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I Request Some Help With Math Please

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posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 11:50 AM
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The reason behind this is I am writing a story in which a superhero has the ability to create any object he wishes out of thin air by rearranging the molecules, with the restrictions that, it can not be electronic, it can not have moving parts, and it can not be more than five pounds of material. I'm not all that great with algebra.

So, if he were to create a solid five pound block of iron, how much area would it be able to it it were one inch thick and one half inch thick?

And what is the proper formula for finding that out with other materials?

And thank you.




posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 11:59 AM
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Use the volume formulas. Length (times) width (times) height
but I think you might have to add/multiply in the atomic weight of the element in question

Really, just google it and I'm sure the answer will come.

Did you get this idea from green lantern?



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by EvilSadamClone
 



density Iron = 7.86g/cm3 Volume Iron = x (in cm3)

7.86 g/cm3 times X = 2,267.96185 grams (5lbs)

then X = 2,267.96cm3/7.86

x = 288.54452cm3

centimeters cubed...
288.5cm3 times 0.061 = volume in in3 = 17.5in3
or 17.5 inches cubed

so with 2 sides as one inch each you get 1.5 feet as the third length.
at 1/2 in and 1 inch sides you get a 3 foot long object

water is 1g/cm3 so 5lbs or 2,268 grams of water takes up 2,268cm3 or 138 in3


you are going to need volume formulas for other shapes like cones, pyramids, spheres...


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posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 12:03 PM
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Just use Wolfram Alpha to provide you with the molecular weights and Google the formulas


I think you will have a very small block of iron if it is an inch thick!
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posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by Skada
 


No. From an old game that had the power of Matter Rearrangement.



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by EvilSadamClone
 


very neat.
You might want to give the hero at least a basic background in chemistry or some sort of geological background.
Maybe even a study in alloys.
BTW you might wanna look into graphene. Strongest substance known to man so far.
And other metallic alloys.

good luck.



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by Dustytoad
 


here's a conversion chart and an elemental densities chart:
Conversion Chart
density chart of pure elements in grams per centimeter cubed you can download this chart so that you can change what it displays as well including the name of the elements and many of their properties like conductivity and boiling points and other stuff


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posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 12:28 PM
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I think I wasn't clear enough. Let me try this; the iron can be smelted down into a single sheet. How much area would that sheet cover if it were one half inch thick or one quarter of an inch thick? I think it can be much more area than three feet.

I have been looking for the right formulas but I haven't found them them, which is why I asked here.



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by EvilSadamClone
 


Nope, if it was only 5lbs worth, I think the numbers above are correct.
Just picture a 10lb weight, flattened. Not going to be a lot of area, is it?
Now, picture a 5lb weight, flattened.

I'd think that this "superpower" isn't really all that super...if he can't do moving parts, etc.
So, he can make a 5lb sword? I have swords that weigh more, that would break it (and a gun that would go through him (and that 1/2 inch thick shield)...

Just trying to foster a bit more thought into this.... You may want to go more than 10lbs here. Really, it shouldn't be weight dependent, but amount of matter dependent (or area effect). As another mentioned, this is pretty similar to what Green Lantern does, so expect that comparison.



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 03:08 PM
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reply to post by EvilSadamClone
 

Why bother, put your superhero into metalized enviroment so he could make all sorts of metals, lol



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 04:06 PM
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No. From an old game that had the power of Matter Rearrangement.


Heroes Unlimited?

I used one of these in a Rifts campaign once...except his powers were more about manipulating his own density (was named "Phazer")...(actually, I was the GM, and one of my players came up with it, I just helped him finesse it out)... Got a pretty cool comic book style drawing of him around here somewhere...




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