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The NSA Is Building the Country’s Biggest Spy Center

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posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 01:03 PM
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Originally posted by LightSpeedDriver
reply to post by Bedlam
 

Well, all I know is Bruce Schneider is a good guy and on our side. Cryptography is way too math based for me to understand at all really but I do know they are constantly testing various methods for their effectiveness and weaknesses. AES Rijndael is the currently advised one if memory serves. I'd be interested to know if anyone has developed an effective attack against it though.



do what i say.just double encrypt it.

you encrypt your secret with a password or key.

then encrypt it AGAIN with a different password/key.

and of course you can do this it MORE than TWICE....

i.e. you are encrypting the encrypted information.

it will impossible to decrypt it as you will just get unknown gibberish even if you break the first encryption

you can even devise simple software to automate this.

so the multibillion evil scheme of these power mad monkey people has just been defeated.






this way
edit on 1-4-2012 by beckybecky because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 01:47 PM
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Originally posted by beckybecky


do what i say.just double encrypt it.

you encrypt your secret with a password or key.

then encrypt it AGAIN with a different password/key.

and of course you can do this it MORE than TWICE....

i.e. you are encrypting the encrypted information.

it will impossible to decrypt it as you will just get unknown gibberish even if you break the first encryption

you can even devise simple software to automate this.

so the multibillion evil scheme of these power mad monkey people has just been defeated. this way
edit on 1-4-2012 by beckybecky because: (no reason given)


"Double" encryption is not necessarily doubly protecting. MOF, most efforts at doubly the encryption I have seen have lessened the overall protection offered by a well encoded single encryption scheme.

E,g. If there is an interaction between the two algorithms - maybe even an interaction specific to your keys in those two algorithms - that reduces the security in some way you haven't thought of. An obvious case wherein multiple passes of the same encryption algorithm actually end up producing the plaintext, and the other of a real-life case (2DES) where the effective key-length is not doubled, but merely increased by one, due to a slightly more innovative attack than the obvious brute-force.

Applying two algorithms does not multiply their effectiveness together. It might even be weaker than one alone.

edit on 1-4-2012 by PulsusMeusGallo because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by PulsusMeusGallo
 


you are totally wrong.you have not read what i wrote.

decrypting will be impossible as you cannot read the resultant gibberish as it is encrypted as will make no sense .

also the time taken will be increased exponentially.


you are destroying one to one relationships.



look:-


byftlj;lrtuk'gr 1st

vggkl,l;ikhr 2nd


ghhikl; iyhrtrewe result.


no connection between result and 1st.



see?
edit on 1-4-2012 by beckybecky because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 05:57 PM
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reply to post by beckybecky
 

Personally I'd prefer a single, effective cipher and encryption. Another way to go might be Deniable Encryption. Some products offer this already, such as TrueCrypt. I'm bad enough at remembering one password or key, never mind multiple.



posted on Apr, 1 2012 @ 06:11 PM
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I can't help but think a literal final judgement may occur, deciding who is with em and who is against em


That's what I've been saying for years and no one takes it seriously.

I wonder how many people in the military industrial intelligence complex care or even realize that this is completely unconstitutional?



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 08:10 AM
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The latest thing to go classified in encryption is that new twist on chaotic encryption. Someone found a way to do it digitally, now they're going at it full blast. Supposedly, chaotic encryption schemes may not be solvable with quantum computation, but that's to be seen.



posted on Apr, 2 2012 @ 09:22 AM
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Originally posted by beckybecky
reply to post by PulsusMeusGallo
 


you are totally wrong.you have not read what i wrote.


I read what you wrote and it is nonsense. Let's take this up with my friends and myself on sci.crypt, resident professional cryptologists. See you there.



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 11:03 AM
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Originally posted by PulsusMeusGallo

Originally posted by beckybecky
reply to post by PulsusMeusGallo
 


you are totally wrong.you have not read what i wrote.


I read what you wrote and it is nonsense. Let's take this up with my friends and myself on sci.crypt, resident professional cryptologists. See you there.



no it is not.
,
i can easily challenge you by double encrypting ,say, 20 pages from a novel and it will be impossible for you decrypt as no relation exists between original text and final encryption as explained above.

not only that to defeat decryption simply use software that limits the number of tries to 7 an hour and or double the time for every incorrect try....


see no matter how super duper your computer is there will never be enough time as explained above.



posted on Apr, 3 2012 @ 02:25 PM
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reply to post by beckybecky
 

Waiting for you...

Becky Becky O Where Arst Thou?

..don't be shy!!!



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 11:07 AM
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reply to post by PulsusMeusGallo
 


i have already been there and posted my replies day before yesterday.

i see you avoided my challenge.

hence i declare victory.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 11:22 AM
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When its time to delcare marshal law and open those FEMA camps, all that data will help TPTB determine who and what they need to take care of first to make a seamless transmission.



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by beckybecky
reply to post by PulsusMeusGallo
 


i have already been there and posted my replies day before yesterday.


Sorry, liars, fires and pants, you know. Looks like Tom has a few words for you though.



becky becky Gets Helpful Hint
edit on 4-4-2012 by PulsusMeusGallo because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 4 2012 @ 12:48 PM
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No wonder the nation's budget is constantly over $1.3 Trillion in debt every year since 2008



...The $2 billion NSA Utah Data Gathering Center (code name Stellar Wind) will be able to intercept and store every electronic signal on the planet by 2013....



not only this threads focus: The Stellar Wind Project...

but in another article from April 2 ... it was stated that inside sources say some 30,000 drones are being ordered to glide over the 'Homeland' on a 24/7 surveillance program.



Trillions for the empires military... billions in bonuses for the elites.... just fema camp gulags for us 99% minions
whose income increased by $80. a year on average



posted on Apr, 5 2012 @ 07:57 AM
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The OP should rename this thread "we want to understand where and how ATS members hide their messages".

TK was right trW has satellites that can probe the human brain from LEO, we are helpless. The Navy has been experimenting on captive dolphins for decades. They blast them with a sonic signal that has just the right dot eighth delay to drive them mad, then monitors their right hemispheric parietal lobes for activity.

The technology has evolved way beyond monitoring at the point of encryption, these days they monitor at the point of thought conception.
edit on 5-4-2012 by Cauliflower because: (no reason given)
edit on 5-4-2012 by Cauliflower because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by Cauliflower
 



The OP should rename this thread "we want to understand where and how ATS members hide their messages"

Or maybe" we now want to store and reference ATS members messages, and then use them against them(if need be)
I think the capabilities of this system can record everything by everyone all the time. Heck if you figure in tech that the public is not privy to, then yea this facility could be doing things beyond most of our imaginations.
I have said it before, anonymity is sooo last century!

spec



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 04:44 PM
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Originally posted by speculativeoptimist
reply to post by Xieon
 

Well I guess in the spirit of "do nothing wrong, there's nothing to worry about," some may not be concerned, whereas others just don't like having everything they do tracked and stored electronically. It does seem inevitable in this electronic world we live in, and there is certainly nothing we can do about it now that it's built, but I can see both sides of the argument, even in a defense sense. It is natural that people have mixed feelings, but at the least be made aware I suppose.

spec

Hi, spec. Thanks for the info. I particularly was stirred by this comment of yours, as I have heard it so often since 9/11. It's along the lines of "why would they pick you to do that to......" "I don't care if they watch me and mine my info as I'm doing nothing wrong...." These are responses tailored to derail. Having said that, however, I want to point out that instead of do nothing, there is nothing that can be done. Sorry, don't mean to rain on anyone's rebel parade, but just don't believe there is anything anyone can do anymore..... It's a closed system, and we are within it, and the rest is called a fait accompli, IMHO.....



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 04:48 PM
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Originally posted by speculativeoptimist
reply to post by Cauliflower
 



The OP should rename this thread "we want to understand where and how ATS members hide their messages"

Or maybe" we now want to store and reference ATS members messages, and then use them against them(if need be)
I think the capabilities of this system can record everything by everyone all the time. Heck if you figure in tech that the public is not privy to, then yea this facility could be doing things beyond most of our imaginations.
I have said it before, anonymity is sooo last century!

spec

oh and this^^
Around 2003, maybe even before, I remember reading that the NSA was building a "supercomputer" which would track all purchases, cell phone calls, etc...and activity of the public as consumers in order to ascertain certain "security risks" to our "way of life." This and much more has been ongoing for quite some time. But then, I am also one of those who believe we long ago reaching the "singularity" and are controlled for quite some time by a quantum device......and all this is just the repeat...for said device to defend itself for its previous actions in regards to life, or the ending of it.
anyway, interesting information you have provided.
edit on 7-4-2012 by tetra50 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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I don't have any pictures, but I saw that they are building a new big facility at Fort Gordon, GA, as well. Looks like we got our money's worth. It's big, shiny, lots of glass. Looks like they spared no expense.


/TOA



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 06:40 PM
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Congressman Hank Johnson (D-Georgia) questioned NSA director and CYBERCOM commander General Keith Alexander regarding reports that the NSA is intercepting U.S. citizens' phone calls and e-mails.


What is going on here? Is CYBERCOM commander General Keith Alexander lying to Congressman Hank Johnson?

He says the NSA doesn't have the technical capability to intercept domestic emails. He says that they are not collecting nor are they authorized to collect from service providers. We already know about programs like Thinthread and Trailblazer, and the NSA has blacksites inside service providers like AT&T.


ATS: AT&T Narus Collaboration Sent Your Private Internet Communications to The NSA





I suppose General Alexander forgot to mention that the NSA is building a new 2 billion dollar facility that will do everything Congressman Johnson asked him about.



edit on 7-4-2012 by freelance_zenarchist because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2012 @ 11:04 PM
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reply to post by tetra50
 

Don't worry, I am no rebel in this case, just an observer and contemplator. It is what it is, and while I personally think it would be wrong to monitor and collect communications of everyone, what could we do? Call our reps and express displeasure, but man, under the Patriot Act and the wide application of the "T" word, it's already a Brave New World.









 
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