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James Cameron Now at Ocean's Deepest Point

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posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 03:17 PM
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Originally posted by Nyiah


We are watching history being made today. A single man has dove into the extreme depths of the Mariana Trench, and survived the descent unscathed. The samples he will bring back for study may yield answers to many questions about life & geology in the Deep, or they may bring about new questions (more likely a little of both!)

I feel truly lucky to have been able to park my behind online & follow Twitter & FB while he dove, I really did get to watch history unfold in realtime updates. Also, Cameron's tweet after hitting bottom seemed bizarre, a tweet from the Deep had me giggling & shaking my head in amusement, lol.

news.nationalgeographic. com
(visit the link for the full news article)


There is nothing really historic about Camerons dive to the Mariana Trench. The US Navy did it on January 23, 1960 in the bathyscaphhe Trieste. I'm not trying to take away from Cameron, but for everyone to be acting as if this is "history making" is a little out of proportion. To me it is more amazing that it was done in 1960 with the technology we had then. My question is, why did it take 52 years for us to go back? Kinda like the moon......




posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 03:23 PM
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Why isn't he doing stuff that he's supposed to do, like make movies?

Indoctrinate the rest of society for his Jewish masters in Hollywood, you know all that good stuff.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:00 PM
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reply to post by Nyiah
 


For me it would be amazing to hear the great Jacques Cousteau narrate the footage of this epic journey, anyone who hasn't heard of Jacques Cousteau, then it's a bit like not hearing Carl Sagan narrate mankinds first steps on Mars. Or perhaps I'm being a nostalgic old fart.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:02 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


HAHA. I love how Phage can practically type anything and still get 50+ stars just for giving his take on it.

OT: Looking forward to Avatar 2 anyway, Cameron said it would revolve around the oceans of Pandora



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:10 PM
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It's good to see that we're slowly starting to understand and explore our home more and more every year!



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:10 PM
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Now this is the stuff that should be reported and not that bullcrap circus regarding Zimmerman and Trayvon.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:40 PM
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I dont mean to take away from Mr.Camerons acheivment but I found this on wiki



Only four descents have ever been achieved. The first manned descent was by Trieste in 1960. This was followed by the unmanned ROVs Kaikō in 1995 and Nereus in 2009. These expeditions measured very similar depths of 10,902 to 10,916 meters. On March 25, 2012, filmmaker James Cameron reached the bottom of the trench with a depth on arrival of 35,756 feet (10,898 meters) in the Deepsea Challenger submersible


Note Camerons depth at 10,898 meters while previous expiditions (manned and unmanned) have reached deeper depths 10,902m and 10,916m respectivly.


So how is this a historic day if its already been done and at a deeper depth?



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:57 PM
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reply to post by Nyiah
 


Awesome, that's greater in distance than some commercial flights are from the surface.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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Originally posted by Talltexxxan
I dont mean to take away from Mr.Camerons acheivment but I found this on wiki



Only four descents have ever been achieved. The first manned descent was by Trieste in 1960. This was followed by the unmanned ROVs Kaikō in 1995 and Nereus in 2009. These expeditions measured very similar depths of 10,902 to 10,916 meters. On March 25, 2012, filmmaker James Cameron reached the bottom of the trench with a depth on arrival of 35,756 feet (10,898 meters) in the Deepsea Challenger submersible


Note Camerons depth at 10,898 meters while previous expiditions (manned and unmanned) have reached deeper depths 10,902m and 10,916m respectivly.



So how is this a historic day if its already been done and at a deeper depth?


Shhh, don't ruin it for everybody else. Everybody wants to believe this is so significant, because... well because James Cameron is doing it! Now if Cameron had paid for professionals in the field to go down instead there would not be half the interest.

Nope Cameron does it and people are even happy clappy enough to believe their own nonsense - that Cameron is doing it out of the goodness of his own heart. They set aside the fact that we all know that he is one of the most shameless self promoters in Hollywood, or the fact that off this publicity he will produce films and increase his celebrity potential, riches and carrer progress.

Ahh celebrity and good old 'kindly' rich men. Nothing like either of the two to get most people from the US to bend over and lose their critical thinking skills.

Sorry guys, somebody had to say it - you all had me reaching for the bucket.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by Talltexxxan
 

Those depths were attained by ROVs.
But yes Trieste did take two men to the bottom of the Challenger Deep in 1960.

edit on 3/26/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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Thanks for showing this, OP, I didn't know.

I have a newfound respect for Cameron.
edit on 26-3-2012 by TheLegend because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by freethinker123
 

No spirit of adventure, huh?
Too bad. Sort of an evolutionary throwback. It's been done. Why do it again...bettter?



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:11 PM
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Originally posted by Nicolas Flamel

Originally posted by Echtelion
How the hell could he do that cramped inside a 1,1 meter sphere? He did all this journey crouched!


He's been preparing himself physically and mentally for a long time for this dive. He studied yoga for example to comfortably sit in the sphere.

Wow, just wow.


Well, mentally this has to be an immense challenge. It's one thing to place oneself in a Yoga position for 5 hours -- it's another to be forced into that 1 meter sphere and have no options for 10 hours (round trip I assume). A few miles under the ocean and no backup.

Cameron is really doing GREAT THINGS with his life. It's kind of surreal that a filmmaker will become someone to make a film about.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:15 PM
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Some details of the dive.

As for life-forms, he said, "I didn't see a fish. ... I didn't find anything that looked alive to me, other than a few [shrimplike] amphipods in the water," he said from aboard the research vessel Mermaid Sapphire. (See pictures of giant amphipods.)

"I didn't feel like I got to a place where I could take interesting geology samples or found anything interesting biologically."

This may be, in part, because a hydraulic fluid leak convinced Cameron to end the mission after about three hours. Previous projections had him surveying and sampling Challenger Deep and its life-forms for as long as six hours.



Speaking last week, Scripps's Bartlett had emphasized that Monday's dive was only the beginning and could "represent a turning point in how we approach ocean science.

"I absolutely think that what you're seeing is the start of a program, not just one grand expedition."

news.nationalgeographic.com...

edit on 3/26/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by ConspiracySquid7
 


I wont dispute the figure you site but I would ask you to consider that if it is accurate, we would at least know all the large geographic features. Sonar has given us a pretty good look at the largest features under the water so claiming this to be the deepest is probably safe and from the looks of things its safe by a fair distance too.

I call this the earths recycling center. The oldest rocks on the planet can be found in its depths. Here they sub-duct under the New Guinea plate where they are melted into magma. The magma in turn is pushed up and out of volcanoes forming new land masses. Even Mother Nature recycles ! You go girl....



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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reply to post by Nyiah
 


This is what he is looking for:

Rev 9:11 And they had a king over them, which is the angel of the bottomless pit, whose name in the Hebrew tongue is Abaddon, but in the Greek tongue hath his name Apollyon.


And the beast WILL rise ..... but the saints of the Lord already have the victory over this wickedness.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 05:58 PM
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and we'll all be able to see this billionaire's contribution to mankind and oceanography in 1 years time at the local imax in 3d for $17.99.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 07:20 PM
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Wow....6.7 Miles under the waves



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by Nucleardiver
 


Yes your right that it's been done before in 1960, but that was two guys supporting each-other.

Doing it solo is still an historic achievement though, not to mention a very courageous achievement.

36,000 ft into the abyss on your own...i mean come-on..that takes a lot of stones, give the guy the credit he deserves.

We need our whole society to move from war industry to explore industry, i think Mr Cameron is helping to make that a possibility.

Cosmic..



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 07:46 PM
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Here's CNN's story, and the video of James "emerging".

CNN


Cant help but think he is faking this "emerging" scene. He never went anywhere.



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