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We are running out of water.

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posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 06:52 PM
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reply to post by cavalryscout
 


False argument.

You are right that potable water is a problem in some area's and only in those area's. Conserving water in areas where it is not an issue is worthless and won't help. You can't help out the water table in an area you don't live in, that is not affected by your water usage in another place. That's just a fact.

If you amend this too: people who live in areas where the potable water supply is at risk need to do a better job of conserving water, I'd agree. They would be crazy not too. Only they need to worry however.

You've maybe ran into the scam in Hotel Rooms and little signs on the beds about using linens and towels multiple times to save the planet? It is true if you happen to be in an area with a water shortage. However they put those in rooms in area's where no water shortage exists. They don't care about the water at all. It's to trick environmentally responsible people into helping them keep their laundry costs down. They know most people don't think clearly enough to realize they are in a Hotel that has abundant water available.

Back in the 1990's there was an article across the country about the scam and the fake non-profit that was selling the signs. People seemed to not care and now those signs are everywhere.

Yes to the environment, but also yes to common sense.




posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 07:00 PM
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reply to post by Blaine91555
 


You must not be aware that there is more to worry about when doing laundry than water shortage.

Power is a much bigger concern than water when it comes to commercial laundry.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 07:00 PM
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I linked this in my last post here, but can anyone verify it:
www.innovationnewsdaily.com ...

Thanks. It has me wondering.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 07:15 PM
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Arid places are getting hit by water shortages I think. Instead of building oil pipelines water pipelines could be built and pipe desalinated water from ocean side plants to places where it is needed.

I had a class in college where we had to take an old item and turn it into a resource, and my group came up with the idea to take old abandoned oil rigs and convert them to portable power generation systems and solar desalinization units. We thought that the free floating rigs could be used, once retrofitted, in a deployment like fashion to be stationed where they were needed, like sites of natural disasters. This idea of course would take some money and getting the right people to say yes, but the old oil rigs will just be let to rust out or sunk to create growth mediums for ocean life (if things will grow on them).



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 07:28 PM
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Originally posted by Furbs
reply to post by Blaine91555
 


You must not be aware that there is more to worry about when doing laundry than water shortage.

Power is a much bigger concern than water when it comes to commercial laundry.


So your an extremist and I'm not. I'm not going to run around in dirty clothes.

That sign in the Hotels is a scam and nothing more. It's all about money and never was about the environment.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 07:41 PM
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posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 08:01 PM
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reply to post by oghamxx
 


The great lakes are the largest freshwater supply in the world. I believe they hold a ridiculous amount like a third of the world's fresh water.

So I think Canada and the US can share like they do already.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by cavalryscout
 


desalination ,,,,, look it up ! we will never run out of water sheesh !



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 08:38 PM
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I live in Lousiana. Too bad we can't spread our water wealth.
Much more than we need down this way



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 09:01 PM
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reply to post by cavalryscout
 


hey cavalryscout,

I just moved to Phoenix last year and didn't know about this until last night as well
Some of my coworkers that have lived here there entire lives mentioned that this water table issue was why so many people moved out of the Queen Creek area a few years ago because of sink holes appearing in people's backyards overnight.....



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 09:10 PM
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Ultimately the problem is human psychology.

The highest common factor of all the solveable, but unsolved problems in the world, is the presence in the mix of paranoid psycho/sociopaths in positions of power.

They claw their way to the top of every society and then tune the world to their personal needs. And they are needy!

If you put the nuts in charge (and we do, as often as not), they will turn any institution they are involved with into a nuthouse.

As far as the water problem goes, check this thread: Greening the Sahara: A Simple Idea

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Posted from the Saudi Arabia of water.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 09:25 PM
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O.K. so Pakistan and India are already fighting over water

Then there's India stealing the water of Bangladesh


A recent report by correspondent John Vidal from Dhaka said : The ambitious Indian plans to link major rivers flowing from the Himalayas and divert them south to drought-prone areas are still on the drawing board, but Bangladeshi government scientists estimated that even a 10% to 20% reduction in the water flow to the country could dry out great areas for much of the year. More than 80% of Bangladesh's 20 million small farmers grow rice and depend on water that has flowed through India. "The idea of linking these rivers is very dangerous.It could affect the whole of Bangladesh and be disastrous," said Hafiz (uddin) Ahmad, the water resources minister. "The north of Bangladesh is already drying out after the Ganges was dammed by India in 1976. Now India is planning to do the same on [many of] the 53 other rivers that enter the country via India. Bangladesh depends completely on water."



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 09:32 PM
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You know the sad thing is people will read these articles and actually believe that us running out of water is a fact. Nothing could be further from the truth.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 09:38 PM
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reply to post by TheBlackManIsGod7
 



If water is pumped from many wells at a withdrawal rate in an aquifer that exceeds the natural recharge rate, the water table drops. As shown in the diagram, a cone of depression may form around a well. Depending upon the depth, other wells in the area may go dry. If this situation prevails for any significant amount of time, this is called water "mining". This may happen from rapid withdrawals for irrigation purposes from so called "fossil aquifers" which get very little if any recharge. Such "fossil aquifers" underlie the Sahara and Kalahari deserts in Africa, the Great Artesian Basin in Australia, the central Asia basins, and the Ogallala Aquifer in the western part the Midwest of the United States.


Why we are running out of water


It is commonly assumed that the worlds water supply is huge and infinite. This assumption is false. In fact, of all the water on Earth, only 2.5 percent is freshwater, and available freshwater represents less than half of 1 percent of the world's total water stock. The rest is seawater, or inaccessible in ice caps, ground water and soil. This supply is finite. As Allerd Stikker of the Amsterdam-based Ecological Management Foundation explains "The issue today, put simply, is that while the only renewable source of freshwater is continental rainfall (which generates a more or less constant global supply of 40,000 to 50,000 cubic km per year), the world population keeps increasing by roughly 85 million per year. Therefore the availability of freshwater per head is decreasing rapidly." Most disturbingly, we are diverting, polluting and depleting that finite source of freshwater at an astonishing rate. Today, says the United Nations, 31 countries are facing water stress and scarcity and over one billion people lack adequate access to clean drinking water. By the year 2025, as much as two-thirds of the world's population-predicted to have expanded by an additional 2.6 billion people-will be living in conditions of serious water shortage and one-third will be living in conditions of absolute water scarcity.


A global water crisis
edit on 29-3-2012 by fulllotusqigong because: (no reason given)




Destroying water's natural habitat not only creates a supply crisis for people and animals, it also dramatically diminishes the amount of available freshwater on the planet. Kraveik describes the hydrologic cycle of a drop of water. It must first evaporate from a plant, earth surface, swamp, river, lake or the sea, then fall back down to earth as precipitation. If the drop of water falls back onto a forest, lake, blade of grass, meadow or field, it cooperates with nature to return to the hydrologic cycle. "Right of domicile of a drop is one of the basic rights, a more serious right than human rights," says Kraveik. However, if the earth's surface is paved over, denuded of forests and meadows, and drained of natural springs and creeks, the drop will not form part of river basins and continental watersheds, where it is needed by people and animals, but head out to sea, where it will be stored. It is like rain falling onto a huge roof, or umbrella; everything underneath stays dry and the water runs off to the perimeter. The consequent reduction in continental water basins results in reduced water evaporation from the earth's surface, and becomes a net loss, while the seas begin to rise.

edit on 29-3-2012 by fulllotusqigong because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 09:43 PM
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We just had major flooding down here in New South Wales, Australia. There were even calls to shut down the desalination plant. I'm glad we have one though because drought always seems to follow floods. Who would have thought 20 years ago that you would be paying $3.00 for a bottle of water. Crazy.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 10:07 PM
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Water, one of the most abundant natural resources on the planet, something that is naturally produced daily, and we are running out of it. Lol come on now. If we are running out of water then we are running out of air too because I hear theres a shortage of oxygen and hydrogen.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 10:14 PM
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Another sheep posts a cabal document from the un

Fake scarcity

Do not fall for it

Anyone pushing false scarcity of water should be tar and feathered as they are doing the nwo false flag work



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 10:14 PM
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Originally posted by Voldemorton
reply to post by cavalryscout
 


hey cavalryscout,

I just moved to Phoenix last year and didn't know about this until last night as well
Some of my coworkers that have lived here there entire lives mentioned that this water table issue was why so many people moved out of the Queen Creek area a few years ago because of sink holes appearing in people's backyards overnight.....


No kidding? Didn't know that either...I don't get out much. I think I would be moving if a sink hole opened in my backyard.


I wonder if newtimes has done a story.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 10:20 PM
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reply to post by fulllotusqigong
 


Okay, I'm calling this out here:


Destroying water's natural habitat not only creates a supply crisis for people and animals, it also dramatically diminishes the amount of available freshwater on the planet. Kraveik describes the hydrologic cycle of a drop of water. It must first evaporate from a plant, earth surface, swamp, river, lake or the sea, then fall back down to earth as precipitation. If the drop of water falls back onto a forest, lake, blade of grass, meadow or field, it cooperates with nature to return to the hydrologic cycle. "Right of domicile of a drop is one of the basic rights, a more serious right than human rights," says Kraveik. However, if the earth's surface is paved over, denuded of forests and meadows, and drained of natural springs and creeks, the drop will not form part of river basins and continental watersheds, where it is needed by people and animals, but head out to sea, where it will be stored. It is like rain falling onto a huge roof, or umbrella; everything underneath stays dry and the water runs off to the perimeter. The consequent reduction in continental water basins results in reduced water evaporation from the earth's surface, and becomes a net loss, while the seas begin to rise.


The people who wrote this article must be thick in the head. Water returning to the oceans does NOT equal a "net loss" for our planet. If you read the above paragraph slowly, you'll see they are basically trying to say the following:

"Water does not evaporate from the oceans."

Complete and utter BS. Water DOES evap from our oceans, when it does this, it falls back to Earth in the form of fresh water known as RAIN.

We are NOT raising the ocean levels because of rain falling on paved streets and sidewalks.



While I agree that many places that are lacking water are lacking due to over population, over use of water (no water conservation), or drought, I also think that this article is being taken out of context.

For example, take a look at the Wikipedia, they too site the year 2025. BUT, you also have to make sure you read the whole thing:


However, some observers have estimated that by 2025 more than half of the world population will be facing water-based vulnerability.[10] A recent report (November 2009) suggests that by 2030, in some developing regions of the world, water demand will exceed supply by 50%


Source

Note that they said "estimated", AND that observation was from here:


Kulshreshtha, S.N (1998). "A Global Outlook for Water Resources to the Year 2025". Water Resources Management


So this was observed back in 1998, 14 years ago. Has anyone looked to see if things have changed in that decade and a half since that report was written?
Notice how the last part of that paragraph says:


A recent report (November 2009) suggests that by 2030, in some developing regions of the world, water demand will exceed supply by 50%


A more recent report than the 1998 one, AND it's citing "developing regions of the world".

While I do agree that we should all practice water conservation, be respectful of our environment, and regions of the world that are hard hit due to things like drought, the thread title here is basically false, and fear mongering.

We are NOT running out of water. Some places are misusing their water, not practicing water conservation, developing water sheds, or introducing enough water projects to help populations.

However, the Earth itself is not running out of water. The article above that you cited would have you believe that water that hits the sewers goes to the oceans and that water from the oceans does not evaporate, form rain clouds and rain again. People might use water faster than the water table can restock itself, but again, that means they are not practicing water conservation correctly, or city planners are failing to take things like that into account.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by SuperTripps
 


You are right and exact.




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