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Do stars strobe green, red and white?

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posted on Mar, 16 2012 @ 09:35 PM
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Originally posted by usmc0311
When stars and planets are lower on the horizon they tend to twinkle more and often seem to strobe different colors. Sirius is known for looking like a siren when it is lower. We have atmospheric disturbance to thank for this cool effect. As well as the angles being greater when it is lower on the horizon so you are not looking straight through if your understanding me.

The one your describing sounds like Sirius.
edit on 16/3/12 by usmc0311 because: added content.


Hi usmc,
I would agree with you. Sirius puts on a great show from the Florida Keys.
The reef off shore would always provide some atmosphere to help the twinkle.
I would watch it in the winter months.
The first time it caught my eye I thought if fit the discription of the kind of UFO sightings that were popular back then.




posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 12:23 AM
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reply to post by ProudBird
 


What do you think of this. Now I personally watched mercury twinkle on the horizon just last week when we had clear enough skies to catch a short glimpse of it.
www.spaceweather.com...



SCINTILLATION SQUIGGLES: Everyone knows that stars twinkle but planets do not. The reason has to do with angular size. Stars are distant pinpricks smaller than the thermal irregularities in Earth's atmosphere that refract their light. Each packet of air that passes in front of a star produces a well-defined change in color or brightness. Planets, on the other hand, are relatively nearby and wide; they span many atmospheric irregularities, which tends to smooth out the prismatic action.

Photographer Monika Landy-Gyebnar of Veszprem, Hungary, has found a kinetic way to demonstrate the effect. "When photographing a star or planet, kick the tripod during the exposure." She's applied this technique to many stars and planets, and the resulting collection of squiggles reveals the character of their twinkles:



"If we take a photo of a star with a shaking camera, the result is a wavy line with many colors," she points out. "If we photograph a planet, however, there is no change; the color and width of the squiggle are nearly constant."

The scintillation effect is greatest for stars near the horizon, which must shine through a greater distance of turbulent atmosphere. Angles noted in the image above are altitudes. The lowest-hanging stars display the strongest and most colorful twinkling.

"Demonstrating this is a 'must-do' thing when you give a lecture or show on astronomical observations for novices," she concludes.



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 06:44 AM
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reply to post by usmc0311
 


Those look like the same exact lines that I capture on camera sometimes.
edit on 17-3-2012 by Manhater because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 07:52 AM
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Originally posted by NotAnAspie

Originally posted by usmc0311
When stars and planets are lower on the horizon they tend to twinkle more and often seem to strobe different colors. Sirius is known for looking like a siren when it is lower. We have atmospheric disturbance to thank for this cool effect. As well as the angles being greater when it is lower on the horizon so you are not looking straight through if your understanding me.

The one your describing sounds like Sirius.
edit on 16/3/12 by usmc0311 because: added content.


yes, I understand that but i have never seen a star do this in my 37 years of looking at the sky. If stars do this i want someone to video it because i am looking at this through binoculars and it looks crazy to me.


Then you haven't been looking hard enough, Sirius is FAMOUS for this, MANY MANY ufo reports in the UK during the winter months are due to this, if you do a google search you will find reports about it!



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 08:02 AM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


I love that star

In the winter in NY, I could sit on my front porch and look at it. Now I have to go in the backyard to see it



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:04 AM
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Originally posted by TKDRL
reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


I love that star

In the winter in NY, I could sit on my front porch and look at it. Now I have to go in the backyard to see it

Hi tkdrl,

Is winter in NY over already? I have heard it's been quite mild.
You could try using a mirror from your porch.
Why did you have the house turned around in the first place.
Did you move?
Sorry about the sad face.



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:10 AM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


Oh yeah, I moved to canada lol. My buddies back in NY are all taking their crotchrockets out today, so I think it must be pretty warm there



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:13 AM
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reply to post by usmc0311
 


Scintillation. It is caused by the Earth's atmosphere.


What do you think of this. Now I personally watched mercury twinkle on the horizon just last week when we had clear enough skies to catch a short glimpse of it.


I think the person who said that planets do not scintillate is wrong.

You, yourself, noted that Mercury, "on the horizon", did "twinkle". Of course....especially when viewed low "on the horizon", because then you are viewing at an oblique angle, through the Earth's atmosphere....compared to when a star or planet is directly at zenith, overhead.....

....this is why many telescopes on Earth are built at high elevations....on tops of mountains. It's to have as little of the atmosphere "in the way" as possible.

I thought everyone on this planet understood this simple concept?? Guess I was mistaken.

What a shame......



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 11:44 AM
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Originally posted by TKDRL
reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


Oh yeah, I moved to canada lol. My buddies back in NY are all taking their crotchrockets out today, so I think it must be pretty warm there



Sweet, I used to ride my Z1 Animal, the original crotchrocket, from NY to Montreal.
later



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 01:35 PM
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reply to post by ProudBird
 


Yeah I could'nt believe that when I read it on spaceweather.com. Exspecially with all of the written evidence of it already out there. They just don't teach kids astonomy anymore. Most of what I know has been self taught or learning from others more experienced than myself. Thanks.

And it is a shame. I am probably the only person I know that could navigate by the night sky. They don't even teach that in the military anymore either.
edit on 17/3/12 by usmc0311 because: added content.



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 01:41 PM
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reply to post by NotAnAspie
 






Scintillation or twinkling are generic terms for rapid variations in apparent brightness or color of a distant luminous object viewed through a medium, most commonly the atmosphere (atmospheric scintillation).



en.wikipedia.org...(astronomy)



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 01:43 PM
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reply to post by ProudBird
 


Don't be a snob, not everyone is a scientist, or even wishes to be one. Not everyone has a need to know about it, it don't effect their everyday life.



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 02:32 PM
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Originally posted by TKDRL
reply to post by ProudBird
 


Don't be a snob, not everyone is a scientist, or even wishes to be one. Not everyone has a need to know about it, it don't effect their everyday life.


Hi tkdrl,

I don't mean to be nosey but a guy on another thread warned me about some of these birds on here. He advised me to just ignore them.
Some of my buddies at a Green Eggs and Ham, Patty's day brunch told me they could even be machines or computer programs, void of human life and emotions.
They remind me of HAL from the 2001 Space movie.
Talking about those squiggly time lapse photos is alot more fun. Not just to understand the universe but they look cool too.
cheers



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 06:22 PM
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Originally posted by TKDRL
reply to post by ProudBird
 


Don't be a snob, not everyone is a scientist, or even wishes to be one. Not everyone has a need to know about it, it don't effect their everyday life.


So a scientist is a snob then
No Proudbird has a decent level of education and an interest in a few subjects discussed on here thats all.

Maybe if a few others on here were like that this place wouldn't have so many BS threads



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 06:36 PM
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reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


It's not being a "snob" to know facts, and to understand science.

Shame it would be to remain ignorant, and to NOT strive to learn as much as one could.....

....ever seen the movie Idiocracy???

Maybe you should, as a cautionary tale..........



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 08:10 PM
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Originally posted by ProudBird
reply to post by longjohnbritches
 


It's not being a "snob" to know facts, and to understand science.

Shame it would be to remain ignorant, and to NOT strive to learn as much as one could.....

....ever seen the movie Idiocracy???

Maybe you should, as a cautionary tale..........

Proud,
I didn't say you were a snob.
If you say I did you will remain ignorant, remain ignorant.
I have not watched the movie Idiocrocy.
If you are trying to boast that you are the star, then I will pass.
I would use that time talking to pleasant members in a pleasant manner.
Happy ST. Pats day to you
edit on 17-3-2012 by longjohnbritches because: forgot good wishes for the bird



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 08:22 PM
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reply to post by ProudBird
 


I am personally very appreciative of you guys. I have a great deal of knowlege on some things but when I am looking for answers on here, you and others are always quickley there to answer questions and point people in the right direction. So thank you, and I look forward to more answers and advice from you all in the future.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:03 PM
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Hi, this is my first time posting. I have seen this star in the sky for the past 3 days also and am very curious about it. I live south of Rochester, NY and I am looking southwest. I live within 8 miles of the city so I can't see every star clearly but this star is so bright I can see it through my screen door and still see it twinkle different colors. I love looking at the sky, especially at Orion's belt and I have NEVER seen this before. It's located from my perspective to the left and a little bit south of the belt.

People on here keep saying it's due to the fact that it's close to the horizon but this star is not, it's in the middle of the sky....every other star in the sky i can see twinkling and some are changing colors, but NONE like this.

Someone else asked if New York was done with winter. Yes it is. it was 79 today....which only furthered my concerns.



posted on Mar, 21 2012 @ 11:14 PM
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reply to post by wmd_2008
 



I thought everyone on this planet understood this simple concept?? Guess I was mistaken. What a shame......


That came across as pretty snobish to me.



posted on Apr, 8 2012 @ 06:21 AM
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I'm in the south east too

You have found Sirius ! A dual star system that appears to twinkle n shifts from red.. to green to blue and back again

When I first found it, I figured it was a pulsar.. but i'm assuming the color shifts are due to the two stars

If you have an android phone, load up google sky and point it at the object, i bet it shows it as sirius



edit on 8-4-2012 by hisshadow because: (no reason given)





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