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Recognizing Paradise

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posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 10:25 AM
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Sometimes we just complicate things too much in our lives, maybe if we just took the time to slow down things could be allot different.

I found something on the net that resonates with me and I hope it does the same for you.

Peace,

RT



A tourist arrived in a small fishing village and walked along the beach, he noticed a fisherman pulling his boat to shore.

The tourist complimented the local fisherman on the quality of their fish and asked how long it took to catch them."Not very long" he answered."Why didn't you stay out longer and catch more?" asked the tourist

The fisherman explained that his small catches were sufficient to meet his needs." But what do you do with the rest of your time? "asked the tourist"

We sleep late ,fish a little, play with our children, and take a siesta with our wives. In the evenings we go into the village to see our friends, have a few drinks, play the guitar, sing a few songs. We have a full life" replied the fishermen

The tourist interrupted, "I have an MBA from Harvard and I can help you! You should start by fishing longer every day. You can then sell the extra fish you catch. With the extra revenue, you can buy a bigger boat."
"And after that, with the extra money the larger boat will bring, you can buy a second one and a third one and so on until you havean entire fleet of trawlers. Instead of selling your fish to a middle man, you can then negotiate directly with the processing plants and maybe even open your own plant. You can then leave this little village and move to Mexico City, Los Angeles, or even New York City! From there you can direct your huge new enterprise."

"How long would that take?" Asked the Fisherman"Twenty, perhaps twenty-five years." replied the tourist.
"And after that?" Asked the Fisherman

"Afterwards? Well my friend, that's when it gets really interesting, "answered the tourist, laughing. "When your business gets really big, you can start buying and selling stocks and make millions!""Millions? Really? And after that?" asked the Fishermen.

"After that you'll be able to retire, live in a tiny village near the coast, sleep late, play with your children, catch a few fish, take a siesta with your wife and spend your evenings drinking and enjoying your friends."

"With all due respect Sir, but that's exactly what we are doing now. So what's the point of wasting twenty-five years?" asked the fishermen

And the moral of this story is: A wonderful life doesn't take money, power, and education.........just wisdom.

Author unknown.
edit on 13-3-2012 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 10:41 AM
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I LOVE this story, thank you so much for posting it.

I feel this way constantly though, like I just wanna pick up and move to a remote little island somewhere, and fish, clam and crab enough to survive. Not milk the land for profits.

That sounds like THE life to me



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 10:46 AM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


Thanks for this story! Love it!

Definitely in the past I was planning on doing an MBA and going crazy in the business world to make millions. I am now really interested in buying a piece of land somewhere beautiful and peaceful in the world and after several years of hard work (hopefully by the time I turn 30 but no later than 35 or 40) move out to leave a similar simpler life as shown in the story.

Gonna make sure I share this.



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 10:56 AM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


Oh, the beauty and irony of the story you posted.

Thank you!


Now, I feel as though I've somewhat wasted 30-plus years of my life...but then again, realistically, I don't live on an island and doubt I could afford to do so at this point...



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 12:01 PM
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reply to post by BurningSpearess
 



I don't think any time is really wasted, just a different path people choose in life.


Realization of what one truly wants and needs in life takes a wise person.

Now the real question is, do people have the intestinal fortitude to completely change their way of life to find tranquility and happiness?



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 12:14 PM
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Great story and so true. I was caught up in the ratrace for a while but guess I was just stupid. Now that I'm cured of that disease I'm going to try to start making something part time. My epilepsy won't let me work many hours a day. I won't be building any houses anymore. I miss creating things, I guess maybe I'll have to build doll houses from now on.



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 12:44 PM
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Originally posted by Realtruth
reply to post by BurningSpearess
 





Now the real question is, do people have the intestinal fortitude to completely change their way of life to find tranquility and happiness?





Or maybe the real question is do they have the gull to run away from the obligations to others, familial, financial, and otherwise?

I often think, after I accomplish w, x, and y, then I'll finally leave for z.

Hoping that makes sense.



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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Originally posted by BurningSpearess

Or maybe the real question is do they have the gull to run away from the obligations to others, familial, financial, and otherwise?

I often think, after I accomplish w, x, and y, then I'll finally leave for z.

Hoping that makes sense.


It makes perfect sense.

Not sure if it's actually running, but rather choosing a different path in life. Sometimes we think we need to be at a certain point in our lives, due to societal expectations, when in reality we are making ourselves miserable.

We have to ask ourselves a couple simple questions, is our current way of life sustainable and is this legacy we want our children to continue after we're gone?

IMO families are almost non-existent due to our current Modus Operandi. Children for the most part, only want love, compassion, a roof over their heads, enough food to eat and quality time spent with their parents.

The only thing we truly have in life is time, time we can never get back, so the ultimate question is how much time are we willing to trade for a dollar amount away from our loved ones, and peace our mind?



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 02:20 PM
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Originally posted by Realtruth
reply to post by BurningSpearess
 



I don't think any time is really wasted, just a different path people choose in life.


Realization of what one truly wants and needs in life takes a wise person.

Now the real question is, do people have the intestinal fortitude to completely change their way of life to find tranquility and happiness?


This reminds me, of one of the things i think i want to do with my life... which is..to join a Buddhist or a Catholic monastery, so i can have the happiness and tranquility as you mentioned, but also the assurance that i'll never have to worried about being fired from a job, or whos going to help me when i get old and sick, or my car not working and other stuff people in the outside world have to deal with that monks dont.. the question i have is.. should i give all this in exchange for the benefits that one gets in becoming a monk...i personally am leaning more towards being a monk than living in the "real" world i dont know if im thinking this thru though...



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 07:06 PM
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Now the real question is, do people have the intestinal fortitude to completely change their way of life to find tranquility and happiness?



That is a great story.


I think the best way to do this for most people though would be to start with realizing that money isn't going to solve all your problems. You still have to make it in order to survive of course, but people need to quit taking it SO seriously ALL the time.

Just a little change in attitude like like would be a good start I think.




posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 07:19 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 

Great story Realtruth, thanks

Now if I can just convince my parents so they will git off my back!
(I love em' though)



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 07:44 PM
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Beautiful.

Thank you.



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 11:38 PM
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Whoa, great story.
I got sick of people who give money the most importance in their life. I once used to think that watching documentaries, movies, playing games is a waste of time and instead I can make more money with that time. And then after a long time, I understood that I am earning money for those things that give me pleasure and happiness so there is no point in not enjoying now just so that I can enjoy better in future. Who is to say that I will live next year or heck, the next day. Keep enjoying the present!



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 09:03 AM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 


Paradise is a myth (at least as many religions paint it)....and a miserable place.

As humans, we would rot there. We humans thrive on conflict, whether physical, mental, or emotional. We NEED it in our lives, we define ourselves and the human experience by it.

The idea of a place without conflict may seem ideal, but if you REALLY think about it, it would be boring as hell, and we'd hang ourselves with our halos.

Who cares about streets of gold? Can you imagine how bright that would be when the sun hits? (and I'll bet it's a very hot street).



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


If you thrive on conflict i wouldn't want to be your friend.
Here is a short video to explain what i mean:
youtu.be...



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 10:54 AM
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Why can't we acknowledge that one MAN's pleasure is not necessarily ALL men's pleasure?

The fisherman's life sounds great...if that's what one wants out of life. His paradise is another's he'll. Someone built his boat. Someone refined the gas used for the motor. Someone built the motor. Someone made the fishing pole, hook, etc. Perhaps making things for others, and/or making money selling other people things, made THOSE people happy.

Personally, I love sales. Signing huge contracts, acquiring new clients, and making the amount of money I want to do things I like to do -- such as traveling the world, going to resorts, educating my children in private schools -- makes me and my family happy.

The moral of this story to me: people should find what makes them happy and live their life according to that.



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 11:57 AM
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we'd hang ourselves with our halos.





I understand what you're saying, the way I look at it though is that we need both so we can better appreciate both. If things were good ALL the time we'd get kind of jaded by it and take it for granted. Mix in a little bad every now and then and not only does it keep us on our toes, but it helps us to better appreciate the good things life has to offer.




posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by Realtruth
 



We have to ask ourselves a couple simple questions, is our current way of life sustainable and is this legacy we want our children to continue after we're gone?


Unfortunately, I don't have children (but do have dear nieces and nephews--whose parents would treat me as crazy with such proposal).

I am talking about my aging mom with ill health who I am primarily responsible for, and the *now* pragmatics of that situation...

If I could turn back time with the insight I have now, and implied in your story, I am sure that I would have done things differently for the both of us.

Don't get me wrong--we still enjoy plenty of pleasant quality time when she is able....but sometimes I feel guilty that I may be missing out. Most times, though, I feel good that I am doing the right thing as she is one of the closest friends I have on earth....So maybe this is *my paradise*...




edit on 14-3-2012 by BurningSpearess because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 12:41 PM
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Originally posted by BurningSpearess

Don't get me wrong--we still enjoy plenty of pleasant quality time when she is able....but sometimes I feel guilty that I may be missing out. Most times, though, I feel good that I am doing the right thing as she is one of the closest friends I have on earth....So maybe this is *my paradise*...




I think that is the key here, each person's idea of paradise maybe very different, but spending time with loved ones is very important.

Thanks for sharing your story.




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