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Has anyone been paying attention to the RSOE website?

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posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 11:41 AM
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Hi,

I wasn't sure where to put this so I figured fragile Earth. Mods move at your discretion.

Has anyone been paying attention to the RSOE website? I noticed the other day that there was a green line going from Aussie to Chad. A few days later, it was blue. Now it is red.

I am curious to know why RSOE would do this. Any thoughts?

hisz.rsoe.hu...




posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 11:43 AM
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I believe it is showing the projected track of of tropical storm.

2nd line.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by Jerisa
 


hurricane path and it got stronger me thinks



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 11:51 AM
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I do not have an answer, but I don't think it is to mark a hurricane track. I doubt even the strongest hurricane could make it all the way into central Africa. It is odd. I'm guessing some sort of graphics error.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 12:04 PM
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reply to post by Jerisa
 


It appears to be for Lua which now is Cat 1 ..it is forecast to possibly reach cat 4, and appears to have an Indian Ocean Track taking it right over the coast of Somalia. It may not make it near that far and fizzle out. Not sure they know, so why they would track that red line I am not sure.
edit on 15-3-2012 by DavidsHope because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by Iamschist
 


I agree-its probably an error if its the supposed storm path.
No way would it sustain all that way into Africa.

There was another thread about this a day or so ago,and I don't think anyone came to a solid conclusion on the line.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 12:46 PM
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Originally posted by Silcone Synapse
reply to post by Iamschist
 


I agree-its probably an error if its the supposed storm path.
No way would it sustain all that way into Africa.

There was another thread about this a day or so ago,and I don't think anyone came to a solid conclusion on the line.


Didn't see the other thread, can you link please? I would like to read their conclusions.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 01:03 PM
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reply to post by Silcone Synapse
 


It certainly could be a graphics error, but...

While the storm may not stay organized all the way into Central Africa, the accompanying rains could still make life really difficult in that part of the world. Here on the East Coast of the US, we've had that issue many times. Vermont, which certainly isn't Hurricane country, got walloped by the remnants of a tropical system a couple of years ago...

ETA: If there are mountain ranges along it's path, that makes things worse as the convection caused by the highlands will often squeeze a lot of water out of the clouds. Kinda like squeezing a sponge...
edit on 15-3-2012 by Virgil Cain because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 01:32 PM
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reply to post by Jerisa
 


Well its hardly worth it as there are only three short replies,but I think its about the same line(although it says a green line in this thread).
It was partly green yesterday I think.

www.abovetopsecret.com...


reply to post by Virgil Cain
 


Hmm,I was wondering if the mountains would dissipate the storm,by making some of its energy fall as more rain.
Depends on the nature of the terrain,like you said.


edit on 15/3/2012 by Silcone Synapse because: extra letters moved about for your reading pleasure as always



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 01:40 PM
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reply to post by Silcone Synapse
 


High terrain will certainly dissipate the organization along with the winds and heavy squalls, but it can make the flood potential much worse. Depending on other meteorological factors, it can also also slow down the system which once again adds to flooding problems. But as you stated, it really depends on local topography and weather patterns...



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by Silcone Synapse
 


Thank you. That was the link I was looking for. Yes, it went from green to blue to red...that is what peaked my curiosity.

Do they assign colours for reasons or is just whatever colour they prefer to play with?

As for the points, I cannot see how a tropical storm/depression would have anything to do with the line as the storm was heading the opposite direction, not towards Chad.



posted on Mar, 16 2012 @ 12:52 AM
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Well....it's unlikely it would hold together as a hurricane for that long, but it could sustain it's tropical strength long enough to reach Africa's interior if it was moving at a fast enough forward speed, AND had enough strength when and/or if it hit's Africa. But....storms usually form IN Africa, and head either East or West...depending on the time of year.

The line that's there is more than likely a misprint. Or...it is the total line of the storm from it's point of origin to where it will end. And I'm guessing....if it did come off of Africa, the line color could indicate the storms strength at the part it came from.

The storm formed off of the west coast of Australia,...at least the tropical part of it....and is expected to make landfall in the Northwest part of Australia, Not head towards Africa. As it is already moving Eastwards, not Westwards.

Check here for the most current data on this storm from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology.

Storms in late August and into early October often start in the same area and move Westward towards the US. The storm wave will come off of the West coast of Africa and into the Atlantic. They will start to "come together" in a loose tropical formation near the Azores...and even though they start as a really loose system in Africa the US Hurricane center refers to this time of year as the Azores season.



edit on 16-3-2012 by webpirate because: spelling



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