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Does Boiling Water Really Make It Safe To Drink?

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posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:05 PM
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Im just wondering if my only means of water was from a pond will boiling it before drinking it really make it safe to drink? Or is that just a myth?




posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by eyesontheskies
 


Boiling the water will sterilize it against micro-organisms, and make sure they are not present, or thoroughly devastated and inactive.

However, toxic byproducts that micro-organisms can produce by either just normal functioning, or by the process of dying, or by the process of being heated, might still remain.

And obviously, boiling will not remove rock sediments, heavy metals, or any metals for that matter, motor oil contamination, etc.

At a minimum, boiled water will have no parasites, viruses, or bacteria, though. So it is highly effective if you are getting your water from an area with low industrial pollutants in the area.

ETA: You can buy portable filters that have a mesh that will filter out most larger particles (sediments) that water will easily flow through and does not need to be mechanically forced through. They are cheap; I would recommend anyone have them. Even filtering the water first through a T-shirt is a great way to remove large particles like down to the size of silt, I would guess. I think clay (smaller than silt) might get through... but it might not.

Anyway, filter it first before the boil

edit on 3/29/2012 by CaticusMaximus because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:10 PM
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Filter the water through char, boil, rinse and repeat.

You'll have acceptable water for consumption. Also, after the filtration process it is best to shake the water as it will add more oxygen back into it, giving it a crisper taste.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:11 PM
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While there may be some rare pathogens (PRIONS) that totally survive cooking and boiling because the pathogen is the protein itself which is not completely denatured even in a rolling boil, I'd have to say imo it just makes it SAFER.

So pasteurization does not necessarily destroy prions. Ie if the water is contaminated with a drop of meat or blood from a madcow-infected or any human tissue (cannibalism almost always infects with prions, for some reason even if the human meat was cooked), it's possible prions will survive the boil and infect a person eventually, absorbed thru the gut and usually effecting the brain tissue.

Yeah dont forget RO water is best cuz boiling doesn't remove contaminants/chemicals, generally.

www.survivaltopics.com...



The fact is, with a water temperature of 160 to 165 degrees F (74 C) it takes just half an hour for all disease causing organisms to be inactivated. At 185 degrees this is cut to just a few minutes. By the time water hits its boiling point of 212 F (100 C) – plus or minus depending upon pressure or altitude – the water is safe. Even at high altitudes the time it takes for the water to reach a rolling boil and then cool means you can safely drink it.

edit on 29-3-2012 by BiggerPicture because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:11 PM
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Originally posted by CaticusMaximus
reply to post by eyesontheskies
 



And obviously, boiling will not remove rock sediments, heavy metals, or any metals for that matter, motor oil contamination, etc.



And for these cases, distilling should clear the water of these pollutants, although I am not sure if distilling will take care of the heavy metals but it should for everything else.
edit on 29-3-2012 by Skewed because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:17 PM
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Originally posted by Skewed

Originally posted by CaticusMaximus
reply to post by eyesontheskies
 



And obviously, boiling will not remove rock sediments, heavy metals, or any metals for that matter, motor oil contamination, etc.



And for these cases, distilling should clear the water of these pollutants, although I am not sure if distilling will take care of the heavy metals but it should for everything else.
edit on 29-3-2012 by Skewed because: (no reason given)


Absolutely, distill if you can. RO it if possible even for maximum filtration, but Im thinking out in the field it might be difficult to do either of those things.

However Ive read about portable filters that do something like RO slowly in a small container. Berkey filters or something; havnt looked into it though. But we have to remember those filters do wear out after usage.

ETA: Its depressing we even have to talk about something like this.... It makes me sad I cannot just go to some body of fresh water and drink, because Id probably be drinking used motor oil and mercury.
edit on 3/29/2012 by CaticusMaximus because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by eyesontheskies
 




Does Boiling Water Really Make It Safe To Drink?,

Boiling water makes it safeR to drink.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 03:54 PM
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Originally posted by eyesontheskies
Im just wondering if my only means of water was from a pond will boiling it before drinking it really make it safe to drink? Or is that just a myth?


Boiling makes it safe from microbes, bacteria, etc. It does nothing to make it safe from pollution, contaminants, or poisons, and it doesn't make it taste any better. An activated charcoal filter is better for initial treatment, and then only boil if necessary. The only way to make certain it is safe would be to distill it, which can be done on site with a little bit of equipment and a fire, but that would be a major undertaking if you were in the woods or mobile. If it was for your home, it would probably be worthwhile to create a way to distill the water.

In most cases, if the animals are drinking it, and you boil it, then it is probably safe.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 03:59 PM
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Combine boiling with letting it sit in a barrel, like an old rain barrel, and it'll probably be okay. After all, "heavy" metals and so forth are heavy, and will sink if you give them time.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:11 PM
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I have an ceramic filter similar to a berkey
Mine has a pair of filters and is fairly quick

I would still recommend boiling, and a pre filter, like a britta pitcher to extend the life of the ceramics



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:15 PM
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Copper (and silver) vessels have a biocidal effect. Known for centuries!

From wiki en.wikipedia.org...

A new innovation is the use of copper and its alloys (brasses, bronzes, cupronickel, copper-nickel-zinc, and others) as biocidal surfaces to destroy a wide range of microorganisms (E. coli O157:H7, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus, Clostridium difficile, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and fungi).[2][3][4] The United States Environmental Protection Agency has approved the registration of 355 different antimicrobial copper alloys that kill E. coli O157:H7, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in less than 2 hours of contact. As a public hygienic measure in addition to regular cleaning, antimicrobial copper alloys are being installed in healthcare facilities[5] and in a subway transit system.[6][7][8]
edit on 29-3-2012 by oghamxx because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-3-2012 by oghamxx because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:43 PM
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About 100 ways to purify dirty/grey water... Like the first comment boiling alone won't do it. Make sure you give it atleast 2 min on a full boil. 1 gallon of bleach will treat about 4,000 gallons of water, but does have a slight taste from the bleach. If very despirate you can skip the boiling with bleach but only as a last resort. Charcole filters work great. Fill a 5 gallon bucket alternate layers with fine sand and charcole about 4 or 5 layers deep.

Reverse osmosis is the best but requires some work and ingenuity to build it from stuff found in your garage but it can be done... Once built it will work as long as you can supply it with power. A car alternator hooked to a wind mill should be plenty of power. Or for about $500 you could buy one. These new ceramic filters are rather cool. Haven't tried one but sounds like it works better than regular charcole. Plus it lasts longer.

Sorry went off topic a bit. I'm a survivalist/plumber so purifying water is my thing.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:51 PM
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Reverse osmosis would be the way to go. I saw a survival documentary this week where the guy planned to use his hotub water as drinking water after filtering it. It sounds gross but its a genius idea. An average hotub holds almost 700 gallons of water which is a 12 month supply for 2 people.
edit on 29-3-2012 by joyride0187 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:57 PM
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Originally posted by oghamxx
Copper (and silver) vessels have a biocidal effect. Known for centuries!

From wiki en.wikipedia.org...

A new innovation is the use of copper and its alloys (brasses, bronzes, cupronickel, copper-nickel-zinc, and others) as biocidal surfaces to destroy a wide range of microorganisms (E. coli O157:H7, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus, Clostridium difficile, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and fungi).[2][3][4] The United States Environmental Protection Agency has approved the registration of 355 different antimicrobial copper alloys that kill E. coli O157:H7, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in less than 2 hours of contact. As a public hygienic measure in addition to regular cleaning, antimicrobial copper alloys are being installed in healthcare facilities[5] and in a subway transit system.[6][7][8]
edit on 29-3-2012 by oghamxx because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-3-2012 by oghamxx because: (no reason given)


Silver oxide is best for anti-microbial but expensive.en.wikipedia.org.... This is why water pipes are copper the romans found out about the anti-microbial properties of copper. It's mainly to prevent bio-film build up in pipes. That bio-film is deadly. en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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Learn to distill water, especially for after tshtf, you can power distillation with wood. If you know how to build a fire.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 06:21 PM
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whiskey works well
and it hides the brown color in the swamp water
and it helps with the blues too...
for a while



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 06:25 PM
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reply to post by eyesontheskies
 


When I'm backpacking I usually boil water then pour it through a filter. Unless it's glacial runoff then to me it doesn't really matter, it's the best tasting water anywhere.

I know a few peoples who use a UV light, to me that just doesn't seem like it does anything. So be safe at least boil the water to kill living organisms.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 06:30 PM
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reply to post by JAY1980
 


Except Silver sometimes turns you blue.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 06:41 PM
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Originally posted by Rockpuck
reply to post by JAY1980
 


Except Silver sometimes turns you blue.

see whiskey above



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 06:47 PM
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Do not boil you urine... thats not safe



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