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NASA USAOs: Alien Craft? NOT Ice Crystals!

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posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 09:39 PM
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By USAO I mean Unidentified Space Anomalous Objects as videotaped by shuttle astronauts and shuttle-mounted videocameras.

NOTE: I should have been more specific with the title. Not all of the photos are of USAOs but some people are treating as if they were. All you need is one photo to prove that it isn't an ice crystals and I've provided 4. The others are explained. Those 4 is the evidence against ice crystals.

Since manned (and womanned!) space exploration began anomalous objects have been videotaped. TPTB want to convince us that these anomalous objects can be explained prosaicly as ice crystals, shuttle debris, etc. I don't know how many of you have seen various NASA documentaries that have shown what ice crystals look like and how they behave and these taped objects do not look like nor behave like ice crystals.

But I'll tell you this, no matter how many times those explanations are offered, whether by NASA spokepeople, astronauts, or our James Oberg I refuse them because most of what we see in the various missions videos are not ice crystals. They can't be ice crystals 'cause these things that we call space UFOs are orderly, not haphazard as ice crystals behave. Plus a lot of other points that can be offered against the ice crystals explanation.

So to cut to the chase I took another look at LunaCognita's (Cary Martynuik) video that has close to 2 million views! It has been used as a source by ATS Aliens and UFOs members. However, I did a search and could not find that screen captures of the anomalous objects that are seen in the video have been presented as a thread and that is what I am doing.

I selected 5 of the objects although I'm including 11 photos. The 5 do show unusual objects and the other 6 show other objects. In the case of #5 (a & b) something weird happens; when the white "orb" appears on the left, top, side and you watch it all of a sudden you see something "pass by". Upon closer inspection, if you can freeze it, what appears (see 2nd photo) looks like a reversed image(s) of MIR! It's something you got to videotape as I did and play the tape in slow motion and frame-by-fram.

#8 (a & b) and #9 may not be considered alien craft as #8 could be an internal reflection although since I can't prove it isn't it has to be a possibility, and #9 could be shuttle debris although one wonders if such a piece of whatever wouldn't affect the stability and it's transparent! It could also be from MIR or a spent ...

#4 has been seen a ton of times but I noticed that when the "orb" glides down, in the distance one can see a once-blinking light: ON/OFF.

Here are the images with the approximate times they appear.
"NASA's Alien Anomalies caught on film - A compilation of stunning UFO footage from NASA's archives"
(Please embed this video for me, I get a Malformed URL ID message, as have others.)
www.youtube.com...

00:25
1 -


01:35
2 -


02:03
3 -


02:16
4 -


02:57
5 -


03:10
6 -


03:14
7 -


03:28
8 -


03:35
9 -


05:22
10 -


11 -

edit on 20-3-2012 by The Shrike because: To add comment.




posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by The Shrike
 

Here you go. I think this one has been posted before but just helping out.




posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:17 PM
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From 9/19/2006
www.msnbc.msn.com...


This photo, with an inset closeup view, shows an object floating away from the shuttle Atlantis. Shuttle program manager Wayne Hale said this particular object appeared to be "just a plastic bag," most likely from the shuttle's open payload bay.


When did NASA change it to an unidentified object?



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:20 PM
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I've seen some of that footage before. Very interesting & makes you wonder what's out there and if/when they will make themselves more known.
F & S



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:21 PM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 

Further analysis showed that the odd appearance was due to a long exposure time. The debris photographed on STS-115 seems to be some sort of clip.



Unidentified in the sense that exactly what it was was unknown.

The Image Science and Analysis Group (IS&AG) performs engineering image analysis in support of the Space Shuttle, ISS, Hubble Space Telescope, and other NASA programs. This group evolved into its current incarnation after the investigation of the STS-51L Challenger accident, and its continued existence fulfills one of the lessons learned of the accident investigation. The value of the IS&AG was reaffirmed after the Columbia accident. Investigations conducted by the IS&AG were critical in determining the cause of the accident. The IS&AG again showed it’s importance to human space flight through support to the STS-114 Return to Flight mission, identifying both debris sources and locations of potential damage. The primary areas of expertise within this group include: static 2D and 3D measurements, high-resolution motion tracking, detailed surveys and monitoring of external vehicle conditions, and thorough imagery screening (film, video and electronic).

ares.jsc.nasa.gov...

edit on 3/20/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:26 PM
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00:25 1 -


Another video with ice shed from the orbiter.

at 1:56 and 4:01



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:29 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Hey, thanks for that! That is a really great picture and made far more so by seeing what actually made it and how. I'm going to note this for my Photo class. I'm thinking they'll find the effect of exposure time for motion to be as fascinating as I have in space.

@ Thread

As for the things they are occasionally photographing up there, it's sure interesting. I know Google has this X-prize for someone to get a rover on the moon with private resources..but why not make a contest for private resources to put a couple basic, basic high resolution digital cameras on transmitters into space as mini-satellites? Instead of aiming far out or down to earth, I'd love a couple near-live views of the horizon line and space above it, where a lot of these odd things seem nicely highlighted and given some scale when captured. Well...Kinda some scale. lol

When nothing odd was around, heck..some of the most impressive vids from the ISS are from their cameras aimed right across the Horizon with as much space as Earth in view.



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:44 PM
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After about 48 hours in orbit ice is pretty rare if not non-existent because it sublimates rather quickly in orbit. I discussed this with Jim on ATS several years ago. That said, some of the examples you've posted are not ice.



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:57 PM
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OP Title says:

NOT ice crystals!

Phage say; "Ice..."


Originally posted by Phage
Another video with ice shed from the orbiter.


I hear Vegas has openings for a new comedy act




posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by zorgon
 

Anything to contribute to the topic?

Do you think that the objects seen passing between the external tank and the shuttle are not ice? Would you care to discuss it?



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 11:08 PM
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Originally posted by lost_shaman
After about 48 hours in orbit ice is pretty rare if not non-existent because it sublimates rather quickly in orbit. I discussed this with Jim on ATS several years ago. That said, some of the examples you've posted are not ice.


As I recall, this 'discussion' was just YOU proclaiming that you were the expert on ice in space and so there couldn't BE any after a few days, and since you said it, that settled it, and that ended the discussion.

Since there are continuous sporadic releases of fluids -- water and hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide -- from many different exit points throughout a shuttle mission, I was satisfied that you were speaking from ignorance and self-delusion, and saw no point to listening to your repeated refrain about how you knew better.

Let me go find a video of the famous 1984 'pissicle' that formed outside the water dump port and hung on for the entire mission, and even some of it remained AFTER entry and landing.

But that's only reality speaking -- your imagination trumps that, every time. Eh?



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 11:25 PM
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Originally posted by zorgon
OP Title says:

NOT ice crystals!

Phage say; "Ice..."


Originally posted by Phage
Another video with ice shed from the orbiter.


I hear Vegas has openings for a new comedy act


Photos 2, 3, 7, 8 are ice? Phage should consider getting a seeing-eye dog! The comedy act would be Phage and Anunaki10. Love 'em or hate 'em!



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 11:29 PM
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Originally posted by JimOberg

Originally posted by lost_shaman
After about 48 hours in orbit ice is pretty rare if not non-existent because it sublimates rather quickly in orbit. I discussed this with Jim on ATS several years ago. That said, some of the examples you've posted are not ice.


As I recall, this 'discussion' was just YOU proclaiming that you were the expert on ice in space and so there couldn't BE any after a few days, and since you said it, that settled it, and that ended the discussion.

Since there are continuous sporadic releases of fluids -- water and hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide -- from many different exit points throughout a shuttle mission, I was satisfied that you were speaking from ignorance and self-delusion, and saw no point to listening to your repeated refrain about how you knew better.

Let me go find a video of the famous 1984 'pissicle' that formed outside the water dump port and hung on for the entire mission, and even some of it remained AFTER entry and landing.

But that's only reality speaking -- your imagination trumps that, every time. Eh?


I recall that you could only provide examples of documented failures that resulted in known water leaks such as the example you just referenced. Those all resulted in documented reports on these failures.

Edit: NASA was able to detect these leaks. Other 'alledged' water ice events occured on nominal missions where no leaks where detected or confirmed. So it's good that you remebemer our conversations but please don't claim I'm ignorant.
edit on 21-3-2012 by lost_shaman because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 12:11 AM
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reply to post by The Shrike
 

I didn't say anything about those images being ice.

#2 Could as easily be (and more likely is) a smudge or a reflection on the window as an alien craft. The original images before and after it have any number of "anomalies". The image in the video had a 3 second exposure, the odd shape would be a result of camera movement.

#3 Is hard to track down because the ID is wrong but it looks like it could be a scanned image with a fiber caught in the scanner.

#7 Is more likely a reflection from inside the shuttle than an alien craft.

#8 Another reflection.

Speaking of reflections, did you see this thread?
www.abovetopsecret.com...

edit on 3/21/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:02 AM
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Originally posted by lost_shaman

Originally posted by JimOberg

Originally posted by lost_shaman
After about 48 hours in orbit ice is pretty rare if not non-existent because it sublimates rather quickly in orbit. I discussed this with Jim on ATS several years ago. That said, some of the examples you've posted are not ice.


As I recall, this 'discussion' was just YOU proclaiming that you were the expert on ice in space and so there couldn't BE any after a few days, and since you said it, that settled it, and that ended the discussion.

Since there are continuous sporadic releases of fluids -- water and hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide -- from many different exit points throughout a shuttle mission, I was satisfied that you were speaking from ignorance and self-delusion, and saw no point to listening to your repeated refrain about how you knew better.

Let me go find a video of the famous 1984 'pissicle' that formed outside the water dump port and hung on for the entire mission, and even some of it remained AFTER entry and landing.

But that's only reality speaking -- your imagination trumps that, every time. Eh?


I recall that you could only provide examples of documented failures that resulted in known water leaks such as the example you just referenced. Those all resulted in documented reports on these failures.

Edit: NASA was able to detect these leaks. Other 'alledged' water ice events occured on nominal missions where no leaks where detected or confirmed. So it's good that you remebemer our conversations but please don't claim I'm ignorant.



Thanks for the detailed response which helps identify the faulty assumptions you've guessed at, which lead you to the erroneous deductions.

Leaks on the shuttle are actually particularly hard to detect because they are usually small seepages and don't affect quantity guaging at all. Often they are first detected by visual observation of a particle stream [Skylab-4, for example]. Also, nozzle temperature sensors are supposed to provide clues, because they may show abnormal cooling that is caused by fluid evaporation. When I was first in mission control, at the auxiliary propulsion consolte [STS-1 and -2], one of my duties was to monitor for leaks, so I worked very hard at developing techniques and imagining failure modes -- and we saw them.

So leaks occurring throughout an entire mission duration were part of my professional experience, despite your confident 'common sense' proclamation that they couldn't happen and.or always would be documented. Please adjust your assumptions to be more congruent with reality.



posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 12:57 AM
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Originally posted by JimOberg
snip
Thanks for the detailed response which helps identify the faulty assumptions you've guessed at, which lead you to the erroneous deductions.

Leaks on the shuttle are actually particularly hard to detect because they are usually small seepages and don't affect quantity guaging at all. Often they are first detected by visual observation of a particle stream [Skylab-4, for example]. Also, nozzle temperature sensors are supposed to provide clues, because they may show abnormal cooling that is caused by fluid evaporation. When I was first in mission control, at the auxiliary propulsion consolte [STS-1 and -2], one of my duties was to monitor for leaks, so I worked very hard at developing techniques and imagining failure modes -- and we saw them.

So leaks occurring throughout an entire mission duration were part of my professional experience, despite your confident 'common sense' proclamation that they couldn't happen and.or always would be documented. Please adjust your assumptions to be more congruent with reality.


Question from left field ... There are several products made to stop leaks. I have never used them but I take it that the sealant blocks further leaks by producing a "wall" at the opening preventing water or whatever from continuing to move out through the hole/opening. I'm not proposing the products for shuttle leaks. What I'm thinking is that nature produces a "stop leak" by freezing nake water in space. So, if the shuttle has holes all over the place the first thing I think of is pressure and the shuttle emptying or imploding.

But I don't know about those things so let me get to the other thought. If a water drop leaks out into space, wouldn't it freeze in situ and therefore blocking any other drops waiting their turn to exit? I'm being simplistic but I'm sure you know what I'm addressing. Wouldn't the leaks happen only in the lower atmosphere below the freezing point?

Is there any way to pinpoint leaks on the shuttle, creating a safer vehicle? Could the leaks rupture if enough ice builds up in these exit openings?



posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 04:42 AM
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Originally posted by The Shrike
So, if the shuttle has holes all over the place the first thing I think of is pressure and the shuttle emptying or imploding.


Yeah its a good thing NASA mothballed those old leaky dinosaurs, but your right,,, they could have used some of that liquid metal in a tube
I mean after all didn't they use Duct Tape to get Apollo 13 back home?



Its even on sale now so it would fit NASA's current budget

List Price: $10,000.00
Price: $54.00

You Save: $9,946.00 (99%)

goo.gl...
edit on 22-3-2012 by zorgon because: Gremlins did it :shk:



posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 04:54 AM
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reply to post by The Shrike
 


Very interesting....they cover up scary information



posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 07:52 AM
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Sorry, I've lost the sense of this thread's direction totally.

The leaks that I've been familiar with are at seals, not in the sides of tanks. Sorry if I didn't make that clear.

Earthside analogy: leaking or seepage from toilet water reservoir. Sure, you might suspect a hole in the side of the tank. But > 999 times out of a thousand it's a warped gasket at the stopper.

Leaks CAN be hazardous but usually only when both propellants leak into a sealed environment, mix, and explode -- like the Mars probe in 1992 probably did.

Also, many releases are intentional -- water dumps and flash evaporator tests, for example.



posted on Mar, 22 2012 @ 06:08 PM
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reply to post by The Shrike
 

Is the #6 (WITH THE WEIRD DOUBLE FRAME) from the Martyn Stubbs master of the Mir Fly-around at the secretnasaman channel on youtube, or a copy by others..or by Luna?

And re ice..not on that Mir clip, as objects move about for at least 10 unedited mins. on the raw version.



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