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California Assembly gives standing ovation to 5 illegals!!!

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posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:12 PM
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A few pages ago on this thread, somebody accused me of lying about my kids bringing home Spanish homework. The school was Georgia Brown Elementary School in Paso Robles, California. This statement is from their own website: schools.pasoschools.org...


Two Way Language Immersion Georgia Brown's Two Way Language Immersion program is a unique opportunity that brings together Spanish and English speaking students in an effort to develop full bilingualism in both groups.

Children are mixed together all day, and the primary language of instruction is Spanish. It is an "additive bilingual" program, meaning that all students learn a second language without compromising their first language. Students at Georgia Brown will: Develop fluency and literacy in Spanish and English. Acquire knowledge in all academic subjects and reach the academic standards established by the district. Cultivate an appreciation and understanding of other cultures, inspiring self-esteem. Strengthen positive attitudes among students, families, and communities.


Note that the primary language of instruction is ENTIRELY IN SPANISH, which is convenient since most of the kids who go there are hispanic. My kids were transfer students and were put in a temporary classroom in the back of the school with the other transfers who didn't speak spanish, even thought they were all different grades. They would often run out of English homework sheets for the poor little American kids who weren't bilingual in the back porta-building, so they ended up with homework in Spanish, which they couldn't read.

My daughters only spent 1 year there because that school was a ridiculous experiment which the mexicans loved and the kids who transferred there hated because they were treated like special-needs kids and kept away from the school population.

My daughters were also told that, because their eyes were green and their hair blonde, that they were the "wrong color" for that school by the other children.

Homework all in spanish was sent home with them, several times, and all I did was write across it "MY CHILD DOES NOT SPEAK SPANISH, PLEASE SEND ENGLISH HOMEWORK NEXT TIME".

The school was a liberal's wet dream, and our worst nightmare. I hated that school and my daughters weren't learning anything except a few cuss words in spanish. It was a happy day indeed when we left that insanity and moved away from a state that punished us for not being a mexican.




posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:26 PM
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reply to post by FissionSurplus
 




Children are mixed together all day, and the primary language of instruction is Spanish. It is an "additive bilingual" program, meaning that all students learn a second language without compromising their first language.


Lol that is rich, so basically what it should say is



One Way Language Immersion Georgia Brown's One Way Language Immersion program is a unique PC trajedy that forces English speaking students to learn Spanish in an effort to develop full bilingualism in English speaking students.

Children are mixed together all day, and the primary language of instruction is Spanish. It is an "additive bilingual" program, meaning that all English speaking students learn a second language.



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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This was just too good, freaking ATS adds i love them.



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:46 PM
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I don't really care about how anyone's grandparents came into the country, the fact is that they probably didn't have to go through all of the screening and spend all of the money that you have to spend now in order to enter the U.S. legally.

Do I think illegal immigration is right? No I do not. But I'm also not going to sit here and hate on people for trying to make a better life for themselves and their families. I knew if I were living in a 3rd world country that had been ravaged by drug violence and a corrupted government I would be crossing that border too!


Plus I think the dream act is a great idea, the government is doing the right thing by not deporting these kids. They are smart and if given the opportunity they would gladly help out the U.S. instead of going back to their country.

Live and let live.



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:51 PM
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Originally posted by muse7
I don't really care about how anyone's grandparents came into the country, the fact is that they probably didn't have to go through all of the screening and spend all of the money that you have to spend now in order to enter the U.S. legally.

They had screening back then too, what cracks me up is that these people have the 10,000 to pay a coyote to get them across the boarder but when it comes to rounding up the 8 to pay a lawyer to expedite the process they are suddenly poor people again.



Do I think illegal immigration is right? No I do not. But I'm also not going to sit here and hate on people for trying to make a better life for themselves and their families.

I don't hate illegals I don't think anyone does. The state is the real problem. I could no more blame illegals than i could blame cockroaches for eating a sandwich i left out in the middle of the floor. Now imagine the landlord(state) comes around and says how bad the roaches have it and how you should leave more of your food out for them. See how crazy that is?



Plus I think the dream act is a great idea, the government is doing the right thing by not deporting these kids. They are smart and if given the opportunity they would gladly help out the U.S. instead of going back to their country.


Again, people just don't get it. The dream act has nothing to do with deportation, it is free college for illegal immigrants. So once again it is better to be illegal.
edit on 20-3-2012 by DavidWillts because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 10:55 PM
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reply to post by DavidWillts
 


Would you please be so kind as to link me to the part of the dream act that states that they would be attending college for free?

I've been going over it for the past 10 minutes I have yet to read that part.



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 11:11 PM
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Originally posted by muse7
reply to post by DavidWillts
 


Would you please be so kind as to link me to the part of the dream act that states that they would be attending college for free?

I've been going over it for the past 10 minutes I have yet to read that part.


That is okay, they are kind of secretive about it too.
www.californiadreamact.org...
But here you go


www.aroundthecapitol.com...
AB 130 (Cedillo)
Student financial aid: eligibility: California Dream Act of 2011.

Existing law requires that a person, other than a nonimmigrant alien, as defined, who has attended high school in California for 3 or more years, who has graduated from a California high school or attained the equivalent thereof, who has registered at or attends an accredited institution of higher education in California not earlier than the fall semester or quarter of the 2001–02 academic year, and who, if he or she is an alien without lawful immigration status, has filed a prescribed affidavit, is exempt from paying nonresident tuition at the California Community Colleges and the California State University.

This bill would enact the California Dream Act of 2011.

This bill would provide that, on and after January 1, 2012, a student attending the California State University, the California Community Colleges, or the University of California who is exempt from paying nonresident tuition under the provision described above would be eligible to receive a scholarship derived from nonstate funds received, for the purpose of scholarships, by the segment at which he or she is a student.

The Donahoe Higher Education Act sets forth, among other things, the missions and functions of California’s public and independent segments of higher education, and their respective institutions of higher education. Provisions of the act apply to the University of California only to the extent that the Regents of the University of California, by appropriate resolution, act to make a provision applicable.

This bill would find and declare that the amendments to the Donahoe Higher Education Act described above are state laws within the meaning of a specified federal provision.



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 11:13 PM
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reply to post by DavidWillts
 


Yes they do pay people to help them cross the border but most of them take up to 10 years to save up the money to do so.

Also there's no way for someone to become a legal U.S. resident if they don't have an employer that is willing to sponsor them, a close relative (mom/dad) or are married to a U.S. citizen. I bet that if we allowed them to fix their status by joining the army then they would be gladly lining up to do it.

Anyway, continue living in your black and white world.

Cheers.



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 11:16 PM
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Originally posted by DavidWillts

Originally posted by muse7
reply to post by DavidWillts
 


Would you please be so kind as to link me to the part of the dream act that states that they would be attending college for free?

I've been going over it for the past 10 minutes I have yet to read that part.


That is okay, they are kind of secretive about it too.
www.californiadreamact.org...
But here you go


www.aroundthecapitol.com...
AB 130 (Cedillo)
Student financial aid: eligibility: California Dream Act of 2011.

Existing law requires that a person, other than a nonimmigrant alien, as defined, who has attended high school in California for 3 or more years, who has graduated from a California high school or attained the equivalent thereof, who has registered at or attends an accredited institution of higher education in California not earlier than the fall semester or quarter of the 2001–02 academic year, and who, if he or she is an alien without lawful immigration status, has filed a prescribed affidavit, is exempt from paying nonresident tuition at the California Community Colleges and the California State University.

This bill would enact the California Dream Act of 2011.

This bill would provide that, on and after January 1, 2012, a student attending the California State University, the California Community Colleges, or the University of California who is exempt from paying nonresident tuition under the provision described above would be eligible to receive a scholarship derived from nonstate funds received, for the purpose of scholarships, by the segment at which he or she is a student.

The Donahoe Higher Education Act sets forth, among other things, the missions and functions of California’s public and independent segments of higher education, and their respective institutions of higher education. Provisions of the act apply to the University of California only to the extent that the Regents of the University of California, by appropriate resolution, act to make a provision applicable.

This bill would find and declare that the amendments to the Donahoe Higher Education Act described above are state laws within the meaning of a specified federal provision.




I fail to see where it says they would be attending college for free.

You must mean "nonresident tuition"? If so then that simply means out of state tuition.

They would be exempt from paying out of state tuition. But they would be required to pay in-state tuition.



Learn something new everyday huh?



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 11:20 PM
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reply to post by muse7
 




Yes they do pay people to help them cross the border but most of them take up to 10 years to save up the money to do so.

What does that have anything to do with anything? You were the one saying that


.. and spend all of the money that you have to spend now in order to enter the U.S. legally.


So they deserve it because they saved up to do something illegally when they could have used that money to do it legally?



Also there's no way for someone to become a legal U.S. resident if they don't have an employer that is willing to sponsor them

And that is not hard, the US actually gives them lists for this kind of thing
www.h1base.com...



Anyway, continue living in your black and white world.

It may not be as nice as liberal la la land but it is more real.



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 11:22 PM
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reply to post by muse7
 


Read the whole thing...


California who is exempt from paying nonresident tuition under the provision described above would be eligible to receive a scholarship derived from nonstate funds received, for the purpose of scholarships, by the segment at which he or she is a student.


And the second part


students.berkeley.edu...
The second part of the Dream Act, AB 131, goes into effect January 1, 2013, and allows students who are exempt from paying nonresident tuition under AB 540 and who are ineligible for federal financial aid to receive grants and scholarships from state and University sources.


Scholarships+grants=free $$$ for school



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 11:54 PM
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I say let them come on! You step across the border you serve 4 years for the country! Let them see whats its really like to earn your spot! Makes no sense to allow them to break a law and then walk freely in this country that people give their lives for everyday!



posted on Mar, 20 2012 @ 11:58 PM
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Let's take a look at Mexico's immigration policy, shall we?

From: blog.heritage.org...


There is no shortage of criticism of our immigration laws from detractors who contend that they are unjust and immoral. And though criticism of U.S. immigration laws can be fierce – particularly in the case of Arizona’s SB 1070, the Support our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhood Acts – Mexico’s much harsher immigration laws rarely get noticed. Upon Arizona’s passage of SB 1070, critics attacked the law with claims of racial profiling. Among the opponents were the open border lobby, including the Mexican American Legal Defense Fund (MALDEF), other liberal interest groups, President Obama and Attorney General Eric Holder. In addition to critics here at home, the bill also found an enemy in Mexican President Felipe Calderon. He famously lectured our country in his address to Congress in 2010, declaring that the law “ignores a reality that cannot be erased by decree” and “[that it] introduces a terrible idea using racial profiling as a basis for law enforcement,” he said to cheers from some in the House chamber. The speech and Calderon’s remarks received considerable media attention, particularly from a largely sympathetic Hispanic media. But receiving far less scrutiny was how President Calderon and his country are dealing with illegal immigration. Upon closer examination, Arizona’s SB 1070 looks like amnesty compared to Mexican law.



The Law Library of Congress released a report in April 2006 titled, Immigration Law Sanctions and Enforcement in Selected Foreign Countries: Brazil, Egypt, Japan, Mexico, Sweden, and Switzerland. The report observed how Mexican law considers “legal entry a federal crime … penalized with imprisonment for up to two years, a fine from three hundred to five thousand Mexican Pesos, and deportation.” Repeat offenders receive even harsher sanctions of 10-year imprisonment and a fine of up to five thousand pesos and deportation. Although Mexico recently reformed the Ley General de Población (General Law of the People) in January 2011, our neighbors to the south continue the policy of maintaining fines at the current level of five thousand pesos, or $418.10 in March 2011, for those who don’t follow deportation orders (Chapter 8, Article 117). Among the other findings of the Library of Congress, through its “enforcing arm, the National Institute of Migration –INAMI” (the equivalent of ICE here in the USA), the Mexican Police Force, may carry out the following:” (Chapter 10, Article 151) Perform verification visits Cause a foreigner to appear before immigration authorities Receive and present complaints and testimony Perform migration inspection operations on routes or at temporary points different from established inspection locations Obtain such other elements of proof as may be necessary for the application of the Act, its regulation, and additional administrative provisions Lastly, “the authorities of the country, whether federal, local, or municipal, and the notaries public and commercial brokers are required to request that the foreigners whom they deal with prove their legal presence in the country” and illegal immigrants who wish to get married to Mexican citizens “must request authorization from the Secretariat of the Interior.”



In contrast, let’s look at the far less complicated17-page Arizona legislation that caused so much uproar last year, even though it’s clear that many of the fiercest critics neglected to read it. Law enforcement officials can only check on the immigration status of an individual after a lawful stop, detention, or arrest for “any other law or ordinance of a county, city or town or this state.” And they can only check on the immigration status if they have a “reasonable suspicion” that the individual is an alien and is unlawfully present in the United States. Further, the Arizona law specifically prohibits racial profiling – race and ethnicity cannot be considered by law enforcement officials. The Arizona law also states that: “Except as provided by federal law, officials…may not be prohibited or … restricted…for the following purposes”: (8.F) Confirming the identity of any person who is detained (8.F.3) If the person is an alien, determine whether the person is in compliance with the federal registration laws prescribed by Title II, Chapter 7 of the Federal Immigration and Nationality Act. (8.F.4) Transport any convicted alien who has been released from jail to the “custody of the USICE or the USCBP. (8.C) In other words, the law simply makes it a state crime to be in the state of Arizona illegally and requires law enforcement officials to check on the legal status of persons who have been detained or arrested for other reasons but only if there is a reasonable suspicion.[ex]



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 12:24 AM
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reply to post by muse7
 

Do you really think it's fair for citizens in Texas, who have paid thousands of dollars in federal taxes, should have to pay out of state tuition if their kid wanted to go to a school in another state...........while someone here illegally pays a lower tuition to go to the same school with federal funded grants? I think that's absurd and insulting.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 12:27 AM
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Originally posted by Drew99GT
reply to post by SheeplFlavoredAgain
 


That really is the most sensible post in this thread. Thank you! I to want a realistic solution to the problem, but the problem is, the parties at the table with agendas are still feeding at the trough. Politicians, especially Democrats and bleeding heart liberals, want the illegals here for votes. The liberals think the illegals need to be coddled and cuddled so they don't get their feelings hurt. The business people want them here to depress wages (and believe me, they depress wages for EVERYONE, not just fruit pickers and janitors).

IMO, a solution to illegal immigration that resembles legal immigration of the early 20th century ain't gonna happen. Like I said earlier, Anglo Saxon's are literally a dying people. Mexicans and people of Latino background are becoming VERY powerful in the United States politically.
It is not just a problem for the Anglo Saxons. This domination of immigration by one group, namely Hispanic illegals is making things very difficult for Asian and African and eastern European immigrants. To them it is a matter of bait and switch. They come here and go through the difficult process of putting their cultures and customs on the back burner to adopt those of the land in which they hope to realize their American Dreams...dreams and aspirations that are pretty much what Anglo Saxon Americans share. People who come here legally do so usually because they admire our way of life and want to contribute to it and share in it...not siphon off from it. Instead they find something else switched into its place...this same mess we are complaining of, a confusing system that puts the needs and language and demands of an entirely different culture on an equal or better footing than the American one. They find themselves wondering what country they immigrated to, the USA or Mexico?

In all fairness to Hispanics, as I do hate racism and I do have Hispanic friends whose views deserve to be represented, I have to point out there are plenty of Mexicans and other Latino immigrants who aren't thrilled about this illegal business either or the pressures to NOT assimilate. They came here legally because they love America and want to be Americans. They get furious when they catch flack for not speaking Spanish or not supporting causes being championed by illegals. This great noisy arrogant entitled movement is a much worse thorn in their sides than for any of us. Imagine what it feels like to be them caught in the middle like this, being decent and doing the right thing but being rejected and hated because others of their ethnicity are being so troublesome.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 12:49 AM
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Muse7 there is no doubt immigration needs some reform and does need to be streamlined. I can see that as I watch my mother finally go through the process to change her long term resident alien status to one of full citizenship. The bureaucracy of it all is typically convoluted. But to give a free pass to those who bypass it altogether and then go on to pillage our benefits system that legal citizens can't even get access to is beyond the pale. Yes these people often are coming from dire circumstances and just want to make a better life for themselves but so are people from the Sudan and impoverished parts of Asia.

We have borders and laws in place for reasons. When my grandparents-in-law came through Ellis Island they had to be in good health and demonstrate that they could be employable. As does my mother as she goes through the process now! That was/is to protect Americans from diseases we had worked hard to eradicate in this country and to keep us a productive country. For hard luck cases we have always taken in refugees...legally documented refugees. You can perhaps reasonably argue we need to reform immigration to accommodate more refugees, but how can anyone look at the problems caused by massive illegal immigration and say just let it continue unabated.
edit on 21-3-2012 by SheeplFlavoredAgain because: Typo



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 01:12 AM
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reply to post by headorheart
 


So they came here as toddlers and children (under the age of 18 which is the age of adulthood in most states), brought by their parents no less, they grew up being "American", they graduated high school, they are qualified to go to college yet they can't because their parents brought them here illegally while they were toddlers/children. Listen, for them to do it the "right" way (which mind you, most of our ancestors just had to pay for a boat ticket and pass a health check to get into this country "legally") they would have to leave the country they've come to know as their own for about 10 years until they can even begin to process their legalization paper work. That's just cruel.

Now I get it, they're technically "criminals" due to the fact that their parents violated immigration law in coming here illegally but since when did we become a society that holds children responsible for the crimes of their parents. To put it in a different scenario; a couple drives down the road with their child in the back seat, the car stops in front of a bank. The two parents get out of the car holding their child's hand, commit pre-meditated murder when they kill the security guard and the tellers, shoot up some customers and then take money. The couple, along with their child are now speeding down the freeway, cops in tail. They get arrested, now do we also toss the child in jail and charge him/her with first degree murder and with the bank robbery and the police chase? NO! Then why do you people think these kids deserve to get handcuffed, removed from their surroundings which they feel they belong, then punish them for a crime their parents committed? How is that even rational?

I would understand if these kids came here at age 16 on their own and tell themselves "hey lets just go to U.S, get a free education and somehow mooch off their welfare system (which by the way, proof of legal residence is needed to attain any benefits), and then demand citizenship!" but the truth of the matter is that they were brought here as children by their parents, not of their own accord. Give me an example of a 1-10 year old who can make their own choices without parental consent and i'll shut up!



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 01:17 AM
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In all fairness to Hispanics, as I do hate racism and I do have Hispanic friends whose views deserve to be represented, I have to point out there are plenty of Mexicans and other Latino immigrants who aren't thrilled about this illegal business either or the pressures to NOT assimilate. They came here legally because they love America and want to be Americans. They get furious when they catch flack for not speaking Spanish or not supporting causes being championed by illegals. This great noisy arrogant entitled movement is a much worse thorn in their sides than for any of us. Imagine what it feels like to be them caught in the middle like this, being decent and doing the right thing but being rejected and hated because others of their ethnicity are being so troublesome.


It's not a good feeling I know, my daughter is half spanish and I have some close hispanic friends. We talk about this topic on occasion and it sucks the way some perceive them. The biggest hurdle I see is the fact that it has now been turned into a racial issue instead of one for responsible immigration. It's not about race for most of us in the US but that will be the card they play from here out.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 03:02 AM
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reply to post by Daedalus24
 




So they came here as toddlers and children (under the age of 18 which is the age of adulthood in most states), brought by their parents no less, they grew up being "American", they graduated high school, they are qualified to go to college yet they can't because their parents brought them here illegally while they were toddlers/children.

JESUS if you are going to even bother to comment on an issue at least get EDUCATED about it. Before the dream act they COULD go to college, they just had to PAY and out of state tuition. Just like if you came from Wisconsin to go to school. With the dream act they no longer had to pay the out of state tuition and then they were able to get grants and scholarships. READ the articles the illegals protesting were already STUDENTS for crying out loud.



Now I get it, they're technically "criminals" due to the fact that their parents violated immigration law in coming here illegally but since when did we become a society that holds children responsible for the crimes of their parents.

Since the invention of prisons



To put it in a different scenario; a couple drives down the road with their child in the back seat, the car stops in front of a bank. The two parents get out of the car holding their child's hand, commit pre-meditated murder when they kill the security guard and the tellers, shoot up some customers and then take money. The couple, along with their child are now speeding down the freeway, cops in tail. They get arrested, now do we also toss the child in jail and charge him/her with first degree murder and with the bank robbery and the police chase?

That is a horrible analogy as we are not deporting those illegals a more accurate one would be letting the parents kill and rob the bank and then letting the child keep the money because that is exactly what is happening. And in real life that kid in the back seat would get screwed, he would get put in a state run foster home which is pretty much just diet juvenile hall.



I would understand if these kids came here at age 16 on their own and tell themselves "hey lets just go to U.S, get a free education and somehow mooch off their welfare system (which by the way, proof of legal residence is needed to attain any benefits),

Lie


www.gao.gov...
In fiscal year 1995, about $1.1 billion in AFDC and Food Stamp benefits
were provided to households with an illegal alien parent for the use of his
or her citizen child.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 03:20 AM
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Originally posted by headorheart
I just don't get it. Five criminals stand in front of the government, admit they're criminals and get a standing ovation? If you love America so much and have such pride and determination, become a citizen the right way.They should be arrested and deported along the way.


Agreed, call sheriff Joe, he could use a warm up!


Hey, I just had this idea. I can just go to Mexico and maybe get some land and a job and everything I desire because they're all here!

edit on 21-3-2012 by ajay59 because: to add

edit on 21-3-2012 by ajay59 because: (no reason given)



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