Khukuri! But which one?

page: 1
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 10:26 AM
link   
I am going to be ordering a Khukuri from Himalayan Imports sometime soon but I'm not very sure which one to get.

If you don't already know what a khukuri is then allow me to introduce you...

From Wikipedia


The kukri (Devanagari: खुकुरी) (alternatively spelled khukri or khukuri) is a curved Nepalese Knife, similar to the machete, used as both a tool and as a weapon. It is a traditional weapon for Nepalese people, and also a weapon of choice/side arm for all Nepalese including those serving in different armies around the world. The cutting edge is inwardly curved in shape and is the icon of Nepal. It was, and in many cases still is, the basic and traditional utility knife of the Nepalese people. Very effective when used as a weapon, it is a symbolic weapon of the Nepalese Army, and of all Gurkha regiments throughout the world, signifying the courage and valor of the bearer in the battlefield.





Weaponry

The kukri is effective as both a chopping and a slashing weapon. In combat, it is basically used in two different styles: stabbing with the point, slashing or chopping with the edge. Because the blade bends towards the opponent, the user need not angle the wrist, which makes the kukri more comfortable as a stabbing weapon than other straight-bladed knives. Its heavy blade enables the user to inflict deep wounds and to cut through muscle and bone.

Utility

While most famed from use in the military, the kukri is most commonly used as a multipurpose tool, and is a very common agricultural and household implement in Nepal. Its use has varied from building, clearing, chopping firewood, and digging to cutting meat and vegetables, skinning animals, and opening tins.


I think I may have it narrowed down between three knives. I was hoping someone here on the weapons forum could help me decide... I live in deep southern Georgia. it is very humid here. Almost tropical.

The knives I believe I have it down to are as follows:

The Chiruwa Ang Khola



The 18 inch sirupati



Or The Gurkha WWII model



What do you guys think? Any and all help is appreciated.

All pictures are from the Himalayan Imports website. Himalayan Imports is the Best supplier of REAL Nepalese Khukuris in the world.




posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 10:35 AM
link   
Im no professional, but I would go with the one I liked best.

In the old days, back before the internet, you could go to a store and check out which one feels right.


CX

posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 10:38 AM
link   
I've used the Cold Steel Kukri Machete for a couple of years now, have added some tight rubber bike tubing on it for better grip. Does the job nicely.

www.coldsteel-uk.com...

CX.

Edit: Aplogies, forgot that you aren't looking for other options, i'll leave the advice to someone else who knows more about them. They look too nice to use as much as i do, at least with my Cold Steel one it takes a god beating and it's no loss if i mark it.
edit on 25/3/12 by CX because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 10:40 AM
link   
Can't really tell from a picture. The LAST thing you want to do is pick the prettiest one. You should look at what it's made of [grade &hardness of the steel] and what you're going to use it for. All that flash doesn't mean it's a good weapon.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 10:47 AM
link   
Seeing that the Gurka's saved my Grandad's life I would say go Gurkha



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 10:49 AM
link   
reply to post by CX
 


The Cold Steel and other Americanized Khukuris will not last as long as the Nepalese khuks. They are usually thin like an American machete whereas Nepalese khuks are usually a half inch thick. Do not be fooled by the beauty of the blade. They are made to last, and to be put through the toughest use on the planet. If one breaks ever the company will send you two for free.

They are made by the Nepalese Blacksmith caste known as the Kami. Kamis have been passing down the traditional way of making khukuris for more than four centuries. I think i'll go with them.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 10:51 AM
link   
First of all, order from Windless Steelcraft. Same exact blades, literally, but no import tax. You'll get it for about half the price.

After that, id personally go for the guhrka issue model. Its beenn field tested for 100 years. Best knife ever made, in my opinion.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 10:53 AM
link   
Another thing:brands like cold steel a kabar make great products, but they are not true kukris. They are machetes designed like a kukri.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 10:55 AM
link   
reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


Himalayan Imports the product company is based in the U.S. It was started by Bill Martino to economically help the Kamis in Nepal. There is no import tax (since it has already been imported) and $150 is an amazing price for what is possibly the best blades on the planet.
edit on 25-3-2012 by boot2theface because: Clarity



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 10:55 AM
link   
i have a 14 inch gurhka i bought from them earlier this year. I still have yet to legitimately use it, but it is of pretty good craftmanship, and not too much that you'll want to put it on a shelf. It is 520 truck steel that they use (ultra sturdy), so be conscientious of the weight.


www.thekhukurihouse.com...

i have this one, and a small 2.5" blade i carry with me everywhere. Sacred heart warrior, symbol of the knife.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:01 AM
link   

Originally posted by boot2theface
reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


Himalayan Imports the product company is based in the U.S. It was started by Bill Martino to economically help the Kamis in Nepal. There is no import tax (since it has already been imported) and $150 is an amazing price for what is possibly the best blades on the planet.
edit on 25-3-2012 by boot2theface because: Clarity

Fair enough, I was obviously thinking of another company. That said, windless steelcrafts will still beat that price by half, for what is the contracted blade of gurhkas today.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:16 AM
link   

Originally posted by DAVID64
Can't really tell from a picture. The LAST thing you want to do is pick the prettiest one. You should look at what it's made of [grade &hardness of the steel] and what you're going to use it for. All that flash doesn't mean it's a good weapon.



Look at the weight and dimensions of the handle. The custom grips on many khukuris are specific to a certain finger width &/or how you handle a grip.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 11:24 AM
link   
you should go into more detail. When I order one will i have to decide on a custom handle? What kind of handle should I use? Horn or Wood?



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 10:10 AM
link   
My advice to you, is never to buy a blade until you have held it in your hand, tested the keeness of its edge against your own palm, and the way it displaces its weight. I would say the same of any weildable object, be it a claymore, or a cricket bat.

Being comfortable with the way a tool fits your hand, and the point at which it balanced, is essential if you intend to use the object comfortably. For instance, I once thought that mordern erganomic hlits and grips on knives would be far more comfortable to grasp, and harder to drop than my old bone grip bowie knife. It turns out that I was wrong. Having handled various bladed objects over the years, I find that the most comfortable one for you is always a matter of preference, down to you.

But I do not think you should buy anything you cannot weigh in your hand first.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 10:57 AM
link   
reply to post by TrueBrit
 


I would agree with this, but i am unable to drive to phoenix az. lol. If I knew I could get the same craftsmanship closer to home I would. But I don't think it's possible



posted on Mar, 27 2012 @ 09:25 PM
link   
I vote for the middle one.
Those things all look like must haves though.
I don't like the shiney blades but like smike, I hope you have fun hackn zombies.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:24 AM
link   
I own and use the 20" Chiruwa and the 20" Sirupati. Both the Sirupati and Chiruwa have 14" blades. Also own a 15" Ang Khola with a 9 7/8" blade.
They are different animals.
The Sirupati is a bit thinner in profile, lighter and VERY FAST for a khukuri. If I remember correctly, it's geared for martial artists. However, like all khukuris, it is a formidable chopper.
The Chiruwa is heavier, and, overall, a stouter knife. Outstanding as a chopper, but, it will wear you out faster with that extra few ounces of extra weight. Believe me, it makes a difference if your doing a lot of chopping.

If your looking for a shorter knife, their Ang Khola model is built like a tank and takes pretty much everything one can dish out. I mention it, because, out of the three, the Ang Khola is the easiest one to tote around due to it's shorter overall length. It also has the thickest blade at just about 1/2".
edit on 29-3-2012 by Mike U. because: (no reason given)
edit on 29-3-2012 by Mike U. because: correcting measurement



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 08:19 AM
link   
reply to post by Mike U.
 


Thank you for your first hand account of using some of these. I'm getting closer to getting the sirupate I think. I'm not sure what length I need though.
I had heard that the steel that is used to make Nepalese khukuris are more prone to rust in more humid environments. Is this true? Is there certain ways to negate this? I've heard that a polished blade will help. It is VERY humid where I live.
Thanks for all of you guys responses.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 01:01 AM
link   
Yeah, they can be prone to rust if left uncared for. Just keep a light coat of oil on it, or let it form a patina.

About the steel: Himalayan Imports uses 5160 Straight Carbon Spring Steel. It's the same steel used to make the leaf springs on your car or truck. It has a well earned reputation for being tough, and, is used to make larger knives and even combat ready swords.

If you use your khukuri(s) a lot, they are gonna discolor from that use. That's kind of a given with Straight Carbon Steel. There's not enough Chromium in the steel to give it corrosion resistance.
5160 has .7-.9% Chromium.
You need >12% Chromium to get a more stainless steel. For example, 440 stainless has 18% Chromium.

Finally, the Sirupati is by far my favorite Khukuri. It does most everything very well.
Zombies don't stand a chance when your swingin' a Sirupati at their head.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 01:09 AM
link   
Does the blade metal go all the way to the bottom of the handle on all of these?
2nd





new topics

top topics



 
2
<<   2 >>

log in

join