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Student Loans and Inability to Repay

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posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 12:54 AM
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Something Changed in the 1990s



edit on 29-3-2012 by dr_strangecraft because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 01:04 AM
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I can tell you from first hand experience you will pay this debt whether you like it or not.
I strongly urge not letting this go to default it will increase your debt considerably.
Just make an agreement to pay them some amount every month.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 01:32 AM
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I told my dad about this post and i think he had some simple but good advice if you have balls his words not mine


Look for big company's where they have a IT division that is a big part of that company. he recommends looking in to General Dynamics. he said after he got out of college he got a job with them as he heard they were a good company to work for(he has only ever worked for them 35+ yrs now). And he knows for a fact there always accepting people with the right degrees to go off to Afghanistan he said its dangerous but after a year of work over there you'll have around 40-70k after taxes depending on the position. its perfect for a young single guy with a bit of balls.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:04 AM
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Originally posted by edgecrusher2199
reply to post by Starchildren
 


Not to destroy your hopes, but I have a friend in his early 30's working on a 2nd Master's in Psychology...he is still unable to find work


No that's okay. I'm being realistic about my degrees. My sister does have a B.S. in Psych and never seems to have trouble finding various jobs. So that's one thing giving me a bit of hope.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:23 AM
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I feel bad about saying this but I will say it anyway. I'm glad most of the other college students are under the impression that simply going to college will get them a good job. Because when we both apply for the same job, my chances are going to be much higher than theirs. I mean seriously, you can't just take out student loans to go to school and hope that by going to school you will get a job. It doesn't work that way.

You need to stand out, make yourself known. Work hard in school, maintain a good gpa, anything under a 3.0 is terrible for your future. Your goal should be to graduate with over a 3.5 gpa. Even with the gpa, your chances are slim if you have no references. This is where making yourself known comes into play. Join clubs relating to the field you want to work in, if there isn't one start one. Put yourself out there, talk to instructors and professors outside of class, if you're a good student and he/she likes you they usually wont mind writing a letter of recommendation. Ever hear of internship? Yeah, that can help a lot. Do this and be willing to relocate and you will find a good job in your field. Oh and one more thing, I hope you aren't expecting to earn whatever a quick google search leads you to believe the "average" pay in your field is, it may very well be the average pay in the field but you probably aren't going to start there.

I hate it when people try to tell others not to go to school because student loans will crush them. That is, in my opinion, a half truth. Lack of responsibility is what will crush you. You have to be smart about it. If you don't have a completely free ride you might no be able to major in History, English, Bluegrass, or Basket Weaving - the jobs are scarce. If you know for an absolute fact that you can and will be responsible enough to do what is needed, then fine, go for it, plan to be an English professor, just be willing to relocate. However, if you aren't going to prove that you are one of the best men/women for the job and do not want to move to the job, don't pick something that there aren't many jobs available in.

At the end of the day, even after landing an acceptable job in your field of choice, you are still going to have to learn to live within your means, especially while paying back student loans. I don't care what you do, you are going to have to pay. If you do things correctly you will still have more money in your pocket even with student loans, than you would have if you just jump into a job in fast food or a grocery or department store. And remember, trades do still exist, a pell grant will pay the costs of learning a trade.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:33 AM
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I would just like to add that I am also a Psychology major. I'm doing it not only because of the fact that I am very interested in the particular field but also for many personal reasons. Hang in there fellow psych majors, don't listen to the naysayers, they're most likely basing their opinion on assumption anyway. Just remember, you're going to have to go to the job, it wont come to you - not in this economy.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by AnIntellectualRedneck
 


Sorry if I came across as a little impatient with it all, I've been in a mood lately.

I didn't realize there is so much pressure out there to get a college degree. I guess I didn't see that angle coming because I for one am not going to pressure my daughter into doing anything she doesn't want to do. She's 12 and she has her mind set right now at being an equine veterinarian. I'm doing the homework now for her to see how the field is opportunity wise, what kind of degrees are needed and whether the ratio of how much it all costs vs. the average salaries even makes it worth her while.

I know it's a "stable" career field ( excuse the pun) and has been for quite some time. The fact that the higher end the clients are the less likely the job in question is going to be dependant on the economy as a whole. With that, certain employers want certain degrees from certain schools and internships are always something to think about. Just like in the regular health care industry.

I know we're still 6 years out before before we have to really act on this, but this is my daughters well being I'm talking about. I want to make sure I do all I can to help her get solid footing when she gets out on her own. I guess I just don't understand why some parents want to force their kids to do what the PARENTS think is the right thing and then see their own children fall flat on their financial face. That kind of decision making is shortsighted at best.I think this happens because the parents aren't thinking clearly and in advance about the realities of the job market and how competitive and complex it all is.

I really don't see how if you do your homework years in advance like this......how you can fail. I want my daughter to succeed in ways I never did, so by showing her that you have to think and plan ahead, not only will I have some good, solid leads lined up for her, she'll see HOW it was done and hopefully take that facet of a work ethic with her into the real world.




posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by Taupin Desciple
 


Oh gosh, I sure hope what happened in my family does not happen in yours!

You sound like my family a few years ago, when my step-daughter wanted to be an architect. We all knew she was smart and talented, and we were thrilled no end that she was motivated and wanted to do something she was passionate about that also pays well. Man, we thought she was all set and we were ready to go! She was so self motivated that she took all the architecture classes she could, in High School. "GREAT!" we thought, "she'll have a leg up and do fantastic in college."

Now, in her senior year, she blows us away... No longer the slightest bit interested in architecture. Been there done that and bored with it. She's way more social and doesn't want to work at such a loner job. Now, she loves standing out in a crowd, wants to give presentations. She threw architecture down the "boring" drain.
Now, she wants to be a Communications major. She believes that she will immediately become established and can quickly make $80k a year.

You can lead a horse to water, but can not make it drink. I would love to skip the soap opera that I will be forced to watch over the next few years, as she comes to terms with reality. I really would.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 11:10 PM
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Originally posted by Bixxi3
I told my dad about this post and i think he had some simple but good advice if you have balls his words not mine


Look for big company's where they have a IT division that is a big part of that company. he recommends looking in to General Dynamics. he said after he got out of college he got a job with them as he heard they were a good company to work for(he has only ever worked for them 35+ yrs now). And he knows for a fact there always accepting people with the right degrees to go off to Afghanistan he said its dangerous but after a year of work over there you'll have around 40-70k after taxes depending on the position. its perfect for a young single guy with a bit of balls.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 09:59 PM
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If I was that far in debt I would just drop everything and move to Taiwan to teach English.



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