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Ultra-efficient LED puts out more power than is pumped in

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posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 11:20 AM
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This one is for the over-unity folks:

Source



MIT physicists have managed to build a light-emitting diode that has an electrical efficiency of more than 100 percent. You may ask, "Wouldn't that mean it breaks the first law of thermodynamics?" The answer, happily, is no.


This (extremely) low power LED uses electrical energy to pull in heat from its surroundings, giving it the ability to put out more power than is put into it. At this point, it's not all that useable for lighting purposes (69 picowatts isn't a lot of light) but at 230 percent efficiency, it has enormous implications for future development.




posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 11:24 AM
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Imagine a hundred thousand of these things lined up in a grid near a dessert. If we could somehow capture their output then it would be a renewable energy source. The only thing we would truly need to jump-start the system is a quick input of outside energy and then let it sustain itself.

Although I think photovoltaic cells are advancing quick enough that this won't ever see implementation.



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 11:28 AM
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reply to post by nuclear12346
 


That would be one possible use for a device like this...I was thinking along the lines of using the heat drawing abilities to cool down microprocessors and convert the energy into useful light.

BTW I'm sure you meant lining these up in a desert, not a dessert. I envisioned a bunch of these gathered around a chocolate cheesecake.

edit on 12-3-2012 by avocadoshag because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 11:41 AM
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reply to post by nuclear12346
 


well, with 100,000 of these working you will get 69 microWatts of energy... :-)

you'd need 100 trillion of those to power anything reasonable.



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 12:11 PM
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they are 'producing' pico watts of electricicy - so small as to be accountable via normal small fluctuations in temperature, humidty, etc, or movement, like the slight tremmor as a cockroack walks past. All of the every day fluctuations would have to be accounted as not causing this before I started getting interested, and even then maybe not. This is not, and never will be OU.



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 12:50 PM
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What wavelength of light is it? If it's deep IR all it's doing is amplifying ambient heat and thus would not be OU.



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 03:34 PM
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Those LED flash lights are quite good.
Well I got one for free with a hardware purchase.
No I did find the light can give a very clear light to reflect off surroundings.

Usually electricity flow causes heating.
The IR, current times resistance, heating we pay for from the power companies.
Any Air conditioner fans provide a rotating field giving back voltage to the grid
or at least given credit for in any phase power factor calculation.
I do not think the new digital meters work that way as analog magnetism math
has been lost along with the details of the meter mechanism. Perhaps the copper
has become too costly. Any power factor calculated indicates the real power
to be paid for.

So we do not have any rotating phenomena for a generator with LEDs.
The only straight environment to electricity I have come across so far in
the search for free energy was the burning on Nitrogen giving 12Mv to be
used in some Tesla system that vanished. This Nitrogen burning is a new
phenomena created with 7Kv DC and quantum Iron characteristics call K
capture and the Nitrogen quickly goes back into the environment. It might
even occur with UFO phenomena.

So the heat environment near the LED now makes overunity possible.
Perhaps the LED capture of the Tesla 50x SOL particles has the electrical
generating ability. So far the Lyne theory has a heating capture for a
furnace rivaling E-Cat and not an electrical capture.

This sound promising for the LED business.



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 03:39 PM
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I liked the desert idea.
I would add that you could combine an array of this LEDS with a Solar array, and now you have a system that harvests both photonic and thermal energy working in tandem...
That'd be nice...



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 03:41 PM
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Originally posted by CrastneyJPR
they are 'producing' pico watts of electricicy - so small as to be accountable via normal small fluctuations in temperature, humidty, etc, or movement, like the slight tremmor as a cockroack walks past.


yeah screw it... TO THE WASTE BIN WITH THIS ONE!!

stupid scientists... always proving theories n' stuff without hollywood BANGS and WOWS for the adhd masses...

god why can't they ENTERTAIN US FIRST in order to prove a breakthrough..

and man i have to waait and waiiit a decade or so for renewable free-ish energy??? phoey.. i want it NOW NOW!!! WAAAAAHHH!!!!



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 10:46 PM
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reply to post by CrastneyJPR
 


No, it's not OU...but the point is that the power output of the LED is more than the power put in from the electrical source. If it's really true (and let's face it, it could turn out to be a measurement error) it has some serious possibility for new technologies.



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 10:58 PM
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I'll add more information here, from the American Physical Society website. Their synopsis of the research paper starts with:



Physicists have known for decades that, in principle, a semiconductor device can emit more light power than it consumes electrically. Experiments published in Physical Review Letters finally demonstrate this in practice, though at a small scale.


The synopsis doesn't state what wavelength of light is emitted from the LED, but this does appear to be well-documented and not an error in measurement. The practical applications for this technology?




These initial results provide too little light for most applications. However, heating the light emitters increases their output power and efficiency, meaning they are like thermodynamic heat engines, except they come with the fast electrical control of modern semiconductor devices.


If this can be duplicated on a larger scale there will be many applications for a device that can turn unwanted heat into light energy.



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 12:16 AM
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reply to post by prevenge
 


I don't think I have seen a more childish post since I joined ATS. The other guy has a valid point, the energy is so meaningless there could be outside sources. Of course I think he simply failed to read there is an outside source, heat from the surrounding areas.

Perhaps informing him of this and saying it does not sound impressive now, but what might this technology be combined with to make it very useful?

Instead you decide to go on a childish rant.



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 12:28 AM
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This is actually pretty ... cool.

I would have thought you couldn't get a bandgap small enough to extract energy from phonons, without getting so much leakage that you'd have no net gain.

edit to add: this sounds a bit like a Johnson noise rectifier, which is one of those Maxwell's demon things, supposedly impossible to achieve. So part of me wants to believe, and the majority of me thinks they're a couple of terms short of a Hamiltonian somewhere.
edit on 13-3-2012 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 04:13 AM
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Originally posted by OccamsRazor04
reply to post by prevenge
 


I don't think I have seen a more childish post since I joined ATS. The other guy has a valid point, the energy is so meaningless there could be outside sources. Of course I think he simply failed to read there is an outside source, heat from the surrounding areas.

Perhaps informing him of this and saying it does not sound impressive now, but what might this technology be combined with to make it very useful?

Instead you decide to go on a childish rant.


YEah I did.. it was on a whim.. and I'm not proud of it.. was just blabbing.. I guess I just thought he was being snobbish in thinking he could dimune scientist's efforts by them "not being ready for his needs" enough.. or such.. get what i'm saying?? they put out there theory and proved it and had it working but he was just a nay sayer and i played into his naysaying...

not tryin to be childish et.c..



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 04:25 AM
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i feel like the title is misleading. it isn't putting out more power than is being put it, it's using additional energy that already exists around it as heat.

hmm...if it takes heat energy from the surrounding environment and converts it into light, wouldn't the surrounding air be cooled? who knows how this will be used.



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 07:17 AM
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This discovery is very much the sort of subtle breakthrough, that could mean untold benifits for various areas of science , mostly in the computer sciences area I think, but also in other areas. The possibilities of course, are unlikely to be truely realised for some time to come, but I see interesting developments ahead in chipset design, temperature indicator units for refridgeration, and even the interior lighting of fridges and freezers. Could be a very interesting development, and I for one cannot wait to see what comes of it.



posted on Mar, 13 2012 @ 09:10 AM
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Originally posted by windlass34
reply to post by nuclear12346
 


well, with 100,000 of these working you will get 69 microWatts of energy... :-)

you'd need 100 trillion of those to power anything reasonable.


Even then, with today's technology I see that very plausible.



posted on Mar, 15 2012 @ 09:30 AM
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reply to post by Bob Sholtz
 


Well, yes the title is somewhat misleading. I went with the title of the original news article, cause that's standard practice here (I think). But it catches one's attention better than "LED emits more light power than it consumes electrically".



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