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Priceless ancient Greek statue rescued from goat-pen; goatherd arrested

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posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 12:43 AM
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Priceless ancient Greek statue rescued from goat-pen; goatherd arrested

So a goat herder is out herding his goats (I assume that's what goat herders do), when he stumbles across this priceless 2,500 year old Greek statue in his field. He digs it up and hides it in his goat-pen, then tries to sell it on the black market, for a mere $667,000 (€500,000). Archeologists estimate this 'priceless' statue at $16 million. Not sure how the police uncovered this caper, let's just assume the blackmarket for 2,500 year-old Kore statuary is fairly limited and easily monitored in our modern police state.

Photo: This 2,500-year-old statue of a young woman was illegally excavated and hidden in a goat-pen near Athens. Courtesy AP


The archaeological remains of civilizations stretching back thousands of years are spread all over Greece. By law, all antiquities are state property. But pillaging is a highly lucrative business.


So the lesson for all you goat-herders out there, the next time you find one of these in your backward, please don't hide it in your goat-pen, Western cultural heritage deserves better than that!




posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 12:48 AM
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Amazing!

I wish I could dig in my backyard and uncover a something even half as important as this. Of course somebody immediately thought of how much money they could make on it. Humanity.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 12:49 AM
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how dare a knowledgeable and respected pillar of the community like a goat-herder not realize he cant make money off of things he finds on his own land.

how dumb do you have to be to realize you dont actually have the right to own anything that you own?

dont they teach these guys anything useful in the goat-herding universities?

whats the saying again? something about finders... keepers... and losing.... OH i remember.. "finders must hand over to the state, keepers will lose freedom and weep"... thats it isnt it? i thought it rhymed for some reason...
edit on 29-3-2012 by BohemianBrim because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 01:15 AM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


They should throw the goat herder in prison.

They should also send all the money made from statue to the police so they can continue to make sure these criminal goat herders don't come across anything of value on their own property.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 01:23 AM
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Originally posted by BeforeTheHangmansNoose
reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


They should throw the goat herder in prison.

They should also send all the money made from statue to the police so they can continue to make sure these criminal goat herders don't come across anything of value on their own property.


So every time I find a Federal reserve note, printed by USof but owned by Federal reserve, Im supposed to mail them back?



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 01:24 AM
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reply to post by BohemianBrim
 


Most goat herders are hired workers, they rarely own their own land. Greek antiquity laws are quite strict and anything found must be sold to the Greek government.


Current scheme based on Greek Antiquities Law of 1932 and 1950. All antiquities on land and sea are the property of the State, which has the right to investigate and preserve them. Antiquities are broadly defined as "all works, without exception, of architecture, sculpture, graphic art and any art in general. . . and all other works and equipment in whatever material, including precious stones and coins."

b. Anyone finding antiquities or discovering them fortuitously must report the discovery to the authority; there are penalties for not doing so.

c. Antiquities may be freely imported (but must be declared); export can only be made after a decision of the Antiquities Council, and illegal export is punishable by a fine and up to five years imprisonment. Effectively, there is no export of antiquities.

d. Private collections of antiquities are allowed, but a permit is required from the Ministry of Education. Collectors must keep a detailed inventory and grant access to the Ministry for study, photography, etc.

e. All excavations of archaeological sites must be authorized by permit. Foreign schools are permitted three annual excavation permits. Otherwise the State may carry out excavations on national, municipal, religious, and private property, but must pay fair compensation to owners. Illegal excavations (including looting) may bring a prison term of up to two years as well as a monetary fine.

f. Intentional destruction or damage to antiquities carries a penalty of up to five years in prison and a fine.

g. Sales of antiquities are strictly regulated. A permit is required for dealers, who are under the authority of the archaeological authorities. Dealers must submit a monthly list of antiquities acquired by them and offered for sale. The State has the right of preemption in any sale of antiquities in the country. Sales from private collections must be approved by the Ministry.

h. The state antiquities service is the Greek Archaeological Service. There is also a non-governmental Archaeological Society.

i. Greece has ratified the Hague Convention and First Protocol, the 1970 UNESCO cultural property convention, and the 1972 World Heritage Convention.

ex]

Archaeological law in the 21st century



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:52 AM
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reply to post by chapterhouse
 


No, we pay taxes for that 'crime', so it's okay


It's sad to think how much awesome history has been lost to 'private collectors'. Poor goat herder, when you start playing with fire it usually gets you burned the first few times... I bet he wishes he'd stuck to goats.

At least this statue was found/reclaimed and will hopefully last longer in a museum. It's quite the awesome find! very simple and beautiful; it seems more true to the 'common' people of the time than most greek statues (being of gods and emperors), I've never heard of kouros statues. I love new discoveries, it makes me hopeful, that we still find missing info on our ancient backgrounds, that we may uncover some real perception bending artifacts.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 03:48 AM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Don't blame him what with the situation in Greece but i am glad this was discovered and recovered. Hopefully, upon further questioning, the location will be revealed - you never know, there may be more there.

I have to be honest and say i always dream of finding stuff too when out walking. I always check out stand alone copses of trees (popular with Vikings and Saxons for hiding valuables). Never found anything though.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 06:25 AM
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Bloody hell amazing find, great read.


I love how archeologists claim it to be priceless and afew words later put a price on it, make up your mind



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 10:03 AM
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Well I'm glad it was recovered and placed in a safer place. I'm sure the goats miss the decor in their pen.
I don't think I would try to sell something like that. I'd just like to have it setting in my living room. Ya know, hang a hat or coat on it. JK

I should go ahead and warn the ATSers here. If I ever acquire some land in Greece, I will be looking for such treasures. In the event that I find something, I will likely try to hide it. When they throw me in the slammer, please start a thread titled:
Texas Native jailed in Greece - Hides priceless, $16 million dollar statue under old hat.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 10:14 AM
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I'm sure that for a brief moment in time, that was the classiest goat-pen in the world.

Here's the original Greek news release, it has several more photos;
ΓΕΝΙΚΗ ΑΣΤΥΝΟΜΙΚΗ ΔΙΕΥΘΥΝΣΗ ΑΤΤΙΚΗΣ (Astynomia.gr)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Personally, i do not think it that good a statue! Each to their own though i guess and regardless of preferences i am pleased it has been recovered.

Guessing they are scouring the surrounding area for a few more then? These things aren't usually found in isolation are they?



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 11:08 AM
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reply to post by Flavian
 


I believe the article mentioned the criminal goatherd has been remanded to a proper CIA-run torture facility and is currently being water-boarded for the location this statue was found. Although I may be 'reading between the lines' a little too much.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 12:49 PM
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Originally posted by Sparta
Bloody hell amazing find, great read.


I love how archeologists claim it to be priceless and afew words later put a price on it, make up your mind


They mean the item cannot be replaced and should not be sold but on the black market it would be worth 'x'



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 01:20 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune

Originally posted by Sparta
I love how archeologists claim it to be priceless and afew words later put a price on it, make up your mind

They mean the item cannot be replaced and should not be sold but on the black market it would be worth 'x'

"Priceless" or "worthless," take your pick. It would be expensive for an individual to buy and own, but like so many other "priceless" artifacts, once they get stuck in a museum for everybody to see, they're worth a glance and a shrug. "Eh, nice sculpture."

What is anything really worth? Only what somebody might be willing to pay for it. It's not worth much to me. Fifty bucks, maybe. I'd have to find someplace to put it. I could stick it in my back yard to look at, I guess. Put a bird bath next to it.



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