It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Something I never see discussed here...

page: 1
7

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 24 2012 @ 08:03 AM
link   
...which should be.

The single most consistent element I've seen of any SHTF or Survivalist strategy, is a reliance on the natural, rural environment. Yet are many of you aware of the extent to which said environment is in the crapper at the moment?

Where I'm currently living, we don't get real summers any more. We get maybe 1-2 weeks of 35-45C temperatures, which cause bushfires, and then it rains for the entirety of the rest of the three month period. Winter is similarly insane. It can be as cold as you like, sure, but bone dry. Have fun growing vegetables outside in those sorts of conditions.

Have any of you thought about this? Are you planning to grow vegetables in doors, in controlled conditions? I've seen some really good setups on YouTube, and if you're willing to be McGyverish about it, (and that's part of the definition of Survivalism anyway, right?) they don't have to be that expensive at all.

This is something to keep in mind, though. With all of the chemtrails, deforestation, and other crap, post-TEOTWAWKI, the environment may not hold up as well as you think. I remember that guy who died in Scotland recently, which was posted here, and one of the things that was said there was that if the environment was still in the shape it was back in the old days, he might have made it. They say that the reason why the Kalahari Bushmen can't live the way they used to any more, is because upwards of 65% of the ecosystem that they used to rely on to survive, is gone now.

The woods ain't what they used to be. Don't go out into them thinking that the forage, by itself, is going to be as good as it was even 30-50 years ago. It won't be. I took a Permaculture design course last year, and it was probably the best $2k I've ever spent. Taught me a lot about keeping a stable water supply going, if nothing else. The guy who teaches it, is running a desert rehydration program in Jordan; that's how good he is.

The point is that when TSHTF, you're going to need infrastructure. A stash on its' own won't cut it. There is no telling how long such a scenario might last, so you're going to need to know how to fix the land up, in order to keep it producing for you.




posted on Mar, 24 2012 @ 08:29 AM
link   
Its funny you should mention that. Here in Australia, in western Sydney, they are building what will apparently be the biggest greenhouse in the southern hemisphere for the sole purpose of growing Tomatoes. Also, a lot of good farm land here in Oz is being bought up by other countries to supply food to their respective countries. As it would seem, 'us' down under could very well end up being China's worker ants



posted on Mar, 24 2012 @ 08:38 AM
link   
I guess it depends on where you live. Where I live, the winters are definitely warming up, snow starting later, disappearing earlier, so my growing season has been getting longer. We get plenty of rain in the summer and if not, I have a small pond and there are small streams through the woods. There is plenty of wildlife - deer, moose, bear, and assorted smaller critters - though I don't know how long it would last if all the city people came out here hunting to survive. There is all kind of wild stuff that can be harvested and eaten from burdock root and fiddleheads in the spring to wild nuts, plus all sorts of greens. I am enlarging my garden and planting more things that keep returning like strawberries, fruit trees, jerusalem artichokes, etc. I have acres of land to harvest for firewood for heating in the winter. So, whether you can live off the land depends on what location you have chosen to live in.



posted on Mar, 24 2012 @ 08:44 AM
link   
here we METIS are partially decendant from bark eaters
the reason for this is that trees are hardy plentiful avaliable and even nutritious

pine inner bark and catkins tasty and very caloric
white oak acorns make dark flour and can be eaten roasted too if the tannins are first leeched out
beach nuts as is or as oil
Maple and birch sugar

the leaves of maple, birch, willow... are medicinal and have food value also

there is more too...the researching is very interesting I think

I would recommend familiarizing your selves with the history of the local abouriginals and what they did in hard times...cause they more then likely have seen tough conditions often
edit on 24-3-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)


PS
it is unseasonably warm for this early in the year in Ontario Canada
the beach have yet to drop thier leaves from last year which they do not do until AFTER the last snow fall
which means will be getting it late this spring...
this will be as in the OP..tough on the flora and fauna as it will just be getting started for the season most likely
edit on 24-3-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)


Edible Pine Tree Bark and Birch Bark
www.youtube.com...


Have You Had Your Daily Quota of Bark or Buds?
My Grandpere taught us early that whatever other mammals eat, is probably safe for humans to eat, at least when it came to the bark and the buds of plants. For instance, both the bark and the bud of aspen trees can be eaten raw or cooked. Now, they taste better when boiled into a jello-like gruel, but they can sustain life.
Consider, that the buds of the following trees are edible:
Basswood
Popular
Maple
Likewise, the shoots of the following trees are edible:
Spruce
Tamarack
Then, there is the highly edible bark of the:
Willow
Alder
Hemlock
Basswood
Birch
Some pines (Scotch pine of northern Europe and Asia, also lodge-pole or shore pines of North America)
The inner bark is edible from virtually all trees and can be eaten raw or cooked. A long time ago during famines, people even made bread from flour gotten from the bark of trees.

The most important thing to know about eating bark is that it's the thin, green, outer bark and the white, inside bark that are edible. Stay away from bark that is brown, as it contains too much tannin. Another tip is that with pines, the park is scraped away and the inner-most bark stripped from the trunk can be eaten fresh, dried, or cooked. Most desirable bark as a food source in terms of taste is in the spring when bark is newly formed.

Lastly, do not forget that the leaves of certain trees can be eaten when boiled, some of these are:

Mountain sorrel
Willows (young, not mature)
Fireweed
jerileewei.hubpages.com...
edit on 24-3-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-3-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-3-2012 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 24 2012 @ 09:02 PM
link   
This is why pastoralism (herding) beats agriculture (farming)

People often assume that our ancestors were originally herdsmen who settled down to farm. The opposite appears to be the case, based on evidence. But to make a short story long, our ancestors learned that living off of grazing animals will carry you through a multi-year drought or flood spell.

If a drought lasts less than a year, your herd can quickly recover; you may lose a couple of animals, and have to kill some to feed yourself; but you can rebuild the herd later, when the climate gets better.

If a drought goes on for several years, your herd may dwindle down to zero, but probably by then you will have migrated to "greener pastures" where the gettin' is easy.

For a homesteader, chickens and pigs are great examples. While we usually feed chickens on grain, the fact is, they're happiest eating bugs and grubs. Likewise pigs can live on treebark, and will eventually fell trees that are in their grazing pen---they 'ring' the tree by eating the bark off in a circle; when it falls over, they will root around and chew the roots.

And you can eat a few of the pigs and chickens. If you depend on gardening, you are tied to one spot, and are wiped out unless you have multiple years of produce stored.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 05:44 PM
link   
very good point OP. i think alot of focus on survivalism is on guns and having a year of food ready. both important, however equally important and not focused on is farming.

if people dropped half as much time/$$$ on farming as other stuff it'd be a much more balanced plan.
where i'm at in hawaii, even four acres can be insanely productive. with 100+ inches of rain a year people with catchment don't have to worry about fresh water. growing season is year round, wild pigs are a big tasty problem.

i can survive in this enviorment alot easier than people who have to deal with winter... don't know how i would do it to be honest.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 08:27 PM
link   

Originally posted by Nephlim

if people dropped half as much time/$$$ on farming as other stuff it'd be a much more balanced plan.


In my opinion, Nephilim, that's the difference between survivalists and "preppers"

preparation is more than just buying things. REAL preparation involves learning, not buying things.



posted on Mar, 25 2012 @ 08:42 PM
link   

Originally posted by dr_strangecraft

This is why pastoralism (herding) beats agriculture (farming)

People often assume that our ancestors were originally herdsmen who settled down to farm. The opposite appears to be the case, based on evidence. But to make a short story long, our ancestors learned that living off of grazing animals will carry you through a multi-year drought or flood spell.

If a drought lasts less than a year, your herd can quickly recover; you may lose a couple of animals, and have to kill some to feed yourself; but you can rebuild the herd later, when the climate gets better.

If a drought goes on for several years, your herd may dwindle down to zero, but probably by then you will have migrated to "greener pastures" where the gettin' is easy.

For a homesteader, chickens and pigs are great examples. While we usually feed chickens on grain, the fact is, they're happiest eating bugs and grubs. Likewise pigs can live on treebark, and will eventually fell trees that are in their grazing pen---they 'ring' the tree by eating the bark off in a circle; when it falls over, they will root around and chew the roots.

And you can eat a few of the pigs and chickens. If you depend on gardening, you are tied to one spot, and are wiped out unless you have multiple years of produce stored.


An excellent, well thought out post. Starred ! I'd always read that we were farmers first and then domesticated animals came later, but this makes much more sense, to me, anyway.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 01:46 AM
link   
reply to post by petrus4
 


Why aren't more survivalists environmentalists? The two movements should go together. The whole political spectrum nonsense has done more harm than good in the world. It was relevant during the French Revolution but it will not save us from a world in which the environment is "in the cr*pper" as you say.



posted on Mar, 26 2012 @ 03:07 AM
link   
reply to post by petrus4
 


I had this dream once, the entire world was a desert scorched land, and everyone was living underground.

Your post reminded me of it


I suppose one can live underground and plant underground even, its probably the safest place to be in as long as you're not under some volcanic areas I assume. One might need some sunlight bulbs tho to grow all the food.

Good post.



new topics

top topics



 
7

log in

join