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Skye cave find western Europe's 'earliest string instrument'

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posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 03:48 PM
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Skye cave find western Europe's 'earliest string instrument'
(BBC.com)

A cave in Skye has turned up what may be Western Europe's oldest string instrument;




Archaeologists believe they have uncovered the remains of the earliest stringed instrument to be found so far in western Europe.


The article goes into more depth on the role of Skye as an important cultural center back then and that this cave was likely used for musical 'transformations';


"Within the cave, sound forms a major component of this transformation, the noise of the underground stream in particular producing a calming environment."




posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 03:51 PM
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flag and star
where does it plug in?



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 03:56 PM
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Originally posted by Danbones
where does it plug in?

Where that hole is. The strings go across the top, and then you apparently strike it with a dead squirrel to make the music. Then your mom tells you to turn it down.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 03:58 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


cant wait for the dubstep remix of that!



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by Blackmarketeer
The article goes into more depth on the role of Skye as an important cultural center back then and that this cave was likely used for musical 'transformations';


"Within the cave, sound forms a major component of this transformation, the noise of the underground stream in particular producing a calming environment."


I suppose the stream too would provide the inspiration for string instruments, and a wish to replicate the sound for portability.

Amazing find.

edit on 29-3-2012 by Biliverdin because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:18 PM
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Good find Blackmarketeer but I cannot resist....

Just to add a few more famous and older lyre's

The Sumerian Lyre from Ur






posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 



Given the picture further down the page that you link to, following the looting of the Bagdad museum...the OPs may now be the oldest surviving one though...and it is still the oldest found in Western Europe and better at showing the evolution of music technology.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by Biliverdin
 


At least one is safe

Silver lyre at the British Museum



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


Phew...that's a relief. Yes we British are far more careful when we do our looting and then keep it very secure so that the favour is never returned.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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could they give us a worse selection of pictures

nice angel, OWWWWW, can't make anything out with that picture, and with that picture alone i say its not a string instrument, i can't tell if the object is curved enough because of this AWESOME VIEW, in my opinion, you couldn't even make noise using strings on this object (LOOKS LIKE A ROCK) because the strings dont have enough free roam space, looks like they would be touching the rock 99% of the string, slaping a string AGAINST a rock doesn't really follow under string instruments for me at least, the best thing they could of used to is probably hair, horses hair, they didn't just whip out some nylon strings.


if anything thats not even 20% of the instrument, its just a broken off piece

but the real truth, they have no idea what its for, that could be for cleaning my ass after i take a nice #, lttle grip with the whole, and use those teeth to dig out all the crap

edit on 29-3-2012 by WanderingThe3rd because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 06:08 PM
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the one in the OP is apparently a bridge ( and a floating one at that ) which Huns Lyres don't have..
the little hole was prolly to tie the bridge to the instrument so it wouldn't get lost...in a cave

it really looks like a horizontal instrument bridge or a banjo type bridge..a real step up from a dead end tie off

oh here is an angelo saxon fancy a44sed ( metal bridge and peg )one from the 7th Century AD
www.britishmuseum.org...
not yur simplest construction

the ded squirell would be the easy part...

edit on 29-3-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-3-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 08:24 PM
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Speaking of Sumerian lyres, Ensemble De Organographia has performed music on traditional ancient instruments based on discovered notated music;



This is where an ancient culture really comes alive, when it can preserve and pass down it's music.
edit on 29-3-2012 by Blackmarketeer because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 10:19 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Sounds distressing like a Japanese koto - which I dislike intensely! Right along with chicken liver sushi and tomato surprise
edit on 29/3/12 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 

Older but not Western European, I guess.

By the way, that looks to me like the bridge of a lute-like instrument, with notches over which the strings pass. The round hole is a bit of a puzzle but their may be there for some valid acoustic reason.



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 09:40 AM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


i hope there will be working recreations i want one sooooo bad



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