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ISP's to now be officially and openly watching your downloads

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posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 10:46 PM
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Wavin guys, heads up, your ISP's will soon be tracking your downloads starting july 12.

its all being done in the name of so called "copy righted files and programs" but this is just
another attack run on the free internet, everyone go underground with cb's cause thats our last
free communications.


Comcast, Cablevision, Verizon, Time Warner Cable and other Internet service providers (ISPs) in the United States will soon launch new programs to police their networks in an effort to catch digital pirates and stop illegal file-sharing.

Major ISPs announced last summer that they had agreed to take new measures in an effort to prevent subscribers from illegally downloading copyrighted material, but the specifics surrounding the imminent antipiracy measures were not made available. Now, RIAA chief executive Cary Sherman has said that ISPs are ready to begin their efforts to curtail illegal movie, music and software downloads on July 12.

Read more: www.foxnews.com...




posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 10:54 PM
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So it begins......

instead of the united states building more prisons to cater for the downloaders, maybe they should just build a wall around the entire country.



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 10:57 PM
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they have a wll around the US of A it is caled the TSA
and this is probably a component of the end of free speech as we know it as well

of course the security perimeter extends to Canada and Mexico as well
they will drop that shoe soon enough



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:10 PM
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reply to post by radiotracker350
 

Does this mean that when I use Preview to take a screen shot and bring it here that I am an Internet Pirate?



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:13 PM
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Geesh, do they want to know what kind of bra I wear too? Seems like everything is monitored.

The only people you can really blame for this, are the pirates. [The bad apples]

The white hat hackers
The black hat hackers
The grey hat hackers

They pretty much ruined the internet for everybody.
edit on 17-3-2012 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:13 PM
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reply to post by radiotracker350
 


One more reason to buy your goods locally, including the choice of an ISP.



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:15 PM
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They aready do, ive got like 5 warnings for downloading movies/tv series i wasnt suppose to and they never do anything. Idc let them monitor my downloads, its mostly movies/music/games/porn anyway, its not like im downloading a bomb..... yea i sad it... BOMB....



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:16 PM
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Originally posted by radiotracker350
Wavin guys, heads up, your ISP's will soon be tracking your downloads starting july 12.

its all being done in the name of so called "copy righted files and programs" but this is just
another attack run on the free internet, everyone go underground with cb's cause thats our last
free communications.


Comcast, Cablevision, Verizon, Time Warner Cable and other Internet service providers (ISPs) in the United States will soon launch new programs to police their networks in an effort to catch digital pirates and stop illegal file-sharing.

Major ISPs announced last summer that they had agreed to take new measures in an effort to prevent subscribers from illegally downloading copyrighted material, but the specifics surrounding the imminent antipiracy measures were not made available. Now, RIAA chief executive Cary Sherman has said that ISPs are ready to begin their efforts to curtail illegal movie, music and software downloads on July 12.

Read more: www.foxnews.com...



IN the US is the key term here.

Anyway, who cares.....with a good VPN and a little knowledge not even your ISP can detect what you are downloading!!!



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by radiotracker350
 

Pssst! Encryption. They'll be monitoring nothing then.
Well, a large stream of unintelligible garbage maybe...


Bittorrent sucks but does support encryption and configurable ports, as does https, ftps, email, instant messaging...

"Hubi, hubow ubare yubou?"
(Hi, how are you?)



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:25 PM
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Originally posted by Manhater
Geesh, do they want to know what kind of bra I wear too? Seems like everything is monitored.

The only people you can really blame for this, are the pirates. [The bad apples]


Don't be surprised if they already know what kind of bra you wear!!

Um, no. I'm not blaming the pirates! That's like sayin the dogs are to blame for all the fences everywhere?



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:26 PM
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I can't help but think that this is merely just a scared straight style approach to piracy and/or downloading copyrighted material.

Reason being is, I can't fathom how they are going to undertake this "monitoring" of what is being downloaded. Consider the subscribership numbers, then consider the amount of bandwidth each subscriber is using. Do you realize how many IT geeks they'll need to hire to monitor all this traffic. Then, who is tasked with determining if what was downloaded is considered pirated or copyrighted?

Even if they used software similar to what a lot of companies use to limit employees from surfing certain internet sites e.g. Barracuda's web filter. First they would need to identify where pirated and copyrighted material was housed, then they would still need to employ people to extrapolate the data and then have people to determine it was in fact illegal.

Not to mention, this is just on the conventional web, this isn't even taking into account IRC and other underground resources for said material.

I just don't see them having the resources available to handle this and encompass their whole subscribership.



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:29 PM
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ISPs have been logging DNS requests for ages, this is unfortunately just a natural progression of that. The issue at hand unfortunately is that Hollywood has a hell of a lot more money than the rest of us, so they can pretty much buy whatever they want as far as legislation and controls go. If you really want to get off the grid in this area you need to go old school, back to the days of "sneaker net"



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:35 PM
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Originally posted by Manhater
Geesh, do they want to know what kind of bra I wear too? Seems like everything is monitored.


edit on 17-3-2012 by Manhater because: (no reason given)


I doubt it...remember this is Hollywood that has pulled these strings and they have really good looking women whose bras are probably more pleasing to the eye!!! Just a thought. You asked



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:37 PM
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reply to post by Helig
 



ISPs have been logging DNS requests for ages


Indeed logging, but not analyzing to the extent they would need to, to be able to nail every person downloading illegal content. Which is what the announcement seemingly portrays imo.

It's no different than speeding on the highway. There is a speed limit sign posted and there are police occasionally present to nail the unlucky ones, but how many people speed each day that do not get caught despite the latter?

To me, it seems like this will be the same approach due to lack of available resources vs. the number of potential offenders.



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 12:30 AM
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There are a number of problems with this whole system beyond, or rather in addition to, the obvious civil liberties. These are somewhat more pragmatic issues but then the devil is always in the details.

1. The system will be automated. This means that we can extrapolate the the abysmal success rate of DMCA automated take down notices so that we can expect a flood of false positive hits on infringement. The DMCA results are well reported, including the identification of bird calls in the background of a nature video as copyright content. That ought to teach those birds.

So what is the upshot of all these false reports? Legal action in some cases (and guess where the ISPs will get the money to settle these suits and pay the lawyers? Yes, by passing on the costs to the customers) but also more costs and staff to process, review and assess all of those complaints. And that is more costs.

2. The system will be used for more than piracy investigations. Once it's there, law enforcement, private investigators and others will point out "Since you already have collected the data, what harm could there be in letting us take a look too?" After all, those national security letters that were supposed to be for terrorism investigations are actually being used in drug investigations.. Given power, authority always finds a way to exploit it.

3. So much data on so many people. There are hackers, identify thieves and a whole bunch of other people are out there salivating over the opportunity to collect all this information that is being sucked up, and by companies that really have no idea how to keep their systems secure.

4. So much more work. So many more employees. So much more infrastructure. But the end result is more costs to be passed along to the consumer. And as all the traffic passes through these additional layers, it would be delusional to think that network throughput levels will remain constant. Choke.

5. Of course we need to do some sort of deep packet inspection, we may as well collect all sorts of other data that we can sell to all those marketing firms out there.

Necessity is the mother of invention. I predict that within 6 months a whole bunch of new technologies will emerge that will totally bypass all of these systems the ISPs will have in place. What a waste.



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 01:45 AM
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Originally posted by Manhater
Geesh, do they want to know what kind of bra I wear too? Seems like everything is monitored.

The only people you can really blame for this, are the pirates. [The bad apples]

The white hat hackers
The black hat hackers
The grey hat hackers

They pretty much ruined the internet for everybody.
edit on 17-3-2012 by Manhater because: (no reason given)


Who the hell brought you the internet in first place, do you think it all put itself together and one morning half the world was interconnected big bang style? Hackers created it all and gave it to the world to be a completely free of regulation and filtering uber giant database of knowledge and information to be access by whoever wanted... Then big corps saw the "business" potential and turned it into the spam rich P.O.S it is today who's on the verge of completing its last and final steps into a useless commercial entity void of real intellectual content.

Get a culture...



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 06:27 AM
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i agree with jazzguy..well said


XL5

posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 08:05 AM
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IF they can see the movies you watch by what ever means before they go after you, download the most vile legal videos there are! Once they see those 2 girls and what not enough times, they may not want to look anymore.

The reason for this is not the pirates or hackers, its money/greed. You never saw the makers of the records, 8-tracks, cassettes complain when technology surpassed them. Hell, back in the day of cassette's, people would record friends tapes, the radio and any where else they could get music, it was never a bad thing back then. The only reason its bad now is because they can track it and put a number to it. They shoud know though, you don't need the internet to share music and movies, sure it may be more hassle, but you get more "in real life" friends that way.

I wonder what would happen if we got the Star Trek replicator, would they claim we are stealing Mc food or I tech if it makes it out of garbage/energy?



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 09:00 AM
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I don't think the ISP's are going to be actively monitoring the traffic. They 'only' have to record it. When one of the movie or record companies wants the information, they will ask the isp for the data.
I work for a cable company, and my job is cable modems. I'm not one of the big companies, and our total modem bandwidth exceeds 9 gigs per second every night. We have about 60,000 modem customers in our system. Our isp currently does not monitor the specific traffic any customer uses, but they must answer questions about who has a specific ip address when they have a copyright infringement notice sent to them.
How do they record/movie companies know the ip address? Simple. They watch the servers that serve the files and collect ip address's connected to the servers, then they send info to the isp asking (no, TELLING the isp )them to notify the customer about it. Its currently 3 strikes and you are out, but I think that may change. Personally, I think the record/movie companies have servers set up themselves for baiting people to go there and use their service, so they can get specific information, such as which movie or song being taken.
I can't imagine the storage space required for our isp to store all of this information, and at this point I presume it is up to the isp to come up with a plan and purchase the equipment necessary to store this.

snrRog


edit on 3/18/2012 by snrRog because: Typo



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 09:18 AM
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uTorrent already supports encryption, but those bastards are getting smarter in using traffic patterns to monitor the usage. They can suspect with a high degree of suspicion that someone is torrenting, but can they prove it is illegal things being downloaded? Nope, so if they shut me down for downloading, lawsuit comes there way.



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