It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Moon Tower

page: 2
8
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 05:10 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Nice work as usual Phage.
Thank you for providing the exact location on the moon.

OK,you busted a moon myth which some folks love-but you may have exposed the truth of the matter,which is better than any speculation.




posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 05:13 PM
link   
reply to post by doug r
 

The Apollo WMS map has always been like that. Are you sure you weren't someplace else, like this maybe:
www.mapaplanet.org...

In any case the Clementine images are of pretty poor resolution (25 meters at best).



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 05:15 PM
link   
reply to post by ReconX
 


Isn´t this the same tower as was filmed here in this thread www.abovetopsecret.com...



The guy who filmed it came on the thread and talked about it, showed his gear etc.



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 10:33 PM
link   
reply to post by NeoVain
 


Yeah, and he also explained that his camera zoom increases his telescopic magnification, which all logic points to he doesn't know very much about optics. Of course we don't know how this delicate optical magnification works in his secret way but I was always under the impression that the only way to get telescopic magnification to increase is to get a bigger reflecting mirror, otherwise you are just magnifying distortion.



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 10:53 PM
link   
reply to post by Illustronic
 
How cameras work > electronics.howstuffworks.com...



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 11:02 PM
link   



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 11:11 PM
link   
reply to post by Illustronic
 


I was going to post a link to "how telescopes work" but then i saw that a "camera" was mentioned,so i didnt...



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 11:20 PM
link   
reply to post by blocula
 


Right, a camera will not increase the telescopic optical resolution of a telescope, it will only enlarge the image of the optical resolution of that telescope.



posted on Mar, 10 2012 @ 11:49 PM
link   

Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by blocula
 


Right, a camera will not increase the telescopic optical resolution of a telescope, it will only enlarge the image of the optical resolution of that telescope.
Do you,or anyone else,know if the hubble telescope is capable of taking "relatively" close-up pictures of the moons surface? or is it designed for viewing only very far away objects? and could a "real time" movie/video camera be somehow connected to the hubble telescope,so we could watch what its seeing,at the same time? Then we could look for "live action" aliens and alien activity on the moon,instead of just looking at "freeze frame" photos,unless the aliens conceal themselves beneath its surface and on its dark side,which "just happens" to always face away from us...
edit on 10-3-2012 by blocula because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 12:31 AM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by doug r
 

The Apollo WMS map has always been like that. Are you sure you weren't someplace else, like this maybe:
www.mapaplanet.org...

In any case the Clementine images are of pretty poor resolution (25 meters at best).


The map that I found those anomalies on wasn't the Apollo WMS map. It was from the Clementine map used as the template for placement of the Apollo images.

And a 25 meter resolution is enough to show large structures.
Maybe you can comment on the images I posted instead of commenting on WMS?

Maybe you weren't aware but Clementine did indeed use LIDAR:

The Clementine Laser Image Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) experiment was designed to measure the distance from the spacecraft to a point on the surface of the Moon. This will allow an altimetric map to be made, which can be used to constrain the morphology of large basins and other lunar features, study stress and strain and flexural properties of the lithosphere, and can be combined with gravity to study the density distribution in the crust.
en.wikipedia.org...(spacecraft)#Laser_Image_Detection_and_Ranging_.28LIDAR.29_System
edit on 11-3-2012 by doug r because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 01:01 AM
link   
reply to post by blocula
 


I have read the resolution capabilities of the Hubble of the moon. I can't recite the actual measurements, but the question was raised if the flag could be seen by the Hubble, and the resolving resolution was at least 30X to vague. What people don't fully understand is the images from the Hubble of nebulas and galaxies in the distance are just dim, not small, most have the angular size in the sky larger than the moon.

The LRO to date, owns the highest resolution images of the lunar surface, period, by nearly 10X anything else.



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 01:05 AM
link   
reply to post by doug r
 


Your link takes us to a variety of oranges. How is that topical?



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 01:11 AM
link   
reply to post by Illustronic
 
When you say "dim,not small" i'm not sure what you mean? I thought that when the hubble focuses on something,like those famous deep field photos it took which show hundreds of galaxies,it was only focusing on a very small fraction of available space,like the size of a postage stamp held out at arms length against the entire sky...


edit on 11-3-2012 by blocula because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 01:15 AM
link   
reply to post by blocula
 


You can hide the moon with a postage stamp held at arm's length. In fact I believe the actual size is well within one quarter inch.



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 01:21 AM
link   

Originally posted by Illustronic
reply to post by blocula
 


You can hide the moon with a postage stamp held at arm's length. In fact I believe the actual size is well within one quarter inch.
I can hide my view of reality by holding two stamps,one in front of each of my eyes...



posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 03:18 AM
link   
reply to post by doug r
 

I guess you could see very large structures at 25 meter resolution but why use that when much higher resolution images are available?

I don't see any anomalies in the images you posted. Unless you are talking about the rilles seen in the first one but they aren't really anomalies.


Yes, I was unaware that Clementine carried a LIDAR system. I was aware that a rough digital elevation model was created, I should have realized it was made using a laser system.



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 01:50 PM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Why are there no pictures of the right side of your little map you provided there? Not being a smart A$$ or anything, just asking??

Do they offer an explanation, or are we just that interested in the left side of that map??
edit on 3/12/2012 by Chrisfishenstein because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2012 @ 01:57 PM
link   
reply to post by Chrisfishenstein
 


Lunar Orbiter III is known as the site-confirmation mission. It was tasked to re-photograph 12 potential landing sites identified by LO I and II with a comprehensive array of vertical, oblique, and forward wide-angle stereo and convergent telephoto stereo photography. These data led to a down-select to eight candidate landing sites for early Apollo missions. This mission also targeted secondary sites of scientific interest on the lunar farside and at higher latitudes on the lunar nearside.

www.lpi.usra.edu...



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 10:57 AM
link   
reply to post by blocula
 


Yes the hubble would be able to resolve objects about 300ft across that's why its not able to see the Apollo Landers etc.



posted on Mar, 14 2012 @ 04:37 PM
link   
reply to post by ReconX
 


That doesn't look like a tower could be a neutral rock moon formation.


edit on 14-3-2012 by Agent_USA_Supporter because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-3-2012 by Agent_USA_Supporter because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
8
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join