Earthquake hit Norway this evening!

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posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by quedup
reply to post by PageAlaCearl
 


Perhaps Danish.


Rogalandish methinkes.

Edit: Or not, would be marrrs then.

edit on 14-3-2012 by Ivar_Karlsen because: Old as dirt, and tired.




posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 04:35 PM
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Originally posted by PageAlaCearl

Originally posted by cayote
reply to post by PageAlaCearl
 


Actually March in Dutch is Maart according to Google translate.


Yes both words mean March, try it for yourself, translate Mars from Dutch to English, you get March, do it the other way around you get Maart.
"Mars" in Dutch is a march (you know, like soldiers marching), "Maart" is the month March.



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 04:37 PM
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Originally posted by PageAlaCearl

Originally posted by cayote
reply to post by PageAlaCearl
 


Actually March in Dutch is Maart according to Google translate.


Yes both words mean March, try it for yourself, translate Mars from Dutch to English, you get March, do it the other way around you get Maart.


The month March in Dutch is Maart.
To march, in Dutch, along with the planet Mars is Mars. Contextual difference

Back OT, does the quake graph someone posted/linked look like a regular quake? No pre-shocks or rumbles, just a huge "bang" that dies down...
Hoping an expert can chime in.



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 04:39 PM
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Originally posted by LightSpeedDriverNo pre-shocks or rumbles, just a huge "bang" that dies down...


That's the nature of most Norwegian quakes, they are often belived to be dynamite explosions.



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 04:40 PM
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Really?

The name March comes from...

The name of March comes from ancient Rome, when March was the first month of the year and named Martius after Mars or Ares, the Greek god of war. In Rome, where the climate is Mediterranean, March was the first month of spring, a logical point for the beginning of the year as well as the start of the military campaign season. January became the first month of the calendar year either under King Numa Pompilius (c. 713 BC) or under the Decemvirs about 450 BC (Roman writers differ). The numbered year began on March 1 in Russia until the end of the 15th century. Great Britain and its colonies continued to use March 25 until 1752, which was when they ultimately adopted the Gregorian calendar. Many other cultures and religions still celebrate the beginning of the New Year in March.

en.wikipedia.org...
Thanks tho....




March

Spanish: andar
Italian: camminare
German: März, Marsch, März/marschieren
Japanese: yayoi
Latin: ambulare
French: marcher
Norwegian: mars
Swedish: tåga
Portugese: Março
Swahili: Machi

common-words-translated.findthedata.org...

BTW - Marching in Dutch is marcherend in Norwegian it's marsjerende
edit on 14-3-2012 by PageAlaCearl because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 04:43 PM
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That magnitude quakes are not uncommon around Scandinavia. Caused be post-glacial rebound I guess, as this was very near to surface. Earthquakes here can be felt far away, as rock here is very solid, not fractured like areas with stronger earthquakes. We had magnitude 3.? earthquake, near coast of Sweden in 2010. It was felt over 150 kilometers from epicenter, even though it was very weak. It was also first earthquake I have felt.



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by PageAlaCearl
 


Well, I guess it's the word of native Dutch speakers against the word of 'Babylon 9'. Maybe I should ring up the Dutch Language Union to let them know some Israeli computer program has a different opinion about our language


By the way, "marcheren" is the verb derived from the noun "mars".



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 04:54 PM
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Really? We are arguing about the translation of March?

Really?

Face palm.



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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Would appreciate someone familiar with the subject at hand commenting. Please examine the following picture. It compares a (nuclear) detonation to a genuine earthquake. Someone on page one linked or posted a seismograph reading for this quake which looks suspiciously like...well, I'll let you be the judge.
Random internet source:


Linked pic from OP:

edit on 14/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: Added pic
edit on 14/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: Typo



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 04:59 PM
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reply to post by Symer
 


we can start a Dutch language learning experience here but hat does not cover the intention of the post.
But for those who want: Aap noot miep boom -> Monkey Nut Miep Tree



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by amongus
Really? We are arguing about the translation of March?

Really?

Face palm.



I really don't care just trying to figure out what the hell the article the op was referring to says and then people go on the attack. Sorry, just fending off attacks, my bad, you say 1 thing and there is 20 people chomping at the bit to tell you "you're wrong"

I think this site has turned into more of a bad day at the comedy house
edit on 14-3-2012 by PageAlaCearl because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by amongus
 


Hey now, the guy wants to learn. Isn't that what we're here for?

It's not like this minor earthquake is getting any less attention because of it.



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by LightSpeedDriver
Would appreciate someone familiar with the subject at hand commenting. Please examine the following picture. It compares a (nuclear) detonation to a genuine earthquake. Someone on page one linked or posted a seismograph reading for this quake which looks suspiciously like...well, I'll let you be the judge.
Random internet source:


Linked pic from OP:

edit on 14/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: Added pic
edit on 14/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: Typo


This looks very interesting and scary.
Does anyone have an idea on why the shape of this so called Earthquake looks of?



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 05:07 PM
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Originally posted by cayote

Originally posted by LightSpeedDriver
Would appreciate someone familiar with the subject at hand commenting. Please examine the following picture. It compares a (nuclear) detonation to a genuine earthquake. Someone on page one linked or posted a seismograph reading for this quake which looks suspiciously like...well, I'll let you be the judge.
Random internet source:


Linked pic from OP:

edit on 14/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: Added pic
edit on 14/3/12 by LightSpeedDriver because: Typo


This looks very interesting and scary.
Does anyone have an idea on why the shape of this so called Earthquake looks of?


Could this be an last test for the Seed bank they have in Scandinavia ( Norway, Sweden and Denmark )



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by PageAlaCearl
 


No-one is attacking you. Friendly people are informing you that your "guess" (your own word) about a foreign language was incorrect.
Now you could go correcting others making the same mistake


reply to post by cayote
 


The seed bank is about 1300 miles to the north of the epicenter of this minor quake. I'm guessing the seeds survived.



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 06:08 PM
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Question: Given the shallow depth of 1 km, and location close to several oil fields. (They have been sucking the area dry for 30-40 years now and are still going)

Could this be the result of the sea-floor caving in as a result of drilling?

www.emsc-csem.org...
edit on 14-3-2012 by MrSinister because: Link



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 06:34 PM
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Meeh, I couldn't feel anything



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 01:05 AM
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Well I don't know how to read those graphs, but I went through two quakes now in the past two years. The first one was a 3.6 I think, near my home, and had a loud boom then some moderate shaking that quickly died down. If I were asked to draw it using squiggles, my drawing would look like the graphs in red. The second quake was the 5.8 in Virginia. I was too far from the epicenter to note the bang sound some people heard with that one. If I were to represent the shaking with squiggles, it looks like the blue graph.

When I looked up earthquake history for my region, there were similar accounts for similar quakes and that was all well before nukes or even automatic weapons. If there were nukes involved in any of this wouldn't someone find and report high radiation readings?



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 05:45 AM
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read the story ,, the mag was 4.2 and i live in voss and felt nadda.. too bad i missed it ...



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 06:19 AM
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Originally posted by PageAlaCearl




March

Spanish: andar
Italian: camminare
German: März, Marsch, März/marschieren
Japanese: yayoi
Latin: ambulare
French: marcher
Norwegian: mars
Swedish: tåga
Portugese: Março
Swahili: Machi

common-words-translated.findthedata.org...



Funny how the topic has become the word for March. Your list here is refering to the wrong word.
At least, for french, the word used for "to march" (or walk) is used (marcher). The word for the month in french is "mars".



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