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The smell conspiracy

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posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 03:53 AM
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Originally posted by manicminxx
You can also just buy 100% sea salt deodorant sticks...


I notice the smell of my body really changes if I get anxious or upset. Animal smells are interesting things...
Yeah but that wouldn't sound very cool to a teenager would it.

Yeah a lot of people sweat when they are anxious, could explain why cool and calm people are generally more popular in schools although this is probably more of a body language thing.

I enjoy the smell of lizards



CX

posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:09 AM
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Originally posted by Domo1
I know alot of low.class guys use axe.spray... but that is relatively new.


Very much an individual thing though, yes i can see that Axe is one of the cheap makes here, but to be honest, it's the same as with aftershaves, you get cheap ones that smell nice, and expensive ones that smell like.....well you know.


Not sure that class has much to do with it.

CX.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 09:10 AM
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Originally posted by IgnorantSpecies
- Rise in violent sex crimes. While one scent becomes unilateral it may drive lust and sexual drive to either people without it or people with it.


Actually, I kind of agree with that one and on a lesser level, the wrong smell could remind a man of his mother or grandmother, especially the scents of vanilla or roses. Then the man will treat a woman like his granny.

I haven't purchased deodorant since 2003 or before and I live in the Arizona desert. All deodorant does is clog the sweat pores making a smelly situation worse.

Since I live in the desert, what I do instead is rubbing alcohol or those scented rubbing alcohols. Swipe them over my armpits to clean and sterilize all the sweat glands. So no smell. I especially like the exotic fruit scented hand sanitizers (made from primarily rubbing alcohol) that you can get from Bath & Bodyworks. They come in portable mini-totes. Even ones for the car in a holder to go over the mirror. So I always smell like exotic strawberries, peaches, apples, mandarin oranges or whatever fruit scents are in season. A quick swipe over the armpits, back of neck or wherever and all sweat glands and smelly sweat instantly sanitized.

And I never smell like anyone's ex-girlfriend and I never smell like some man's mom or granny.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 09:55 AM
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Great topic OP. Thanks for the work you've done, I have been fascinated by the subject ever since puberty because of a devastating (to me at the time) incident at school. Briefly:

There was some chorale performance I was in, and it required dressing up. I wore some kind of satiny shirt that trapped my body heat, and as a result of the stress, sweat quite a bit. I was young enough to skip deo and not have a problem a lot of the time. The boy who sat next to me got a whiff and just went haywire-he went around telling people I didn't bathe,didn't wear deodorant, etc for months!! Seriously, it was crazy, and I was mortified, of course.

Scent travels directly to the reptilian brain, bypassing the cerebral cortex, this is why I've often thought that we become addicted to the scent of lovers, and can be transported in time by scent. It is a huge component of our perception of the world and each other. Doesn't someone's scent inform you of their habits to a great degree? Do they reek of something? Or are they concealed behind a chemical wall?

The Novel Perfume by Patrick Suskind is an excellent read for those interested in the subject. Set in a time before scent was obliterated by hygienic practice, only covered by manufactured perfume designed to mask the odors of animal & human excrement in the street, fish stalls, slaughter houses, etc. Think of the nobleman with the perfumed hanky.

When exactly did widespread deodorant use come into being? I'm thinking 40's or 50's, I know my grandparents as teenagers were not troubled by peer ridicule for smelling like a human in the early 20's, but, they were country people...the function of deo essentially obscures connection to the body, and makes us ashamed of a perfectly natural phenomenon. We are blind to each other in that respect also.

I am enjoying the thread very much all contributions excellent.
edit on 26-3-2012 by Pilot because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 11:03 AM
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Unilever makes lots of things!

Ben and Jerry's Ice Cream is one of them! Go VT!!

Anywho, my mother works for B+J and they have a store where you can get
Unilever products for dirt cheap! I have a collection of Axe flavors. All for like 1.15! lol

So I may smell like a unilateral chemical, but hot damn, m'lady loves it!!



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by MapMistress
 




the wrong smell could remind a man of his mother or grandmother, especially the scents of vanilla or roses. Then the man will treat a woman like his granny.

Good point. I was trying to say in the OP that it could be going either way.



All deodorant does is clog the sweat pores making a smelly situation worse.
You can get natural ones that wont, the ones that dont have a thousand chemicals in them.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 08:22 PM
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How awful that we have to talk to somebody to get to know them instead of sniffing their armpits to see if they are of breeder quality.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 08:36 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
How awful that we have to talk to somebody to get to know them instead of sniffing their armpits to see if they are of breeder quality.
I don't think you understand the aim of this thread, likewise you underestimate the power of chemical attraction.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 02:38 AM
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reply to post by IgnorantSpecies
 


Thanks, good thread. For me the experience of "smelling" cleaners like Pine-Sol is horrible, as is the realm of "air fresheners". Run the other way. In a free enterprise system it seems corporations are free to poison the people, with really no government crackdown. I'd say just keep away from all products which smell of chemicals, and discontinue use of the ones that are supposed to go on the skin!



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 04:19 AM
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reply to post by IgnorantSpecies
 


Fantastic thread! I really do hope you got an applause for this one


Smell (IMO) plays a bigger role than what we realize, and we will no doubt get even greater insight into its workings and the mechanism behind smell / hormones / and the hardwiring of it into our brains when future research is done.

What has always confounded me is the instant memories that are triggered when I smell a certain scent. Often there would be an association in my mind with a smell and a person - and often this association makes no sense at all. As an example - I could walk into a room and catch whiff of some jasmine flowers, and immediately the memory of a certain individual would spring to mind (even though that individual does not associate in my mind with jasmine flowers). But it would be more than a mere memory - that scent would evoke what feels like a very real physical encounter with that human. Difficult to explain... Anyhow, I suppose this explains it somewhat:


...the olfactory nerve is located very close to the amygdala, the area of the brain that is connected to the experience of emotion as well as emotional memory. In addition, the olfactory nerve is very close to the hippocampus, which is associated with memory as you learned earlier in this article. The actual ability to smell is highly linked to memory. Research has shown that when areas of the brain connected to memory are damaged, the ability to identify smells is actually impaired. In order to identify a scent, you must remember when you have smelled it before and then connect it to visual information that occurred at the same time.


Scent can be a powerful memory trigger

Very interesting question that you posed. How would artificial scent introduced on such a massive scale influence the hardwired connection of smell to the brain? I am certain that the long-term effect can not be good, and that the type of brain-connections made will definitely change in structure and shape, perhaps even bringing about a small but definitive change in the way we think and conceptualize. S+F



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 05:42 AM
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Off topic, I know, but when I saw the topic title I thought this was what you had discovered.

Your olfactory sense is the only one that goes to the brain without much processing. It goes to your limbic and hippocampal areas, and evokes emotional and memory responses directly. Part of that is a designed-in system to keep you from poisoning yourself with the jolly shiny fruit on that tree over there, or having done so once, to forever recall it so that you do not do so again. You likely have had an experience with that particular part of your brain if you ever ate so much of something you got sick, or became ill with a stomach virus immediately after a memorable food. Smelling that again instantly triggers the memory/emotion of puking, and makes it difficult to eat or drink the food you've associated with illness.

Smell also evokes memories directly, and often more intensely than you normally recall. Thus when you smell the smell of a person, or your old dorm room at school, or whatnot, you will instantly be "transported" back to a pleasant or memorable time. There's an "Army" smell, a "Navy" smell, diesel exhaust smells like dive training (but not tanks or jets?!) Hoppes # 9 has an odor that actually makes me have a positive emotional reaction, not sure what the hell that one is, maybe because we always used it at home when I was a kid. I'm not sure what makes the odors in some cases. But if I smell that scent, I'm back there.

You get more information from smell than you're consciously aware of. We did an ad-hoc test once when I told my wife that I could readily distinguish clothing from any of the kids/nieces/nephews/family if they'd touched it recently for a few minutes and it was clean to begin with. She didn't believe me, so she got clean diapers and tested me out. I batted 1000 - the only hesitancy was telling brother Todd from brother Dan but I got it eventually. I had previously noticed that I could sort the kids' laundry when they came over by just sticking my snozz in and inhaling - I didn't get a distinctive smell so much as it evoked a memory of the correct kid, I would immediately recall something with that child. She found she could do it too, which was funny to watch.

Anyways, people long ago discovered and investigated the intense association between emotion, memory and smell.

Which, of course, is why the gubmint decided to investigate that too. It turns out that there are scents that don't evoke sensations of odor. Your olfactory sense responds to it, nerves fire, memories happen, emotions change, but you don't smell it consciously.

There are actually "scents" with no odor that will affect your behavior. I know that money was put into a "neutral scent" project to see if you could incapacitate people with emotion or memory association by emitting an odorless smell (not sure how to describe it otherwise) into an area. I'm not sure where that went because I wasn't interested in it and wasn't anywhere near that project. A fast search didn't turn up much. But it's one of those oddball things your tax dollars go to. It probably didn't go anywhere. Probably.



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 06:14 AM
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reply to post by shimmeringsilver73
 


Fantastic thread! I really do hope you got an applause for this one
Thank you, what is applause exactly?


Smell (IMO) plays a bigger role than what we realize, and we will no doubt get even greater insight into its workings and the mechanism behind smell / hormones / and the hardwiring of it into our brains when future research is done.
That is my opinion as well, without our senses we would be nothing.
I cant wait till we learn more about these things, I have always thought that with the development of our current thinking we have lost other primitive senses/skills that we are still capable of using.


What has always confounded me is the instant memories that are triggered when I smell a certain scent. Often there would be an association in my mind with a smell and a person - and often this association makes no sense at all. As an example - I could walk into a room and catch whiff of some jasmine flowers, and immediately the memory of a certain individual would spring to mind (even though that individual does not associate in my mind with jasmine flowers). But it would be more than a mere memory - that scent would evoke what feels like a very real physical encounter with that human. Difficult to explain... Anyhow, I suppose this explains it somewhat:
Yeah I have always found that weird, it was very powerful when I lost a family member and smelt their perfume a few years later; I would argue it was a stronger sense then vision and hearing in that instance.
You explained it quite well.



Very interesting question that you posed. How would artificial scent introduced on such a massive scale influence the hardwired connection of smell to the brain? I am certain that the long-term effect can not be good, and that the type of brain-connections made will definitely change in structure and shape, perhaps even bringing about a small but definitive change in the way we think and conceptualize. S+F
It is a question that is really bugging me and I wish I knew the answer. All I know is that there is a great potential for it to have an effect.
The long term effects is even more interesting, as with most things we have only been doing it for a few decades which is nothing on the evolutionary timescale.

Thank you for you input!!



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by IgnorantSpecies
reply to post by ArrowsNV
 

Well the problem with chemicals like this is you probably wouldn’t notice any ill affect, seems like something where the problems manifest over a long time or induce other problems.
I would say that on a dosage level, there would certainly be enough usage for potential problems, let’s not forget people are spraying this in high levels in confined areas with no ventilation all the time.
Electronic cigarettes are interesting in the fact that I have seen people become more addicted to them than they ever did to real cigarettes. Maybe PG is an addictive substance; it would explain why people seem addicted to these deodorants.
I still think as with many other chemicals that much more extensive and long term testing should have been done before it was released to the public on such a large scale. When there is money to be made people will rush to make money without thinking of the consequences, and while some testing has been done there is potential for many long term side affects to develop.
It’s not this chemical in particular that brings me to say this but that we have seen it happen so many times where we use something and later find out through simple testing that it is highly dangerous and must be banned. Now that we have more advanced technology it makes no sense to me why we don’t test things to the highest levels.

Good to see you agree, smell is indeed powerful.


I may not notice the 'ill affect', but my doctors would and I've been tested extensively for the past month. Blood tests, Head CT, MRI, MRA, EEG, EKG, and a few ultrasounds just within the past 3 weeks. Doctors can't find anything that would suggest I have acquired something acquired over the years, and I have talked with them about this (PG and my E-cig).

I talked with my GP (who is and has been a close family friend since he started med school) and he says PG is completely non toxic.

As for addictive? Lol, the only way a substance can be addictive is if it has a discernible affect on the human brain; which PG has none


There has been plenty of long term testing on PG as well. I will dig up studies if you still don't believe me.

But if anything is toxic in deodorants it is all the other chemicals. PG is used in deodorant just to attract 'water' (sweat) into the deodorant stick. It is a hygroscopic chemical.

edit on 3/27/2012 by ArrowsNV because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/27/2012 by ArrowsNV because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 02:47 AM
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Originally posted by ArrowsNV

Originally posted by IgnorantSpecies
reply to post by ArrowsNV
 

Well the problem with chemicals like this is you probably wouldn’t notice any ill affect, seems like something where the problems manifest over a long time or induce other problems.
I would say that on a dosage level, there would certainly be enough usage for potential problems, let’s not forget people are spraying this in high levels in confined areas with no ventilation all the time.
Electronic cigarettes are interesting in the fact that I have seen people become more addicted to them than they ever did to real cigarettes. Maybe PG is an addictive substance; it would explain why people seem addicted to these deodorants.
I still think as with many other chemicals that much more extensive and long term testing should have been done before it was released to the public on such a large scale. When there is money to be made people will rush to make money without thinking of the consequences, and while some testing has been done there is potential for many long term side affects to develop.
It’s not this chemical in particular that brings me to say this but that we have seen it happen so many times where we use something and later find out through simple testing that it is highly dangerous and must be banned. Now that we have more advanced technology it makes no sense to me why we don’t test things to the highest levels.

Good to see you agree, smell is indeed powerful.


I may not notice the 'ill affect', but my doctors would and I've been tested extensively for the past month. Blood tests, Head CT, MRI, MRA, EEG, EKG, and a few ultrasounds just within the past 3 weeks. Doctors can't find anything that would suggest I have acquired something acquired over the years, and I have talked with them about this (PG and my E-cig).

I talked with my GP (who is and has been a close family friend since he started med school) and he says PG is completely non toxic.

As for addictive? Lol, the only way a substance can be addictive is if it has a discernible affect on the human brain; which PG has none


There has been plenty of long term testing on PG as well. I will dig up studies if you still don't believe me.

But if anything is toxic in deodorants it is all the other chemicals. PG is used in deodorant just to attract 'water' (sweat) into the deodorant stick. It is a hygroscopic chemical.

edit on 3/27/2012 by ArrowsNV because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/27/2012 by ArrowsNV because: (no reason given)
Well not always, part of the biggest concern is the long term effects possibly on a generational time scale.

I quit smoking cold turkey first time relatively easily after doing research on how addiction actually works.


Well anything can be addictive, for example smoking can have a lot to do with just hand movement.

I know there has been testing but not enough in my opinion, as I said it could be a generational thing.
With the amount of dangerous chemicals we are exposed to (thousands) one of them is bound to have some serious long term effects we don’t know about.
And we will pay the price.

Yeah I would be more worried about the accelerants.

Thanks for all your input by the way



posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 04:35 AM
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I've never heard of the Unilever brand either. I thought you might be talking about Gillette.
I can't say I agree about going au natural, B.O. is an offensive smell to my nose.
However It probably isn't healthy to use anti perspirants or deodorants, I imagine it traps the chemicals in the lymph nodes and adrenal glands.

As for the topic at hand regarding scent. Apart from close physical intimacy, I can't say as I get a whiff of somebody and note it as their deodorant. I would think it was cologne. I do have a strong sense of smell though. I find each family has its own distinct scent. It's in their home, clothes, hair, their cars, on their pets even, and it lingers in my home after they've left. I'm not saying its an unpleasant odor. It's just an odor of other people and in that sense I'm adverse to it. I cannot bear for anyone to slip on my jacket on or wrap my blanket around them because then I must wash the article to rid the smell. I don't like another persons coat hanging up next to mine.I have no idea why I am this way. I know it isn't normal.



posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 11:57 AM
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Originally posted by IgnorantSpecies
Well not always, part of the biggest concern is the long term effects possibly on a generational time scale.

I quit smoking cold turkey first time relatively easily after doing research on how addiction actually works.


Well anything can be addictive, for example smoking can have a lot to do with just hand movement.

I know there has been testing but not enough in my opinion, as I said it could be a generational thing.
With the amount of dangerous chemicals we are exposed to (thousands) one of them is bound to have some serious long term effects we don’t know about.
And we will pay the price.

Yeah I would be more worried about the accelerants.

Thanks for all your input by the way
Well if it IS generational then I could really care less, I don't have kids and I never plan on having any for a lot more reasons than just that.

I still maintain that PG is almost completely non-toxic in regular sized doses. Although I have not found any long term studies pertaining to affects on further generations, I have read ones that cover high dose long term exposure and they found no ill affect as long as the doses weren't retardedly high.

As for the addiction part, you'd still need some sort of affect (smoke, or some sort of feeling, etc) for it to be addictive. I'd be willing to put a lot of money on PG in deodorant not being addictive. I've used deodorant in the past but it's really not something I've ever felt the NEED to use constantly. And to be honest I don't really use it at all, not unless I'm going to a job interview or somewhere I can't be stinkin like sweaty armpit.

I also can't believe a lot of you have never heard of Unilever. I've known about them since I was like 7. Maybe it's because I thoroughly read every package before I use the product and their logo is usually on there somewhere... :/ OCD much?

edit on 3/28/2012 by ArrowsNV because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/28/2012 by ArrowsNV because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 28 2012 @ 09:35 PM
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Originally posted by ArrowsNV

Originally posted by IgnorantSpecies
Well not always, part of the biggest concern is the long term effects possibly on a generational time scale.

I quit smoking cold turkey first time relatively easily after doing research on how addiction actually works.


Well anything can be addictive, for example smoking can have a lot to do with just hand movement.

I know there has been testing but not enough in my opinion, as I said it could be a generational thing.
With the amount of dangerous chemicals we are exposed to (thousands) one of them is bound to have some serious long term effects we don’t know about.
And we will pay the price.

Yeah I would be more worried about the accelerants.

Thanks for all your input by the way
Well if it IS generational then I could really care less, I don't have kids and I never plan on having any for a lot more reasons than just that.

I still maintain that PG is almost completely non-toxic in regular sized doses. Although I have not found any long term studies pertaining to affects on further generations, I have read ones that cover high dose long term exposure and they found no ill affect as long as the doses weren't retardedly high.

As for the addiction part, you'd still need some sort of affect (smoke, or some sort of feeling, etc) for it to be addictive. I'd be willing to put a lot of money on PG in deodorant not being addictive. I've used deodorant in the past but it's really not something I've ever felt the NEED to use constantly. And to be honest I don't really use it at all, not unless I'm going to a job interview or somewhere I can't be stinkin like sweaty armpit.

I also can't believe a lot of you have never heard of Unilever. I've known about them since I was like 7. Maybe it's because I thoroughly read every package before I use the product and their logo is usually on there somewhere... :/ OCD much?

edit on 3/28/2012 by ArrowsNV because: (no reason given)

edit on 3/28/2012 by ArrowsNV because: (no reason given)
Well yeah, I could hardly give a crap about the future of our species either; but that doesn't mean I want corporations to be the ones to f it up.

Literally any substance regardless of its effects can be addictive, although I wasn't to serious when I stated that PG could be addictive. It was just a baseless idea, although I do not doubt that deodorant companies have or have tried to put addictive substances in their ingredients.

I heard about them a year or so ago, was amazed to see how much influence they have.

I stand by the statement that if people were to dig around unilever they would find a tonne of good conspiracy theories.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 05:44 PM
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I wouldn't be surprised to literal crapload of conspiracies at Unilever, I mean how could you not?

They make everything from Deodorant to soap, all the way to 'I Can't Believe It's Not Butter'...

They have their grubby mitts in everything, like most other multi-National megacorporations.

edit on 3/29/2012 by ArrowsNV because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 02:47 AM
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You might have a point. Masking natural odors might interfere with innate pheromonal functions. I have read articles where women say that they like the smell of their man's sweat after they work out, so it's obvious there is some mother nature at work.

Does the big company you are talking about rhyme with "Proctor and Gamble"?



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 06:34 PM
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Originally posted by AwakeinNM
You might have a point. Masking natural odors might interfere with innate pheromonal functions. I have read articles where women say that they like the smell of their man's sweat after they work out, so it's obvious there is some mother nature at work.

Does the big company you are talking about rhyme with "Proctor and Gamble"?
Yeah, its a scary thought when you realize it hey.
I am of the opinion it could have a bigger effect then we could imagine.

The company is Unilever.
But this could apply to any cheap chemical deodorants I guess.
Just that if more people are wearing the same one it could have an even bigger more damaging effect.
edit on 3-4-2012 by IgnorantSpecies because: (no reason given)



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