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GIANT SPIDER IDENTIFICATION REQUIRED - HELP!! PICS BELOW

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posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:09 AM
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reply to post by Danbones
 


I always thought it was either their teeth are to soft to puncture our skin or their teeth are not long enough.
Not sure, really but curious as to what the real reason is.




posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by Skewed
 


rubber teeth?
nope
thats the bulldogs on the hard rock candy mountain

i have never been gummed by a DLL...

But you might be right BRB....google time



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:13 AM
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You should identify it as the damn thing that's on the bottom of you shoe



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:13 AM
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Originally posted by Danbones

it just can't wrap its lips around man flesh becasue its mouth is too small

which could mean there is a god.


I am sure there is a joke there.........




posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:13 AM
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Are Daddy Long Legs poisonous?


Myth: Daddy Long Legs are the most poisonous spider in the world.

Daddy Long Legs are not the most poisonous spider as you’ll often hear people say. We’ll just ignore the fact that there’s a big difference between “poisonous” and “venomous”, which makes the previous sentence even more ridiculous and assume people mean “venomous” when they make that statement. We’ll also ignore the fact that one of the two arachnids commonly called “Daddy Long Legs” isn’t even a spider.

“Daddy Long Legs” is the name of two distinct kinds of creatures, an arachnid and spider of the family Pholcidae and an arachnid in the family Phalangiidae, namely Opiliones (which is the one that’s not a spider). The former of which does have venom, but there is no scientific basis of the idea that it is particularly harmful to humans, and the latter of which has no venom glands or other way to chemically subdue potential food sources or things that threaten it.

In the case of the pholcid spiders, which do have venom, they have very similar fang structure and size to brown-recluse spiders, who are perfectly capable of having their fangs penetrate deep enough to do serious damage to humans. However, before 2004, there were no known records of bites from the pholcid spiders to humans. This may be because, when they do bite, nothing particularly bad happens. Or, it may be because they simply aren’t very aggressive or because their muscles used with their fangs aren’t as strong as the very similarly fanged brown-recluse spider. In any event, the myth that their fangs are two small to penetrate sufficiently to deliver venom, simply isn’t true and to date, there is no scientific basis for the notion that their venom is particularly harmful to humans.

Case in point, in 2004, the show Myth Busters had one of their people attempt to get bit by one of these spiders and supposedly they were successful. Rather than die from the bite, the person bitten reported simply feeling a very brief and mild burning sensation which disappeared quickly. Further, research done by Alan Van Dyke has shown that the pholcid venom doesn’t even negatively affect insects all that much either, so is considered to be very mild.

So the two myths surrounding that one, that they can’t bite humans due to mouth/fang size and that their venom is particularly harmful, simply aren’t true.

For the other variety of “daddy long legs”, opilionids, they actually have no venom, as stated before, nor a method to deliver that venom, like fangs, even if they possessed the venom in the first place. They live off decomposing vegetation and animal matter, primarily. They also aren’t actually spiders, which would of course make the statement “most poisonous spider” even more nonsensical.






posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:15 AM
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My mom identified that spider, she said " I believe that species is known as the "snaggle-tooth wiener spider They like to bite guys on the junk."



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:15 AM
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Originally posted by nonnez
We have them here in the N.W. U.S. as well:

Tegenaria duellica . . . better known as "The Giant House Spider".

Giant House Spider

Mostly harmless, except to your nerves.





How the hell is that thing harmless???? I have just had a coronary clicking on the link......

To the OP, im totally with you mate. Full NCB kit before i would go anywhere near that flat again.



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by Skewed
 



Question: Is a Daddy Longlegs Venomous, and Can It Bite Humans?
I've heard that daddy longlegs are extremely venomous, but they can't bite humans because their fangs are too short to penetrate the skin. Is that true?

Answer:
First of all, there are actually three kinds of critters called daddy longlegs. The common name daddy longlegs is most often used to describe Opiliones, aka harvestmen. Opiliones are arachnids, but not spiders. They have no venom glands at all, and are absolutely not venomous. The nickname daddy longlegs may also refer to a crane fly, which is a true fly and a member of the order Diptera. Crane flies do not pose a threat, either.

Sometimes, the name daddy longlegs is used for another group of arachnids, the spiders of the family Pholcidae. These spiders are also called cellar spiders.

Cellar spiders do have venom glands. However, there is no scientific evidence whatsoever to confirm that their venom can harm a human being. Not a single documented case exists of a person being bitten by one and having an adverse reaction.

Pholcid spiders do have short fangs, but not any shorter than other spiders that have been known to bite humans. The cellar spider's fangs are similar in structure to those of a brown recluse spider, which we know can and does bite humans. Again, there is no evidence or proof to the claim that their fangs are too short to bite a person.

In fact, the show Mythbusters tackled this daddy longlegs legend back in 2004. Host Adam Savage subjected himself to a cellar spider bite, proving that the daddy longlegs spider is indeed capable of breaking human skin. The results? Savage reported nothing more than a very mild, short-lived burning sensation. Analysis of the daddy longlegs' venom revealed it's nowhere near as potent as venom from a black widow spider.

So, you really don't need to worry about daddy longlegs, of any variety.

insects.about.com...
There na na nan na na na!
we are both wrong
So there


no wonder My mother the DrVM never told me to worry about them little celler dwellers



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by Danbones
 


i have heard this too



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:19 AM
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reply to post by RestlessNRG
 


Here in the NW of America that looks like a Hobo spider.

By the fangs having poison glands at the end. We only have one poisonous spider on the Oregon Coast and it is the Hobo.

Once bitten after about one to two weeks the bite site begins to enlarge and the flesh will die. It requires aggressive cleaning and antibiotics to care for and usually leaves a nice size hole in the body.

It is easy to spot these guys as they live in corners and build a funnel shaped web.
www.hobospider.org...
edit on 23-3-2012 by ACTS 2:38 because: web





Tegenaria gigantea, the giant or larger house spider (pictured above), is a larger cousin of the hobo spider, T. agrestis, and is in fact the largest member of the genus Tegenaria. Like the hobo and domestic house spiders, gigantea was introduced into North America from Europe; It probably was first introduced on Vancouver Island, B.C. in the mid-1920s, and was likely present in the Seattle area by 1960. The giant house spider has gained a reputation and received much publicity over the past several years as a beneficial spider which keeps hobo spiders out of houses; this reputation seems well founded: In much of western Europe (England, France, Germany and Wales) where agrestis lives in fields , virtually divorced from the human population, gigantea is commonly found inside houses and other buildings. In some areas of the northwestern United States (parts of the Seattle, WA area for example), the establishment of gigantea populations appears to correlate with a reduction in the numbers of hobo spiders.

edit on 23-3-2012 by ACTS 2:38 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:19 AM
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Originally posted by maryhinge
reply to post by Danbones
 


i have heard this too

*sigh*
I had to revise my ignorance in the face of the facts


now as to whether daddy long legs can stand up to the bite of a human
well....



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:21 AM
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Originally posted by RestlessNRG
reply to post by Skewed
 


daddy long legs in england i think you guys call a crane fly!


And In the states we call the crane fly a mosquito hawk



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:22 AM
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reply to post by Danbones
 


Very well.

I just fulfilled my daily quest of learning something new everyday.
Almost in record time even.



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:25 AM
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I'd run screaming like a little girl if I saw one.




posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:34 AM
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These monsters are in the uk!!? I seriously think i would have heart failure or a siezure if one of those was anywhere near me
I have tried everything to get over my arachnophobia but nothing works
even a small spider can send me screaming like a 6 year old girl


I guess we can expect more of these foreign invaders as the climate continues to warm... I will have to move further north maybe.



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 10:35 AM
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we have these in scotland too.not talking bs but i had one called otto a few years back.he definately lived at least 3 years.would come down and drink from wet tissue.(research told me that when spiders turn greyish or beigeish they are dehydrated)he was never seen in winter so presume he hybernated.also not being a web based spider he left no mess.to be honest he became an unofficial pet,like a stray cat that wont quite let you stroke it.we moved house,sadly otto did not pack himself in a box.he grew every year to the extent that on first sighting every spring he was hard to believe.honestly not lying when i say he was at least 5--6 inches from toe to toe.that is pretty big for europe.have had similar species spiders in new home,but they didnt have the street smarts....otto was a top of wall walker..others i have seen run on the floor.occassionally find one that has taken to the floor and fell victim to 3 cats.however cats dont like the taste.usually we find a wet sodden half chewed body.they must taste bitter.



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 11:32 AM
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!!!!!!! i just peed a little.

i could be wrong, but i'm pretty sure that's the Devil.



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 02:06 PM
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I'm terrified of spiders, but somewhat superstitious about killing them.

When a man fyndeth a spyder upon his gowne it is a synge to be that daye ryght happye.



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 02:57 PM
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I have these in my house, I live in Northwest United States and we call them HOBO spiders and they bite. www.tandjenterprises.com...

Spray! Spray! Spray!


edit on 23-3-2012 by Christarella because: ETA: After looking again at your pic I noticed that there doesn't seem to be any hair on the legs like there is on the ones that roam around my area. Gosh they are creepy.



posted on Mar, 23 2012 @ 03:58 PM
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reply to post by RestlessNRG
 


The spider just looks like a normal house spider, once the weather warms up they'll start to go back outdoors, they just don't like the cold so much. I never kill spiders, they eat flies after all, and flies carry germs...so they represent a lesser of two evils.

I would strongly suggest, based on those pictures, that either you or your tenant, clean the bathroom as a matter of some urgency. It's filthy!



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