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How did they get there in the first place?

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posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 01:10 PM
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Originally posted by AnIntellectualRedneck
I'm supposed to believe that a bunch of Stone Age people got thousands of miles out into the middle of the Pacific on glorified canoes? Seriously? Specifically, I am thinking about Easter Island and Hawaii.

That's the way the current flows. In the Pacific, if you get on a boat just above the Equator, you get pulled to Central America. Follow the current along the coastline down below the Equator, and you get pulled to the various islands in the South Pacific, including the Galapagos and Easter Island. Spend a lot of time on boats, which the Pacific Islanders did (and not glorified canoes but small and sturdy ocean craft), and some people will inevitably get dragged that route by accident.




posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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If I'm not mistaken (and I might be, was a looong time ago), I believe a fellow named "Thor Heyerdahl" made that journey several decades ago...(something like late 40's or early 50's) ancient, native style vessels...wrote a book about it called "Kon Tiki".



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 01:20 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


Drifting is always a possibility; Japanese boats drifted to the American Northwest in historic times and a disable boat, off the American coast, drifted almost all the way to Europe.

The current along the SA west coast takes you north. When Thor Hyerdahl did his thing he had to be towed out fifty miles to avoid the Humboldt current - if not he would have been swept north



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
The current along the SA west coast takes you north. When Thor Hyerdahl did his thing he had to be towed out fifty miles to avoid the Humboldt current - if not he would have been swept north

The Peru Coastal Current takes you north, but the Panama Current takes you south toward the Galapagos. If he started farther north, he wouldn't have had that problem.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 01:46 PM
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reply to post by Blue Shift
 


Ah but he wanted to start from the center, so he fudged a bit - he's a hero of mine. His book Aku Aku, was the one that launched me on an archaeological career. If you ever have the chance visit his museum in Oslo!



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by CaptainNemo
 


reply to post by Phage
 


Guns germs and steel is one of the best books i have ever read, although it gets a little redundant and boring after a while. I mean, how many times can you expertly prove your point/beat a dead horse haha.

Also would recomend the book kontiki. Ancient man was very adept at travelling either on land or sea!



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:15 PM
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I believe Ancient people, mastered the Oceans, and many other inventions and ideas, long before there was ever a Christopher Columbus or Western society, there was supposedly maps of Antartica's full coast line, without the Ice, just the land mapped, and put in the great library at Alexanderia, before it was all messed up by the western crusades, a way for the Church to control our thinking and what we understood as our modern world, in a sense the Church through Humanity back into the Stone age, by limiting what we could think, design, make, invent, etc..... History was created and then wiped clean, to make way for the Church to control the masses



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 02:24 PM
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reply to post by Glassbender777
 


Could be, if there is a strong belief in something in combination with power and as we know, the victor writes history (which is often not the truth).
Sad stuff.



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 04:38 PM
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reply to post by Glassbender777
 


Well no no maps of Antarctica's coast (I believe you are referring to Admiral Piri Reis chart) which was from Instanbul and not Alexandria

Yep humans were floating around, best example - the Indonesian voyage and colonization of Madascasgar



posted on Mar, 29 2012 @ 10:46 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune


Yep humans were floating around, best example - the Indonesian voyage and colonization of Madascasgar


I think some people tend to forget that "modern" is not necessarily better.

Take a bunch of city dwellers and give them all the latest gadgets..........and chuck them in a remote Amazonian jungle..........who'd survive better the primitive " uncivilised" cut off tribes of the Amazon basin with their primitive tools.......or those city folks!

edit on 29-3-2012 by Logical one because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 01:25 AM
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Originally posted by Logical one

Originally posted by Hanslune


Yep humans were floating around, best example - the Indonesian voyage and colonization of Madascasgar


I think some people tend to forget that "modern" is not necessarily better.

Take a bunch of city dwellers and give them all the latest gadgets..........and chuck them in a remote Amazonian jungle..........who'd survive better the primitive " uncivilised" cut off tribes of the Amazon basin with their primitive tools.......or those city folks!

edit on 29-3-2012 by Logical one because: (no reason given)


The same happens if you take an ancient fisherman and put him into an ancient mountain herder tribe, or a desert dweller into a tropical forest - its the specific environment not some much the time frame. Frenchmen did well in the American and Canadian west because many of them came from places barely more 'civilized' than the native american cultures they worked with.

After just a generations Bedu would look down on city arabs - because they couldn't survive or work in the desert. In my day the Bedu called the educated city Arabs, ACCA, airconditiioned city arabs - and worthless for desert work of any kind



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 01:34 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune

The same happens if you take an ancient fisherman and put him into an ancient mountain herder tribe, or a desert dweller into a tropical forest - its the specific environment not some much the time frame.


I think that comment has some merit, although I STILL think that the ancient fisherman could adapt his survival skills on a mountain far better than city dwellers, largely because both environments require understanding nature and weather conditions and the need to adapt to different conditions to survive.......... most city dwellers don't.



posted on Mar, 30 2012 @ 09:44 PM
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Originally posted by Xcathdra

Originally posted by Flavian
The port theory though is totally out there though and doesn't have too much behind it in the way of credibility (not totally dismissing but certainly there are other possibilities). As to sea fossils in the Andes, well at one point they were under the sea so that makes sense (sames as Himalayas). My bit of the world used to be tropical reef - mad when you think how bloody cold it is these days!


Actually there is some evidence that may support the theory. In Lake Titicaca there are fresh water seahorses. There are no known locations aside from the lake where the seahorse has been located. In order for the seahorse to survive it would need to evolve and adapt.

In fact, there's not been one found there in Titicaca either.
The only specimen that has ever existed is a dried one found by Arthur Posnanski, the same guy who claimed the place was 14,000 years old. No living seahorse has ever been even seen in Titicaca.

Doesn't mean there's not one there, but let's not get all flustered here,.


Harte



posted on Mar, 31 2012 @ 02:10 AM
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Originally posted by Harte
The only specimen that has ever existed is a dried one found by Arthur Posnanski, the same guy who claimed the place was 14,000 years old. No living seahorse has ever been even seen in Titicaca.

Doesn't mean there's not one there, but let's not get all flustered here,.


Harte


Hadn't heard of the shrimp claim before - interesting.

Hey Posnanski actually claimed it was built in 15,0000 BC based on 'obliqueness of the ecliptic', if you are ever bored take a look at that piece of work.



posted on Mar, 31 2012 @ 07:41 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
reply to post by Blue Shift
 


Drifting is always a possibility; Japanese boats drifted to the American Northwest in historic times and a disable boat, off the American coast, drifted almost all the way to Europe.

The current along the SA west coast takes you north. When Thor Hyerdahl did his thing he had to be towed out fifty miles to avoid the Humboldt current - if not he would have been swept north

Hi Hans,
This might interest you,
m.yahoo.com... s, if you haven't seen it already.
Also did you give a link to a report of Japanese drifts to the west coast of NA , in some other thread?. I got the pdf from somewhere in the last couple weeks but can't find the source.
It's fascinating



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 01:52 PM
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Interesting question, and the answers provided are certainly food for thought. I didn't know about the ocean currents running past these islands, for example.
edit on 5-4-2012 by therealdemoboy because: example



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 


Yes I did it dealt with a Japanese ship that arrived on the Pacific North East, one of the crew survived and later became an interpreter



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 12:24 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
reply to post by punkinworks10
 


Yes I did it dealt with a Japanese ship that arrived on the Pacific North East, one of the crew survived and later became an interpreter

Speaking of which:


U.S. Coast Guard scuttles Japanese tsunami ship

The Ryou-Un Maru, carrying up to 2,100 gallons of diesel fuel, was about 170 nautical miles southwest of the Alaskan town of Sitka and had been drifting toward busy navigational lanes used by cargo vessels plying the waters of the Great Circle route between North America and Asia, Wadlow said.


Read the article

Harte



posted on Apr, 6 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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IMO I think the anicent people were far more advancd then we give them credit for. All we see are stones left behind maybe other things are gone like dust in the wind because,it was so long ago that they were here I mean things do bio degrade away. Maybe we are just looking at the stuff left over that did make it thourgh the age of time. They very well could have had better things to travel with.



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