Mad Rabbit Disease

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posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 11:51 AM
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Mad Rabbit Disease


www.basqueresearch.com

The Biogune research centre has shown that rabbits, which were previously thought to be resistant to prion diseases, can also develop such infections. However, the authors of this study consider that an epidemic of mad rabbits similar to that seen in cows in the 1990s is highly unlikely.

...although rabbits are unusually resistant to prion diseases in comparison with other mammals, they can nevertheless still become infected.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.cicbiogune.es

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
SCI/TECH: Mad Cow Madness
SCI/TECH: "Mad Cow" Disease Uses Immune System to Spread in Body
Mad Cow Disease Agent Can Infect Via the Air
AIDS, Alzheimer's, Cancer - and Mad Cow Prions. What's the Story?




posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 11:51 AM
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On the surface this is pretty funny: visualize an epidemic of Mad Rabbits...

Unfortunately though, the findings seem to clarify prions' roles in evolution and life's interconnectedness.

Previously, rabbits were thought to be immune to prion diseases (like Mad Cow disease), which tend to jump between mammals. Now, scientists are asking if prions can jump even higher "barriers" to infect birds or fishes, for example. The answer is probably, "Yes."



In light of this new discovery, Dr. Castilla's group has decided to study whether prions can jump even higher barriers and infect birds or fishes, for example. In this sense, the Biogune team aims to untangle the molecular mechanisms that explain the different susceptibilities shown by species towards prions in order to mimic nature and develop new therapeutic strategies to combat transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.


The implications are huge, and Oh No!, look like they might affect the corporate bottom line.



This study opens up the debate regarding the suitability of feeding various species with animal proteins that may be contaminated with prions, even those that for many years have been considered to be resistant. “The ability of prions to adapt during their passage through various species suggests that any mammal is susceptible to infection and that the only safe means of preventing this is to avoid using feed that has come into contact with animal proteins”, concludes Dr. Castilla.


It will be interesting to see where all this might lead.







www.basqueresearch.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 15/3/12 by soficrow because: format



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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I was reading recently about a similar problem with squirrels. They were recommending that if you eat a squirrel, you don't eat any of the brain.

Not that I eat squirrel.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 12:12 PM
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reply to post by kosmicjack
 


Oh NO! ...I've been counting on squirrels and rabbits for when TSHTF!

From your source:


Doctors in Kentucky have issued a warning that people should not eat squirrel brains, a regional delicacy, because squirrels may carry a variant of mad cow disease that can be transmitted to humans and is fatal.


And lest you've forgotten my commitment to this topic.



2005: Mad Cow-causing Prions Found in All Organs

A new study confirms that prions, the infectious proteins that cause Mad Cow disease are found throughout the body. Organs previously thought to be free of prions are now known to contain them, as well as muscle, skin and blood vessels. Yale and University of Zurich researchers report that super-imposed infections play a role in causing prions to spread through the body. This study and other current research appears to validate scientists previous claims that "subclinical" prion infections are common, and may underlie epidemic rising rates of heart disease, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure and various chronic disabilities.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 12:17 PM
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posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 12:28 PM
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posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 12:56 PM
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posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 12:59 PM
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posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 01:06 PM
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posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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REMINDER:

The topic is: Mad Rabbit Disease

This is in Breaking News Forum, NOT the jokes forum. Keep to the topic and stop with the off topic jokes...

Thank you.

 



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 01:41 PM
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This wasn't what I wanted to read just after I wolfed down a lovely rabbit stew.
On the plus side, it seems that rather than being endemic, mad rabbit disease is still just a rare thing and as long as I stick to wild rabbits, I don't see much risk in eating them. Farmed rabbits may be a different proposition, however.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 01:46 PM
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That sounds terrible. I've seen mad cow disease in cattle and they don't look funny at all. They look seriously ill and suffering. I imagine mad rabbit disease wont look very pretty either.


They're probably the cutest animal too. I like rabbits.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 02:08 PM
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posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 02:33 PM
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reply to post by soficrow
 


Mad Cow disease is terrifying. I remember watching reports about infected cattle during the 90's. It worried me, as a young man, to see those cows stumbling around and seeing reports of infected people was even more frightening.
At least mad rabbit isn't expected to blow up worldwide. Scary non the less.

TXML



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by txMEGAlithic
 



Mad Cow disease is terrifying. ....At least mad rabbit isn't expected to blow up worldwide. Scary non the less.


I think the point of this research is to show that prion strains do indeed cross species barriers, and most likely higher barriers too.

Rather than being scared, we need to rethink our notions of "disease" - and just maybe, stop creating those pesky little prions just to make more money.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 07:29 PM
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I am sure I remember that the cause of Mad Cow disease was Manganese deficiency, apparently it affects the way protein molecules are folded after digestion.

And the rabbit is the cutest animal ever. I have 17 and every single one is cute.

(Although there is always one that seems a bit more mad than the others LOL. Though not as mad as my cat.haha)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 10:18 PM
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reply to post by AriesJedi
 



I am sure I remember that the cause of Mad Cow disease was Manganese deficiency


Infectious misfolded proteins, or "prions," cause Mad Cow disease. Virtually any protein can misfold, and any environmental "perturbation" can cause the misfolding if it happens at a critical time in the normal folding process - including exposure to radiation, chemicals or heavy metals, temperature changes, etc. In Mad Cow, the normal protein that misfolds is called the "prion" protein - a bit confusing as misfolded proteins also are called "prions."

Of interest - several years ago the FDA's Mad Cow Committee concluded that there was "no point" trying to filter Mad Cow prions out of vaccines because ther were so many different prions created in the manufacturing process. ...Meaning, "Why pick on one prion and not the others?"





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