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Neonicotinoid pesticides tied to crashing bee populations

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posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 03:40 PM
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Neonicotinoid pesticides tied to crashing bee populations


usnews.msnbc.msn.c om

A widely used farm pesticide first introduced in the 1990s has caused significant changes to bee colonies and removing it could be the key factor in restoring nature's army of pollinators, according to two studies released Thursday.

The scientists behind the studies in Europe called for regulators to consider banning the class of chemicals known as neonicotinoid insecticides. In the U.S., the Environmental Protection Agency told msnbc.com that the studies would be incorporated into a review...
(visit the link for the full news article)



Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Thread Index: Disappearing Bees
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NEW Bat Fungus Geomysis destructans OUTBREAK 7 Million Dead in 16 States, Countdown to Extinction!




posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 03:40 PM
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Bees have been disappearing - as in facing extinction - along with lions and tigers and bears and frogs...

Could it be the chemicals we dump on our food? In the air? The water?

Do ya think?

Or maybe it's the meds we don't assimilate and just pee out into the sewage that runs into the rivers and groundwater and then into our lakes and oceans? 7 billion people make a lot of pee - even if only half of them are on meds, that's still a lot of undigested meds contaminating the world's water.

It's a real poser. Hard to tell which particular chemical might be worse than another. So better not do anything about anything, right? Make sure we have a totally confirmed hierarchy of villains before we take action against any single one of them.

Bah.





usnews.msnbc.msn.c om
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 03:49 PM
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The only solution to combat this new threat is to release millions of GM honey bees. You already have a healthy base of research with all the GM plants. Just a small jump really.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 03:56 PM
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Wired dot com did a story on the subject as well.

This type of pesticide has worldwide consequences. There is only one corporation that comes to mind and can have that kind of impact.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:04 PM
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Out here in west Texas there are no streams or natural lakes of any kind (I don't count any natural small springs, which by now have dried up because the aquifer has been somewhat depleted). The bees act retarded and slow, and my husband, who grew up out here and was born in the 1950s, says that there used to be a lot of frogs after the spring rains, but they are all gone now because of the pesticides used in the farm fields. The last time he was aware of frogs being around after the rains was in the 1980s.

There aren't enough people out here to blame sewage. The only logical culprits are pesticides, herbicides and GMO cotton.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:08 PM
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Infowars has this as one of their main page picture stories right now as well, although they are just mirroring the msnbc link.

www.infowars.com...



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by MeesterB
 


Actually.....

GM honey bees already exist......

Killer Bees..



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:34 PM
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What these people do not tell you is that today honey bees are treated like any other cash crop, they are pumped full of anti-biotics. The bees that are dying are mostly from bee farms which are inbred, lack genetic diversity and therefore are more prone to infections. And bees die all the time they have thousands of eggs and only live 40-50 days. So the media tells you what to see and then you see it.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:37 PM
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Originally posted by DaMod
reply to post by MeesterB
 


Actually.....

GM honey bees already exist......

Killer Bees..


A natural news reader i see. Killer bees are not Genetically modified, they were selectively bred like all the other honey bees.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:43 PM
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Interestingly it is the French once again who seem to be driving awareness of the effects of this pesticide on bees, and particularly it's relationship to colony collapse disorder.

So far they are the only country taking pro-active action to fully test and ban pesticides that are harmful to pollinators...


The agency also said it evaluated clothianidin based on 34 scientific studies and that the chemical poses less risk to workers and wildlife than alternatives. While data show clothianidin is toxic to honeybees, the EPA says there's no proven link to bee colony die-offs from exposure to the chemical.

Some researchers disagree. And while no one has been able to determine what causes colony collapse, most researchers point to a combination of factors, including pesticide contamination.


www.msnbc.msn.com...

For most countries, it seems the emphasis is on preventing complaints and law suits from human employees and for loss of livestock...and the effect that that this may have on the food chain is completely disregarded.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 



French researchers tagged 650 honeybees with tiny microchips attached to their necks
in a study which tracked all the bee movements.

Researchers found that the pesticides are preventing bees from
finding their way back to the hive



Half the bees were exposed to low doses of insecticide similar to what they would find in the wild, and when released, these ones were found to be two or three times more likely to die away from their hive.

Neo-nicotoinoids, based on the chemical nicotine, were introduced as an insecticide in the 1990s, and have become the most popular for crops and gardens in the world.

www.dailymail.co.uk...

RFID Tracking of Sublethal Effects of Two Neonicotinoid Insecticides
on the Foraging Behavior of Apis mellifera


www.plosone.org...


edit on 29-3-2012 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 05:09 PM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


No possibility that it was the microchips or the method used to insert microchips?



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 05:09 PM
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As for pesticide use, USDA data shows that GM crops has increased pesticide use by 50 million pounds from 1996 to 2003 in the U.S., and the use of glyphosate went up more than 15-fold between 1994 and 2005, along with increases in other herbicides to cope with rising glyphosate resistant superweeds.

articles.mercola.com...

so ever increasing bad on bad



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 05:22 PM
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As seen above, it is certain that the digestive shutdown is due to hard material in the digestive tract that compromises the immune system. Circulatory problems would without doubt. Could it be that humans are going through the same process with the rise of Colon Cancer? As seen below in the comparison of the healthy Bee and the unhealthy bee, it is obvious that the bees that are ingesting GMO pollen are having severe digestive problems, so severe that the disease is terminal.


globalresearch.ca...

seems comparable to the intestinal problems that aninimals and man are experiencing which they say is a result of ingesting PESTICIDES connected to GMOs


Pioneer Hi-Bred's website boasts that their genetically modified (GM) Liberty Link corn survives doses of Liberty herbicide, which would normally kill corn. The reason, they say, is that the herbicide becomes "inactive in the corn plant." They fail to reveal, however, that after you eat the GM corn, some inactive herbicide may become reactivated inside your gut and cause a toxic reaction. In addition, a gene that was inserted into the corn might transfer into the DNA of your gut bacteria, producing long-term effects. These are just a couple of the many potential side-effects of GM crops that critics say put the public at risk.

www.organicconsumers.org...


edit on 29-3-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by DavidWillts
 


The RFID were not inserted, from the study.

Yeah, it could not possible be the Neonicotinoid.

/end Sarcasm

Well......

If the USDA would ever publish the study it did, the truth would be known.


The American study ... has demonstrated that the insects’ vulnerability to infection is increased by the presence of imidacloprid, even at the most microscopic doses. Dr. Pettis and his team found that increased disease infection happened even when the levels of the insecticide were so tiny that they could not subsequently be detected in the bees, although the researchers knew that they had been dosed with it.

grist.org


the lead researcher at the USDA’s very own Bee Research Laboratory completed research two years ago suggesting that even extremely low levels of exposure to neonicotinoids makes bees more vulnerable to harm from common pathogens.



So why on earth are they still in use on million of acres of American farmland?



edit on 29-3-2012 by burntheships because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 09:47 PM
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I keep bees and also raise roses...been using nicotine for aphids for years....never hurt my hives but this new stuff is deadly



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 12:12 AM
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There are many places mirroring this story www.pittsburghlive.com... Kind of scary



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 01:49 AM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


I posted something on this too. This is a very important story, vital to national security and global security. Thanks for posting!



posted on Mar, 31 2012 @ 08:10 AM
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UPDATE: daaskapital found this BBC article: Pesticides hit queen bee numbers

From the BBC:



Writing in the journal Science, the groups note that bee declines in many countries are reducing crop yields.

In the UK alone, pollination is calculated to be worth about £430m to the national economy.

...The neonicotinoids investigated in the two Science papers are used on crops such as cereals, oilseed rape and sunflowers.

Often the chemical is applied to seeds before planting. As the plant grows, the pesticide is contained in every part of it, deterring insect pests such as aphids.

But it also enters the pollen and nectar, which is how it can affect bees.

...After six weeks, colonies exposed to the pesticide were lighter than the others, suggesting that workers had brought back less food to the hive.

But the most dramatic effect was on queen production. The naturally-fed hives produced around 14 queens each - those exposed to the pesticide, just two.





edit on 31/3/12 by soficrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2012 @ 11:42 AM
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As an apiarist in Ohio, I have been researching this topic a lot. What you are referring to is related to CCD (Colony Collapse Disorder). There is no consensus on what causing CCD, but studies are showing that it is linked to 4 things, and possible the combination of all four:

1) Pesticides on crops.
2) Mites on bees.
3) Antibiotics used to treat bees.
4) Stress caused by hive moving hives for seasonal crop pollination.

We lost 1 hive this spring, it didn't die, it disappeared. Any beekeeper can expect a natural loss of 20% of their hives over winter, and we experienced a 25% loss. At first, it looked to us as a classic case of CCD, so I became seriously interested in my CCD research.

The symptoms of CCD are when a hive simply disappears, virtually overnight. They leave behind the queen, and a few workers, but not enough to support the hive, and the hive collapses. Basically, the whole hive collapses because, for still unknown reasons, the workers abandon the hive, get lost, whatever, but they never return, and the remaining queen and workers can't keep the rest of the hive warm, and there aren't enough bees to feed and care for the hive. Normal hive population coming from an over-winter should be about 30,000.

We did a frame by frame inspection of our "disappeared" hive, and found no queen dead in the hive. There were only a handful (less than 50) of dead bees total. All the honey was gone, there was no fresh or rotted brood, but there was two hatched queen cells, and 12 aborted queen cells. Basically, with our hive, it swarmed three times, each swarm taking a supply of honey, the old queen leaving first, then a new queen with her swarm, then finally the third queen took the rest of the honey all but the last few bees, and we wound up with an abandoned hive, in perfectly good shape, sans honey and bees. There must be a certain percentage of bees in a hive for temperature regulation, (core temp needs to stay around 95 degrees F) and without enough bees to generate heat, the remaining bees were doomed to die. Inspection of the other hives showed no abnormal activity, they were still honey bound, and producing fresh white brood. Healthy as hives can be during the spring pollen flow.

I am confused by this:



only have 2 Queen Bees instead of the normal 14.


A normal healthy hive only has 1 queen at any given time. You'll have to clarify that a bit, but let me continue:

A hive knows when their queen is healthy and happy because she is laying eggs. She is responsible for producing replacement bees. When a queen is old, or not laying properly, the hive will start building "queen cells", enacting a process called "supercedure", in which the hive will produce a new queen to replace the old one, and then the old queen will take a portion of the hive and swarm. This is usually done in the early spring or early fall, but usually during the spring. Supercedure is a perfectly natural process, one in which the hive creates their own genetically superior queen adapted to the local in which they forage from.

Studies have shown that commercially produced queens are being "superceded" by the hives (meaning replaced) at at 80% percent rate, in the hives they are introduced to. Queen bees are supposed to live for 3-5 years normally, but now the commercial queens are being replaced 12-14 times a years, as opposed to the normal 1-2 times a year. Why?

Commercial bee producers are treating their hives with antibiotics. The commercial bees are foraging in their environment, and gathering pollen from fields with pesticide residue, and gathering pollen and nectar from flowers that have also been treated. The current trend is to ship truckloads of hives to areas where fields need pollinated, often across the US, usually to California to pollinate the almond crops, then to Florida to polliate the Peach crops, up to Maine to pollinate blueberries, and hive transportation is a very lucrative way to make cash, as farmers pay the commercial bee keepers for their services. The farmers don't have the headache of keeping their own bees, and have become dependent on out-sourcing the bees they need for pollination. There is a problem with this, a very big one.

A normal bee will forage for a radius of 10 miles from their hive. The pollen and nectar they collect is brought back into the hive to be processed into honey. The pesticides used in CA are brought in trace amounts to FL, re-distributed in ME, and at each location the bees are sampling the local variety of pesticide and dosage, and suddenly a hive is saturated with a blend of 3 or more varieties of pesticides, and the queen becomes contaminated, and genetically, can no longer lay normally. The hive will promptly supercede a queen that is not laying properly. It takes 21 days for a hive to produce another egg-laying queen, so the hive misses pollen flows, and becomes weaker overall.



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