what to do and what not to do in certain situations.

Personally, I find this "dress code" issue a little overboard, because as adults, we do not always set the perfect example. In fact, I find that we very rarely set a great example. But the point of that is to show that even when we are most imperfect, there are ways to handle life like an adult. But perfectionism and absolute propriety are not the way.

Slits on the thigh, short skirt, jeans and tennis shoes are perfectly fine with me. Boys will be boys, and girls will most definitely be girls...if only to make a point and rebel.
Therefore, it is a losing battle to fight the growing up process. And that is exactly what these schools are doing. They are restraining and restricting young adults trying to come into their own (albeit experimentally) and the best they can do is help guide them and point them down the right road. Kids never reacted well to authority figures, and these measures will only bring out the worst of it.

They need to be friendly, understanding, and accommodating...to a certain point. There will obviously be times when the foot must come down, but I really don't think this issue is at that point.

Raising kids = teaching and showing how to live responsibly and productively, balanced with encouragement to be your own person and take necessary or harmless risks. Life is not without risk, so why fight it?

Training kids = creating factory-produced images of your younger self as you would have wanted it to be. In other words, your idea of a perfect kid. There's no such thing as perfect, and your child has a mind of his/her own, so where do you get off on this?

In short, we're helping them to grow up healthy and (somewhat) responsible, not become perfect. It's a losing battle if that's where you're going, so learn to live with the fact that your kid is going to experiment and make mistakes. You made plenty yourself (I know I have) so why are you trying to fight it? Are you afraid for them?

Life, as I said, is not without risk. They're trying to grow up, and these schools' efforts to curb and contain process are only going to bring out the worst...and inevitably harm their attempts to be productive. If you try to make a lion into a vegetarian, it will starve and eventually attack you. There's training, and then there's unnatural conditioning. Perhaps that's an exaggeration, but I hope I'm making my point.

What's your opinion on this?
edit on CFridayam333351f51America/Chicago30 by Starchild23 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 09:55 AM
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reply to post by Starchild23
 



HEY TEACHERS!!! LEAVE US KIDS ALONE!



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 09:56 AM
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I would suggest that although i understand your sentiment, possibly your reaction is slightly over the top?

As a Brit, School Proms are certainly not an area of speciality (didn't have them when i was at school). However, they appear to be a formal dance occasion. As such, i honestly do not see an issue with a dress code that sets high standards.

If they want something with no dress code, do not throw a Prom at the end of year, have a school disco / dance instead and they will be able to wear pretty much what they like.

Obviously though, with a limited knowledge of such things, i may have this totally wrong.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 10:04 AM
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Originally posted by Flavian
I would suggest that although i understand your sentiment, possibly your reaction is slightly over the top?

As a Brit, School Proms are certainly not an area of speciality (didn't have them when i was at school). However, they appear to be a formal dance occasion. As such, i honestly do not see an issue with a dress code that sets high standards.

If they want something with no dress code, do not throw a Prom at the end of year, have a school disco / dance instead and they will be able to wear pretty much what they like.

Obviously though, with a limited knowledge of such things, i may have this totally wrong.


My reaction is perfectly calm.
I am simply stating my arguments for the case.

Your reasoning is exactly my point. It's a prom, they are going to have dates...in the "adult" world (for which they are being taught) it is common to wear sexy clothing.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 10:06 AM
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reply to post by Starchild23
 


You have a point,but 16 year old looking like she's headed for a job interview at a strip club sets the limit.And that's what the school probably was going for.Of course there are parents who don't mind their daughter going to the prom with the boobs stuffed to her chin and butt hanging out,that's when schools need to intervene.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 10:08 AM
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reply to post by Starchild23
 


But a Prom is a formal occasion. Therefore a dress code is appropriate.

A dance / disco is an informal occasion and therefore no dress code is appropriate.

A change of wording and problem solved!
At the end of the day, how many times will they go to a prom in their adult lives? I would wager never (or at most could be counted on the fingers of one hand).



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 10:10 AM
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And adults also follow dress codes,and rules and that's what kids need to learn.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 10:11 AM
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Originally posted by adnachiel21
And adults also follow dress codes,and rules and that's what kids need to learn.


I wear sneakers to work.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 10:14 AM
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reply to post by Starchild23
 


What kind of job do you have?Does it require for you to wear a suit?
There is no conspiracy in this,the school requires for children to look respectable,not slutty that is all there is.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 10:14 AM
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Originally posted by Flavian
reply to post by Starchild23
 


But a Prom is a formal occasion. Therefore a dress code is appropriate.

A dance / disco is an informal occasion and therefore no dress code is appropriate.

A change of wording and problem solved!
At the end of the day, how many times will they go to a prom in their adult lives? I would wager never (or at most could be counted on the fingers of one hand).


Really? What makes a dance informal and a prom formal?

Personally, this is for the kids...by the kids...with the kids. Why should the kids have no choice in what to wear? As a child, my class mates and I raised the money for prom. We came up with the ideas. We put up the decorations, and we put the time and energy into the event. We have a student council making the entire thing happen.

And our dress code is entirely out of our hands? This is a miniature tyranny, in my opinion. It's the people, not the government. They get paid for educating us...without us, there would be no money. There would be no school. There would be no future.

We should have a say, but we do not. And that was year ago...it still happens today. ....oh, and I'm completely calm, by the way. Just slightly indignant. Tru fax.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by Starchild23
 


According to the dictionary:

prom
noun
a formal dance, especially one held by a high school or college class at the end of an academic year.

Not really sure myself, like i said it isn't an area of expertise for me! The thought of a formal dance brings me out in hives!



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 10:35 AM
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Originally posted by Starchild23

Originally posted by Flavian
I would suggest that although i understand your sentiment, possibly your reaction is slightly over the top?

As a Brit, School Proms are certainly not an area of speciality (didn't have them when i was at school). However, they appear to be a formal dance occasion. As such, i honestly do not see an issue with a dress code that sets high standards.

If they want something with no dress code, do not throw a Prom at the end of year, have a school disco / dance instead and they will be able to wear pretty much what they like.

Obviously though, with a limited knowledge of such things, i may have this totally wrong.


My reaction is perfectly calm.
I am simply stating my arguments for the case.

Your reasoning is exactly my point. It's a prom, they are going to have dates...in the "adult" world (for which they are being taught) it is common to wear sexy clothing.


Maybe on dates to the club, not dates to formal events. Formal events are for formal attire, in any world. It sounds like you missed the lesson on following and respecting the rules of conduct for an event that other people have taken the time to set up nice to ensure everyone can have a accross the board good evening. It really sounds like your problem is conforming to rules that you don't agree with. How about this: You just let those nice folks who set this up for the "kids" have the prom and only "kids" that follow the rules will attend. Then you can take your sexy dressed arse to "da club" while all the kids who recognize what the word "formal" means can enjoy the prom under the prom guidelines.
Peace......



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by Turkenstein

Originally posted by Starchild23

Originally posted by Flavian
I would suggest that although i understand your sentiment, possibly your reaction is slightly over the top?

As a Brit, School Proms are certainly not an area of speciality (didn't have them when i was at school). However, they appear to be a formal dance occasion. As such, i honestly do not see an issue with a dress code that sets high standards.

If they want something with no dress code, do not throw a Prom at the end of year, have a school disco / dance instead and they will be able to wear pretty much what they like.

Obviously though, with a limited knowledge of such things, i may have this totally wrong.


My reaction is perfectly calm.
I am simply stating my arguments for the case.

Your reasoning is exactly my point. It's a prom, they are going to have dates...in the "adult" world (for which they are being taught) it is common to wear sexy clothing.


Maybe on dates to the club, not dates to formal events. Formal events are for formal attire, in any world. It sounds like you missed the lesson on following and respecting the rules of conduct for an event that other people have taken the time to set up nice to ensure everyone can have a accross the board good evening. It really sounds like your problem is conforming to rules that you don't agree with. How about this: You just let those nice folks who set this up for the "kids" have the prom and only "kids" that follow the rules will attend. Then you can take your sexy dressed arse to "da club" while all the kids who recognize what the word "formal" means can enjoy the prom under the prom guidelines.
Peace......


Have you ever been to a business meeting? The only people not showing their curves are the people who have none. As for men...well, it's kind of hard to display a torso you don't have, right?

Oh, those kids. Well, see...they are what we call "anal retentive". They wouldn't know a wild night if it smacked their "arse" (as you so delicately put it) and sauntered off with their drink in hand.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 10:59 AM
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What is and is not "formal" is subjective to the person in question. I wore black vinyl to the prom years ago, I daresay many people would have thought it wasn't "formal".



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 11:01 AM
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Originally posted by antonia
What is and is not "formal" is subjective to the person in question. I wore black vinyl to the prom years ago, I daresay many people would have thought it wasn't "formal".


Speaking of subjective, it is now considered "improper" to wear a confederate flag to prom in the southern states.

It's no longer a matter of formal, so much as "Wear what we want you to wear". And that is entirely my point here.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 11:03 AM
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Originally posted by Starchild23

Originally posted by adnachiel21
And adults also follow dress codes,and rules and that's what kids need to learn.


I wear sneakers to work.


So. What does that have to do with going to the Prom. I am an engineer and I wear sneakers to work. what is your point?



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 11:18 AM
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I say as long as there is no nipples or vagina meat showing it is fair game.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 12:16 PM
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Originally posted by Turkenstein

Originally posted by Starchild23

Originally posted by adnachiel21
And adults also follow dress codes,and rules and that's what kids need to learn.


I wear sneakers to work.


So. What does that have to do with going to the Prom. I am an engineer and I wear sneakers to work. what is your point?


Work environments also involve dress codes. I pay no attention to the dress code, because my clothes do not affect how well I perform. I can wear overalls and a flight helmet in the office and I can still perform adequately.

Dress code is simply a symptom of mind control.



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