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American ISPs to launch massive copyright spying scheme on July 12

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posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 03:02 PM
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If you download potentially copyrighted software, videos or music, your Internet service provider (ISP) has been watching, and they’re coming for you.

Specifically, they’re coming for you onThursday, July 12.

That’s the date when the nation’s largest ISPs will all voluntarily implement a new anti-piracy plan that will engage network operators in the largest digital spying scheme in history, and see some users’ bandwidth completely cut off until they sign an agreement saying they will not download copyrighted materials.



The July 12 date was revealed by the RIAA’s CEO and top lobbyist, Cary Sherman, during a publishers’ conference on Wednesday in New York, according to technology publication CNet.



Participating ISPs have a range of options for dealing with customers who continue to pirate media, at that point: They can require that an alleged repeat offender undergo an educational course before their service is restored. They can utilize multiple warnings, restrict access to only certain major websites like Google, Facebook or a list of the top 200 sites going, reduce someone’s bandwidth to practically nothing and even share information on repeat offenders with competing ISPs, effectively creating a sort of Internet blacklist — although publicly, none of the network operators have agreed to “terminate” a customer’s service.


www.rawstory.com...

Looks like it won't take an act of Congress at all.....your Internet Service Provider will now watch your every move. Is this going to destroy the internet as we know it? Crazy.
edit on 15-3-2012 by David9176 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 03:08 PM
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We need to boycott the entire industry. Either that, or if a bunch of people get a notice on July 12 that their Internet has been disabled, they are going to be up in arms.

I'd argue that things like Bittorrent and The Pirate Bay have actually become a part of popular culture. I have friends who download episodes of TV shows constantly, and not just a few friends, lots of friends. More people I know download than those that don't. Not saying I agree, but you can't just disable something that's become part of popular culture, unless of course you want people up in arms against you.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 03:14 PM
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edit
edit on 15-3-2012 by David9176 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 03:25 PM
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See, if these law-makers are supposedly religious and believe in let's say a creator. Therefore, how does anyone have any copyrights if a creator created everything. Are we infringing on the creator's copyrights? Just a hypothetical question. What does this mean to private trackers though? I doubt it would be an actual person behind a screen spying on me, unless there's some sort of back door government subsidies incentive for doing so. It's probably just a script that checks the ip/dns and cross-checks it by 'known' 'piracy' sites. I don't think they can do it by bandwidth with so many streaming sites available. Perhaps the number simultaneous connections? That's still not concrete enough. Some people are so dumb, they have all these trojans and what not. I'm guessing it's going to be by a script. I'm totally going to violate some copyrights July 12, 2012. If they shut me down, then I don't pay!
edit on 15-3-2012 by PatriotAct because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 03:26 PM
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Originally posted by David9176

If you download potentially copyrighted software, videos or music, your Internet service provider (ISP) has been watching, and they’re coming for you.

Specifically, they’re coming for you onThursday, July 12.

That’s the date when the nation’s largest ISPs will all voluntarily implement a new anti-piracy plan that will engage network operators in the largest digital spying scheme in history, and see some users’ bandwidth completely cut off until they sign an agreement saying they will not download copyrighted materials.

Crazy.
edit on 15-3-2012 by David9176 because: (no reason given)



HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH

Im laughing so hard. They will just lose business, Pirates will switch to different internet providers that do not intrude on their privacy. In a way this is a good thing, it will expose all of the company's that do not stand behind the people. Even though we know who they are, time warrner, AT&T and verizion. Hopefully some more company's will spring up with a main goal of privacy.

Its made just to scare pirates. The website rawstory is known not to be accurate, this story will hit the mainstream if its true.
edit on 15-3-2012 by Infi8nity because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 03:27 PM
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It will be a good time for those ISP's that decide not to participate, especially if it remains an ongoing exercise.

People will be abandoning their ISP's and flocking to the competition no doubt. I will be, without a doubt.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 03:32 PM
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But what about Proxy servers? Don't they Hide/Change someones IP Address?Also what about people leaching Wireless from others? This is a really idiotic and corrupt plan. Just when you think you'v seen the bottom of the barrel with SOPA , they come back with something even asinine.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 03:35 PM
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and see some users’ bandwidth completely cut off until they sign an agreement saying they will not download copyrighted materials.


How many ISPs will see their income cut off? Everyday, I feel the internet becomes more and more useless to me anyway. Perhaps, I should just cancel my services on that day for fun. A successful national cancel your ISP day could spur a flood of incentives to sign back up.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by tamusan
 


i think how many people ditch their isp's will depend on how muck longer some of them have on their contracts and i would not put it past these company's to create a whole new fee just to try to stop such actions from being possible either way if they do it they wont be getting my buisness fee or not but for some it might be discouraging

more links www.tomsguide.com...
gizmodo.com...

www.digitaltrends.com... if people wanted different sources

edit on 15-3-2012 by KilrathiLG because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 





Its made just to scare pirates. The website rawstory is known not to be accurate, this story will hit the mainstream if its true.



As RT reported last year, a flip of the kill-switch is indeed an option that ISPs can take if they decide they find their customers at fault. That doesn’t mean it’s the be-all-end-all response, though. Under the “six-strike” policy discussed last year, each alleged instance of copyright infringement would prompt the ISP to reach out to its customer in question and inform them that they have detected a violation of US law. Strikes one through four would constitute email warnings of increasing severity, but five through six can come with legal action and end with the termination of service and potentially time behind bars.

Although cooperating ISPs said last year that they would suspend service after a certain number of infringements, today they are hesitant to announce permanently cancelling any accounts — but merely putting them on hold while users respond to their legal requests. The explanation for a change of heart, of course, comes down to money.

Earlier this year Cary Sherman penned a ranting diatribe in the New York Times attacking opponents of the failed Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect IP Act — or SOPA and PIPA, respectively — two anti-Internet legislations that had the hefty support of the RIAA.



With SOPA and PIPA out of the way for now, American users of the Web must look ahead before declaring victory in a war against online censorship. Recently the US fought and won for the extradition of a 23-year-old UK man who operated a website that American authorities decided was in violation of US law.

If they are willing to ship a college student abroad to bring him to trial for posting a few links, will they think twice before turning off your Internet for sharing your own copies of South Park?

That’s an episode you’ll have to stay tuned for to find out.



rt.com...
edit on 15-3-2012 by David9176 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 11:30 PM
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They have already been doing this on a minor scale mind you, so they can figure out how to implement the Major scale spying. I'd advise sitting down with someone that knows how to remove every last possible remote server access to your computer. This includes add ons etc that have permission to track and record all your browsing data when you install it.

Before I sat down and went through mine, sometimes my computer would have a tunnel connect to remote servers that were uploading my whole system, over 400 Megs going out and my ISP only claims 100 megs on my connection lol.
edit on 15-3-2012 by Darkchemistry because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2012 @ 01:14 AM
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reply to post by KilrathiLG
 


It's true and unfortunate that many people are now, and will continue to be, locked into a contract with their ISP. I've been going towards exclusively using the pay as you go services. I've only stayed with my cell phone company, because they have made it more attractive to stay when I call to terminate. I'm not really locked into a contract with them, as I have not taken a free phone for years. I have good internet access through them, but it inevitably gets slowed down about halfway through the month. I also have a pay as you go ISP, and it works out great for me so far. Considering how often I normally wish to go away from a company after getting locked into a contract. The only drawback with my pay as you go service is that my localized website information is always set to Chicago, despite my having never been closer than 1400 miles to the place.

But like I said, the internet is becoming more and more useless to me, as what I deem useful information becomes harder and harder to find for free. I would rather have a hard copy of my media than stare at a computer screen. I only do so now because I can often find what I need for free. If I start to have to pay for what I need to read, I will find it at the bookstore or library shelf.



posted on Mar, 16 2012 @ 04:56 AM
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reply to post by tamusan
 

I agree the net is becoming more and more unusable as time passes, wading through crap you're not looking for while doing research wastes so much time. I feel like I've won a prize when I find exactly what I was looking for in under a half hour; and if it wasn't for search modifiers like + and - and "quotes" or ctrl F, sitemap, etc....I'd have pulled all my hair out by now trying to find anything useful. I like to write but cannot stand trying to author anything on a computer; I either write on my 1960's Smith Corona, or Underwood typewriters...I can really get into a nice rhythm listening to the hammers strike the page.

There is nothing sociable about sitting alone at home on a computer.

edit on 16-3-2012 by Darkchemistry because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 16 2012 @ 10:30 AM
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One word: Tor Encryption



posted on Mar, 16 2012 @ 04:21 PM
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More corporations scratching each others backs while they try to nickle and dime the rest of the population. Not much to see here, just another aspect of American society crumbling in front of our eyes for the sake of profit.

Paul 2012? Bah.. I give up. No one is listening to us.



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 03:14 AM
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I laughed at first, because I thought this was a joke.

Then I found out they're serious...and I laughed again.

This whole plan has a big ol' "FAIL" written all over it. I feel bad for the people at these companies who are spending all these resources on this big plan.

Cheers



posted on Mar, 17 2012 @ 04:18 AM
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I bet ISPs get targetted by hackers.



posted on Mar, 18 2012 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by Infi8nity
 





RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 1 Comcast, Time Warner, and Verizon are among the ISPs preparing to implement a graduated response to piracy by July, says the music industry's chief lobbyist.


RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 1

US ISPs become 'copyright cops' starting July 12 Foxnews

Its going to happen.
edit on 18-3-2012 by sonnny1 because: (no reason given)



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