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Do stars strobe green, red and white?

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posted on Apr, 8 2012 @ 06:24 AM
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reply to post by NotAnAspie
 


How long did the strobing lasted??




posted on Apr, 8 2012 @ 06:38 AM
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reply to post by hisshadow
 


The twinkling is due to scintillation.

Here's some good shots and explanation:

Link




posted on Apr, 8 2012 @ 06:42 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


I love your photo. Shows scientific details (the spectrum apparently changing color due to atmospheric perturbations) yet it is beautyfull.



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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Havnt you guys hear that little song? The one that goes "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star"
How do you think it got its name?
edit on 5-5-2012 by Juggernog because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 10:47 PM
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we can talk about this phenomenon all day but until someone can explain why it happens to one star but not the star right next to if it is an earthly atmospheric condition... we are still getting nowhere.

that is a stumbling block to understanding, not exactly helpful. Anyone can look up a word and use it, but isn't it more about relaying the understanding through explanation of what it is... rather than just labeling it?

in another language, it's called something else.

and how far are we getting with this now?



posted on May, 5 2012 @ 10:55 PM
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Originally posted by Juggernog
Havnt you guys hear that little song? The one that goes "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star"
How do you think it got its name?
edit on 5-5-2012 by Juggernog because: (no reason given)


*sigh*

shakes ....

because the star in the song twinkled... obviously.

what in the world does that have to do with why and how?

really, a lullaby? I feel i need to make you aware of something but i'm not sure how. we as humans all joke around and can really cut the fool the deep at times... and this is supposed to be helpful, innocent and polite... but you might not be aware that it is actually deeply disrespectful to just assume that people cannot understand a more technical definition of this word and phenomenon. it is not expanding on knowledge, it is deeply offensive on a level you might not really understand.

Do you baby talk people?

i do too at times and in some circumstances like it quite a bit. not when I'm asking a serious question. realize you may not have meant it this way, but this is deeply offensive to the psyche of someone who has not walled their ego up by pretenses... and are therefore more subject to this kind of thing.

why, because i know exactly what it means whether you meant it as a offense or not.

it means you think others are perhaps too dumb to comprehend something above the level of a lullaby.

that's actually quite a preconceived notion if you would just stop and think about it for a minute or two.



posted on May, 6 2012 @ 05:06 AM
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Originally posted by NotAnAspie
we can talk about this phenomenon all day but until someone can explain why it happens to one star but not the star right next to if it is an earthly atmospheric condition... we are still getting nowhere.

OK, give an example of a non-blinking star.



posted on May, 6 2012 @ 05:43 AM
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Originally posted by ArMaP

Originally posted by NotAnAspieere.
star.


some blink... some blink like a stop light going out of control.. as if it is almost signalling- trying to get attention. i saw one of these stars and would still like to see a thorough star chart that maps out the satellites as well because I am starting to wonder if some of these crazy blinking stars are not satellites and they are either screwing with people trying to influence this particular conspiracy market or they are screwing with people in order to make them feel dumb when they realize it's a star. i saw one and before anyone had even looked at what i was seeing i had dozens of people telling me over and over and over.. it's a star, they twinkle you know... over and over people just repeating the same thing. to me, that is not showing any ounce of objectiveness and since i wouldn't answer back repeatedly like that in that manner, i found it very very odd... but i have to take into account how a lot of other people think. that ones been a big obstacle for me because some ways i just don't understand.

here's the thing. you have two stars right next to each other of about the same size. ne is basically twinkling a little while the other is going. RED BLUE GREEN HAPPY FREAKING NEW YEAR LOOK OVER HERE HEY YOU LOOOK! i mean when a star grabs your eyes out of peripheral vision like that and just stars blinking at you like mad and people are like 'atmospheric conditions, star twinkle all the time" i just want to know why the others right beside it aren't STROBING. it's has to be something else besides just our own atmospheric conditions or it would be happening to the star close to it. now if it is something to d with activity of THAT STAR... fine, it's the star but i've still yet to hear the explanation other than the repeating of the same word over and over. i tend to think they could be satellites and are emitting some type of energy that is more prone to make the colors so variable that way yet so pronounced. the colors could still be explained by shining through a spectrum effect in the atmosphere, but the light was just too intense and beaming over this way irregularly rather conspicuously. artificial light, artificial energy... not HUGE but looking much closer than the twinkling stars that appear different... twinkling from much further away even if they are the same size and you would assume are shedding a similar amount of light.

but it's like "uh oh... somebody is wondering about something... STOP HER STOP HER BEFORE IT GOES TOO FAR AND SHE ACTUALLY LEARNS SOMETHING"

it's bad when you can't ask questions and even though the answers do little to explain what you are talking about, that's the end of the story... zip it! this creates a very bad habit in society imo. people become afraid to ask questions and debunk everything their own minds ever wondered about, people stop learning and communication fails... ceases. it becomes too painful to even seek understanding. it's also kind of contagious because when people do that to one person, that person will start getting annoyed as hell at things people say that THEY think aren't too bright, which maybe in a completely different field, like emotional ignorance or something like that but it is a problem. an ongoing problem.

in my case, i wasn't looking to just be shut up so i could rest my .. i was looking for answers and wanted people to see exactly what i was seeing because the whole thing had a very weird feel to it and i think others would have felt that if they had seen what I was seeing that night (which certainly isn't among the strangest things i have seen so it wasn't a huge deal just odd) but now I am being asked to give an example of a star that ISN'T twinkling and i must say, i just don't get. i don't understand what you are getting at. how is this going to help answer anyone's questions? maybe i'm just not understanding you but yeah, most stars are twinkling to a degree and some more so than others by being close to the horizon and emitting more light, but to see a relatively small star going off like a Christmas tree and one of the same size or larger right next to it just twinkling a little and nowhere near as much color... well, that's the difference.

i mean are you being sarcastic and just making a point that most do twinkle some or are you genuinely trying to factor things out because i just can't feel you on this one. what is it you are wanting from me exactly. help me help you get an answer if that is what you are looking for. if you are not looking for an answer to something... wellllll. what are you doing then? debunking something you didn't even see??

i hope not, i hope not because you can't get past a very fundamental principle flaw right there. it just doesn't fit that way.

my best guess is it's artificial, closer, more pure or true white so it separates in spectrum vividly, obscured by less dust.



posted on May, 6 2012 @ 05:51 AM
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Originally posted by swan001
reply to post by NotAnAspie
 


How long did the strobing lasted??


A couple of hours I guess. it did taper off. i do believe it had at least something to do with the spectrum effect of the atmosphere but others next to it... different story. this is what confuses me. It was just *extremely* blinky. i wasn't even looking in that direction when it grabbed my attention.



posted on May, 6 2012 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by NotAnAspie... but now I am being asked to give an example of a star that ISN'T twinkling and i must say, i just don't get. i don't understand what you are getting at. how is this going to help answer anyone's questions?

When you wrote "why it happens to one star but not the star right next to if it is an earthly atmospheric condition" I thought you were talking a blinking star with a non-blinking star next to it, so I asked for an example.


maybe i'm just not understanding you but yeah, most stars are twinkling to a degree and some more so than others by being close to the horizon and emitting more light, but to see a relatively small star going off like a Christmas tree and one of the same size or larger right next to it just twinkling a little and nowhere near as much color... well, that's the difference.
Now I understand that you are talking about stars blinking in different ways (or at least I suppose I understand it).


i mean are you being sarcastic and just making a point that most do twinkle some or are you genuinely trying to factor things out because i just can't feel you on this one.

I was trying to understand what you were talking about and trying to find an explanation for it. Knowing where we can find an example of a non-blinking star (or of a pair of stars close to each other from our point of view but with different blinking patterns) is the best way to start, because there are several charts and programs that can tell what star is that, or if it isn't a star at all.


what is it you are wanting from me exactly.
An example.
Knowing which stars are you looking at you/we can know if it's a star, a planet or a satellite (or even an unknown object), and if it's a star we can try to understand why is it blinking in different way when compared to other close by (from our point of view) start. It could that they are at different distances, it could be a difference caused by the type of star (I don't know if a red giant, for example, blinks in a different way of a star like our Sun), etc.



posted on May, 6 2012 @ 08:27 AM
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oh...I see. It has been a bit since the discussion about that all stars blink at least a little. this was not fresh in my mind when you asked for an example. i thought you were either being rhetorical or wanting to make some comparison i wasn't clear on.

i have yet to find a decent star chart that is free. i mean, i hate that i can't get one but no way am i paying for a star chart right now. now, if i had one... I *might* be able to find it again, but that's a big might. maybe, who knows. i was looking in relation to other stars so it might be possible. actually i did find some drag and click thing but that was a bitch. if i recall i want to say that from it i was thinking it was in a short C word constellation but I'd have to see the word and look at it all over again and that thing had many stars. i think more stars shown whether the eye can usually see them or not, so possible but maybe not. I did try though... and then again it's been a while...plus the interface was kinda small.
edit on 6-5-2012 by NotAnAspie because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 6 2012 @ 08:40 AM
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I always thought the varience of twinkle factor had to do worth gas clouds and debris between the observer and the star. Sure our atmosphere has an effect, and due to the different wavelengths of light from one star to another, it may make one seem to bounce through the warmer colors of the spectrum, while a closer brighter star may hold its 100,000 kelvin color better.
Seems perfectly normal and logical to me.



posted on May, 6 2012 @ 09:25 AM
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reply to post by NotAnAspie
 





Scintillation or twinkling are generic terms for rapid variations in apparent brightness or color of a distant luminous object viewed through a medium, most commonly the atmosphere (atmospheric scintillation). If the object lies outside the Earth's atmosphere, as in the case of stars and planets, the phenomenon is termed astronomical scintillation; if the luminous source lies within the atmosphere, the phenomenon is termed terrestrial scintillation. As one of the three principal factors governing astronomical seeing, atmospheric scintillation is defined as variations in illuminance only, and so twinkling does not cause blurring of astronomical images. It is clearly established that almost all scintillation effects are caused by anomalous refraction caused by small-scale fluctuations in air density usually related to temperature gradients. Normal wind motion transporting such fluctuations across the observer's line of sight produces the irregular changes in intensity characteristic of scintillation. Scintillation effects are always much more pronounced near the horizon than near the zenith (straight up). Parcels of air with sizes of the order of only centimeters to decimeters are believed to produce most of the scintillatory irregularities in the atmosphere. Atmospheric scintillation is measured quantitatively using a scintillometer.


en.wikipedia.org...(astronomy)



posted on May, 6 2012 @ 09:37 AM
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Originally posted by usmc0311
When stars and planets are lower on the horizon they tend to twinkle more and often seem to strobe different colors. Sirius is known for looking like a siren when it is lower. We have atmospheric disturbance to thank for this cool effect. As well as the angles being greater when it is lower on the horizon so you are not looking straight through if your understanding me.

The one your describing sounds like Sirius.
edit on 16/3/12 by usmc0311 because: added content.


Are you sirius??


No siriusly, It is a cool effect and whenever I go out at night and look up it blows my mind how far away that light is and how long it takes it reach my retina. pretty awesome stuff indeed.



posted on May, 14 2012 @ 07:46 AM
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Originally posted by assspeaker
I always thought the varience of twinkle factor had to do worth gas clouds and debris between the observer and the star. Sure our atmosphere has an effect, and due to the different wavelengths of light from one star to another, it may make one seem to bounce through the warmer colors of the spectrum, while a closer brighter star may hold its 100,000 kelvin color better.
Seems perfectly normal and logical to me.


this is a much better answer in my opinion than the PLETHORA of posters who are repeating the exact same thing over and over and over, like the one right below you. This actually has the potential to lead to more possibilities in understanding why two stars right next to each other of the exact same size are not doing the same thing. Although i really have no way of knowing if this is indeed the case, it could be a possibility and it's certainly more helpful than all the broken records repeating the same thing that can't explain it.

If OUR atmospheric conditions are causing it, then it would be happening to stars beside it.

At least someone is understanding what I'm trying to explain here. At least you are getting it and why the blanket answer that people keep throwing around is just too easy and i would appreciate it if they would just knock it off because they haven't put any time or real thought into their answers and are just regurgitating definitions, and they seem to be like little robots... they just keep coming and coming like some kind of virus program and put a real obstacle on truly trying to understand what i was seeing that night.

I have also seen stars do this higher up in the sky yet not nearly as bright as the one I saw that night.
I mean it really freaked me out because it pulled my attention away from another direction. it was SERIOUSLY doing some blinking.

If it is a star, now to figure out what is going on with that particular star... because I have never seen anything like it. I'm glad someone is at least listening to the description... because I have enough common sense to know that some answers just don't fit and if they can't understand this simple little point, I don't feel they've got any business copying and pasting easily obtained definitions at me. If they can't listen to the simple reason it isn't adding up to me, they don't qualify to be shoving textbook answers down my throat.

It's VERY annoying.

If you have any links to any more in depth information on what you are saying, please post them.

..and sorry for the rant but I had some problems in this thread with certain people.
edit on 14-5-2012 by NotAnAspie because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 03:39 AM
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Did u ever find out what that red green blue blinking thing was?
Cause I too have seen exactly what u are talking about & still don't understand WHAT IT CAN BE!!!
edit on 21-1-2014 by cloudboy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 04:01 AM
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reply to post by NotAnAspie
 


It is probably a lot of factors to take into consideration. Actual distance from the star, size of the star, what gasses the stars are made up of, what range of light they are emitting, and the angle through our atmosphere. While all the stars look very close in size from our perspective, some are thousands of times bigger than others.
edit on Tue, 21 Jan 2014 04:02:32 -0600 by TKDRL because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2014 @ 06:54 AM
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reply to post by NotAnAspie
 


99 times out of a 100 it's Sirius the brightest star in the sky if its not that it's usually one of the other bright stars.

The colours are very noticeable due to the brightness of the star, because the light is passing through our atmosphere, through layers of different pressure and temperature the light gets refracted so you see different colours the same process happens with sunlight through raindrops to cause a rainbow.

There are plenty of sites that give more info on scintillation (star twinkle)
edit on 21-1-2014 by wmd_2008 because: (no reason given)

edit on 21-1-2014 by wmd_2008 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2014 @ 02:59 PM
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It's most definitely Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky.

But it's probably too late answering a two year old question


Although Sirius is visible now (being a part of winter sky, along with Orion), so some people might have seen and noticed it too.
edit on 24-1-2014 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2016 @ 03:59 PM
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I noticed these red, blue and white strobes in the sky a year ago. I started to investigate on the Internet and found ATS. These are not stars and they are NOT UFOs. The only thing I can figure is they are a sky grid for the military since there are multiple strobes. Im new to this site but it is interesting. a reply to: cloudboy



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