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Vogue Editor Forces 7 yr old Daughter On Diet

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posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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Originally posted by earthdude
A chubby 7 year old is a good thing. Kids expand and contract as they grow. The child's weight at any age does not have much to do with how much they will weigh as an adult. Imagine learning as a 7 year old that children have no food in places like Africa, and at the same time you are being denied food. It confuses little minds.


I agree on this as well. My daughter for almost all of her life was in the 95% for height and weight, but she was never overweight because her height balanced it out. I think if a doctor says they're overweight, then please, go about it the right way. They don't need more confusion, this world is confusing enough for them.




posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:00 PM
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Originally posted by hapablab

Originally posted by happyhomemaker29

Originally posted by Dilligaf28
One could argue that the mother set up the daughter for future eating disorders; one could, with equal validity, argue that the mother "nipped" an eating disorder "in the bud" before the progression of that disorder went to far.

Overeating is as much of an eating disorder as anorexia. As someone that grew up obese and subsequently lost 135 pounds I side with the mother on this one. Perhaps if one of my relatives had taken this kind of decisive action my eating disorder would not have progressed to the point that I had 135 pounds to lose.



I agree that the mother was trying to be helpful, but I think she just went about it the wrong way. I think if she had just taught healthy eating and fun exercises, such as bike riding, jump rope, etc... that might have worked better than what she did. When you tend to outlaw certain foods, you tend to make someone want it more. That's all I'm saying.


I don't think she was trying to be helpful at all, I think she's a mean vindictive spiteful b word who has let the fashion industry influlence her to the point of passing it on to her child. I am not in anyway shooting what you say down, but I read another article about this woman violently (in her own words) "Ripped the cup from his hands and spill it down the sink", keep in mind the cruelty of taking her daughter for a hot chocolate and then to let this little girl watch her take it away, this woman knew that yes hot chocolate has a lot of calories, I knew that and I don't drink it, but the sadistic nature in taking this little girl for it and having this child see it taken a way like that, shows this woman is not nice, but a cruel person.


I can see it from your point of view. I don't know the mother but whose to say how she was raised and if she knew any better. I do think if her daughter were on a diet, she could have very least asked Starbucks to make her daughter a non-fat hot chocolate that had less calories but still allowed the child to have her drink. I DO however, think she went about everything in the wrong way and by putting her article in the magazine, she opened herself up to a large amount of criticism.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:44 PM
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Originally posted by happyhomemaker29

Originally posted by hapablab

Originally posted by happyhomemaker29

Originally posted by Dilligaf28
One could argue that the mother set up the daughter for future eating disorders; one could, with equal validity, argue that the mother "nipped" an eating disorder "in the bud" before the progression of that disorder went to far.

Overeating is as much of an eating disorder as anorexia. As someone that grew up obese and subsequently lost 135 pounds I side with the mother on this one. Perhaps if one of my relatives had taken this kind of decisive action my eating disorder would not have progressed to the point that I had 135 pounds to lose.



I agree that the mother was trying to be helpful, but I think she just went about it the wrong way. I think if she had just taught healthy eating and fun exercises, such as bike riding, jump rope, etc... that might have worked better than what she did. When you tend to outlaw certain foods, you tend to make someone want it more. That's all I'm saying.


I don't think she was trying to be helpful at all, I think she's a mean vindictive spiteful b word who has let the fashion industry influlence her to the point of passing it on to her child. I am not in anyway shooting what you say down, but I read another article about this woman violently (in her own words) "Ripped the cup from his hands and spill it down the sink", keep in mind the cruelty of taking her daughter for a hot chocolate and then to let this little girl watch her take it away, this woman knew that yes hot chocolate has a lot of calories, I knew that and I don't drink it, but the sadistic nature in taking this little girl for it and having this child see it taken a way like that, shows this woman is not nice, but a cruel person.


I can see it from your point of view. I don't know the mother but whose to say how she was raised and if she knew any better. I do think if her daughter were on a diet, she could have very least asked Starbucks to make her daughter a non-fat hot chocolate that had less calories but still allowed the child to have her drink. I DO however, think she went about everything in the wrong way and by putting her article in the magazine, she opened herself up to a large amount of criticism.


spot on!, the non fat thing that never crossed my mind, exactly. I think she put it in the article to boast, like look at me. I think she's narcsisstic. (I know I spelled that wrong lol)



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 08:36 PM
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Originally posted by hapablab

Originally posted by happyhomemaker29

Originally posted by hapablab

Originally posted by happyhomemaker29

Originally posted by Dilligaf28
One could argue that the mother set up the daughter for future eating disorders; one could, with equal validity, argue that the mother "nipped" an eating disorder "in the bud" before the progression of that disorder went to far.

Overeating is as much of an eating disorder as anorexia. As someone that grew up obese and subsequently lost 135 pounds I side with the mother on this one. Perhaps if one of my relatives had taken this kind of decisive action my eating disorder would not have progressed to the point that I had 135 pounds to lose.



I agree that the mother was trying to be helpful, but I think she just went about it the wrong way. I think if she had just taught healthy eating and fun exercises, such as bike riding, jump rope, etc... that might have worked better than what she did. When you tend to outlaw certain foods, you tend to make someone want it more. That's all I'm saying.


I don't think she was trying to be helpful at all, I think she's a mean vindictive spiteful b word who has let the fashion industry influlence her to the point of passing it on to her child. I am not in anyway shooting what you say down, but I read another article about this woman violently (in her own words) "Ripped the cup from his hands and spill it down the sink", keep in mind the cruelty of taking her daughter for a hot chocolate and then to let this little girl watch her take it away, this woman knew that yes hot chocolate has a lot of calories, I knew that and I don't drink it, but the sadistic nature in taking this little girl for it and having this child see it taken a way like that, shows this woman is not nice, but a cruel person.


I can see it from your point of view. I don't know the mother but whose to say how she was raised and if she knew any better. I do think if her daughter were on a diet, she could have very least asked Starbucks to make her daughter a non-fat hot chocolate that had less calories but still allowed the child to have her drink. I DO however, think she went about everything in the wrong way and by putting her article in the magazine, she opened herself up to a large amount of criticism.


spot on!, the non fat thing that never crossed my mind, exactly. I think she put it in the article to boast, like look at me. I think she's narcsisstic. (I know I spelled that wrong lol)



Bah! I'm not the Grammar police. But in all honesty, I never looked at it like that.
That is certainly possible though. The scary thing is by writing this, she's advocating this system of hers. How many other parents will have their kids go to bed without supper because they're too fat in their, or their doctor's opinion, rather than put them on a healthy lifestyle change?



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